Radcliffe-cum-Farnworth (UK Parliament constituency)

Last updated
Radcliffe-cum-Farnworth
Former constituency
for the House of Commons
18851918
Number of membersone
Replaced by Heywood and Radcliffe, Farnworth
Created from South East Lancashire

Radcliffe-cum-Farnworth was a parliamentary constituency centred on the towns of Radcliffe and Farnworth in Lancashire. It returned one Member of Parliament (MP) to the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom, elected by the first past the post system.

Contents

History

This area had previously been represented as part of South East Lancashire division. Under the Redistribution of Seats Act 1885, the constituency was created for the 1885 general election and was abolished for the 1918 general election.

Boundaries

The South East Lancashire, Radcliffe-cum-Farnworth Division was defined in the 1885 legislation as consisting of the parishes of Farnworth, Kearsley, Little Hulton and Pilkington (including Whitefield and Unsworth) and the parish of Radcliffe except the area in the Municipal Borough of Bury. [1] [2]

At the next redistribution of seats in 1918, the constituency was split between two new seats: Farnworth (which included Little Hulton and Kearsley) and Heywood and Radcliffe (which took in Unsworth and Whitefield). [3]

Members of Parliament

ElectionMemberParty
1885 Robert Leake Liberal
1895 John James Mellor Conservative
1900 Theodore Taylor Liberal
1918 constituency abolished: see Heywood and Radcliffe & Farnworth

Elections

Decades:

Elections in the 1880s

General election 1885: Radcliffe-cum-Farnworth [4]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Liberal Robert Leake 5,092 52.7
Conservative William Hulton 4,57947.3
Majority5135.4
Turnout 9,67192.7
Registered electors 10,433
Liberal win (new seat)
General election 1886: Radcliffe-cum-Farnworth [4]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Liberal Robert Leake 4,695 50.7 -2.0
Conservative Frederick Milner 4,55949.3+2.0
Majority1361.4-4.0
Turnout 9,25488.7-4.0
Registered electors 10,433
Liberal hold Swing -2.0

Elections in the 1890s

Mellor John James Mellor.jpg
Mellor
General election 1892: Radcliffe-cum-Farnworth [4]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Liberal Robert Leake 4,999 50.5 -0.2
Conservative John James Mellor 4,90449.5+0.2
Majority951.0-0.4
Turnout 9,90392.7+4.0
Registered electors 10,686
Liberal hold Swing -0.2
Pollard George Pollard.jpg
Pollard
General election 1895: Radcliffe-cum-Farnworth [4]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Conservative John James Mellor 5,523 52.9 +3.4
Liberal George Pollard 4,92347.1-3.4
Majority6005.8N/A
Turnout 10,44692.8+0.1
Registered electors 11,259
Conservative gain from Liberal Swing +3.4

Elections in the 1900s

Taylor Theodore Cooke Taylor.jpg
Taylor
General election 1900: Radcliffe-cum-Farnworth [4]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Liberal Theodore Taylor 5,497 50.3 +3.2
Conservative J.C. Cross5,43749.7-3.2
Majority600.6N/A
Turnout 10,83489.3-3.5
Registered electors 12,244
Liberal gain from Conservative Swing +3.2
General election 1906: Radcliffe-cum-Farnworth [4]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Liberal Theodore Taylor 6,719 56.8 +6.5
Conservative S. Musgrave5,11743.2-6.5
Majority1,60213.6+13.0
Turnout 11,83690.0+0.7
Registered electors 13,151
Liberal hold Swing +6.5

Elections in the 1910s

General election January 1910: Radcliffe-cum-Farnworth [4]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Liberal Theodore Taylor 7,367 55.8 -1.0
Conservative Edward White 5,82744.2+1.0
Majority1,54011.6-2.0
Turnout 13,19493.9+3.9
Registered electors 14,046
Liberal hold Swing -1.0
General election December 1910: Radcliffe-cum-Farnworth [4]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Liberal Theodore Taylor 6,721 53.1 -2.7
Conservative Edward Bagley 5,93746.9+2.7
Majority7846.2-5.4
Turnout 12,65890.1-3.8
Registered electors 14,046
Liberal hold Swing -2.7

General Election 1914–15:

Another General Election was required to take place before the end of 1915. The political parties had been making preparations for an election to take place and by the July 1914, the following candidates had been selected;

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References

  1. 1885 c.23 sch.7
  2. Boundary Commissioners for England and Wales (1885). "South East Lancashire, New Divisions of County (Map)". Report of the Boundary Commissioners for England and Wales. londonancestor.com. Retrieved 2008-09-28.
  3. F A Youngs Jr., Guide to the Local Administrative Units of England, Vol. II: Northern England, London, 1991
  4. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 British Parliamentary Election Results 1885-1918, FWS Craig

Sources