Second Virginia Charter

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The land of the 1609 charter

The Second Virginia Charter, also known as the Charter of 1609 (dated May 23, 1609), provided "a further Enlargement and Explanation of the said [first] Grant, Privileges, and Liberties" which gave the London Company adventurers influence in determining the policies of the company, extended the Company's rights to land extending "up into the Land throughout from Sea to Sea", and allowed English merchant companies and individuals to invest in the colonization effort. [1] [2] The charter includes a detailed list of the names of some 650 noblemen, gentlemen, officials, companies, and individuals who subscribed as investors. [3]

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References

  1. Lillian Goldman Law Library, Yale University: The Second Charter of Virginia; May 23, 1609, http://avalon.law.yale.edu/17th_century/va02.asp#1, 2008.
  2. Wesley F. Craven: The Virginia Company of London, 1606-1624, Williamsburg, Va.: Virginia 350th Anniversary Celebration Corporation, 1957.
  3. Lillian Goldman Law Library, op. cit..