Soviet Union women's national football team

Last updated

Soviet Union
Association Football Federation of USSR
Home stadiumVarious
FIFA code URS
Kit left arm.svg
Kit body Soviet Union.png
Kit body.svg
Kit right arm.svg
Kit shorts.svg
Kit socks long.svg
First colours
Kit left arm.svg
Kit body Soviet Union away.png
Kit body.svg
Kit right arm.svg
Kit shorts.svg
Kit socks long.svg
Second colours
First international
Flag of Bulgaria (1971-1990).svg  Bulgaria 1–4 Soviet Union  Flag of the Soviet Union.svg
(Kazanlak, Bulgaria; 26 March 1990)
Last international

Flag of the Soviet Union.svg  Soviet Union 2–1 Hungary  Flag of Hungary.svg
(Soviet Union; 6 October 1991)
Biggest win
Flag of Bulgaria (1971-1990).svg  Bulgaria 1–4 Soviet Union  Flag of the Soviet Union.svg
(Kazanlak, Bulgaria; 26 March 1990)
Biggest defeat
Flag of the United States.svg  United States 8 – 0 Soviet Union  Flag of the Soviet Union.svg
(Blaine, Minnesota, USA; 5 August 1990)

The USSR women's national football team represented the Soviet Union in international women's football. The team was controlled by the Football Federation of USSR. It was founded in 1990, so it was a short-lived national team due to the dissolution of the Soviet Union the following year. Oleg Lapshin served as the team's coach during its 20 months of existence.

Soviet Union 1922–1991 country in Europe and Asia

The Soviet Union, officially the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics (USSR), was a socialist state in Eurasia that existed from 30 December 1922 to 26 December 1991. Nominally a union of multiple national Soviet republics, its government and economy were highly centralized. The country was a one-party state, governed by the Communist Party with Moscow as its capital in its largest republic, the Russian Soviet Federative Socialist Republic. Other major urban centres were Leningrad, Kiev, Minsk, Alma-Ata, and Novosibirsk.

Dissolution of the Soviet Union Process leading to the late-1991 breakup of the USSR

The dissolution of the Soviet Union occurred on 26 December 1991, officially granting self-governing independence to the Republics of the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics (USSR). It was a result of the declaration number 142-Н of the Supreme Soviet of the Soviet Union. The declaration acknowledged the independence of the former Soviet republics and created the Commonwealth of Independent States (CIS), although five of the signatories ratified it much later or did not do so at all. On the previous day, 25 December, Soviet President Mikhail Gorbachev, the eighth and final leader of the USSR, resigned, declared his office extinct and handed over its powers—including control of the Soviet nuclear missile launching codes—to Russian President Boris Yeltsin. That evening at 7:32 p.m., the Soviet flag was lowered from the Kremlin for the last time and replaced with the pre-revolutionary Russian flag.

The Soviet team played its first match on 26 March 1990 against Bulgaria in Kazanlak. A. Bezmenova, Tatyana Verezubova and Irina Gnutova made it a 4–1 win. Two weeks later they played their first match on Soviet soil, a 0–0 draw against Norway in Sevastopol. The Soviet women's national team didn't take part in the 1991 UEFA Women's Championship qualification, instead playing friendly matches. [1]

The Bulgaria national women’s football team is the national football team of Bulgaria and is controlled by the Bulgarian Football Union. The team's major success came in 2008 when they won the Balkan Championship and the Albena Cup in the same year. These major tournament victories brought them up to their all-time highest FIFA world ranking of 33rd.

Kazanlak Place in Stara Zagora, Bulgaria

Kazanlak (Bulgarian: Казанлъ̀к, Kazanlǎk, Thracian and Greek Σευθόπολις is a Bulgarian town in Stara Zagora Province, located in the middle of the plain of the same name, at the foot of the Balkan mountain range, at the eastern end of the Rose Valley. It is the administrative centre of the homonymous Kazanlak Municipality.

Norway womens national football team womens national association football team representing Norway

The Norway women's national football team is controlled by the Football Association of Norway. The team is former European, World and Olympic champions and thus one of the most successful national teams. The team has had less success since the 2011 FIFA Women's World Cup.

The USSR was accepted for the 1993 UEFA Women's Championship, which would have marked its first appearance in an official women's football tournament. The Soviet national team played its only official game on 6 October 1991, a 2–1 win over Hungary. It was also the last match of the team, which ended its short existence with a balance of 9 wins, 9 draws and 16 losses. The second qualification game was played on February 1992 after the break-up of the USSR Football Federation, with the debuting Russia women's national team representing the new Russian Federation.

Hungary womens national football team womens national association football team representing Hungary

The Hungary women's national football team represents Hungary in international women's football. The team, controlled by the Hungarian Football Federation.

Russia womens national football team womens national association football team representing Russia

The Russia women's national football team represents Russia in international women's football. The team is controlled by the Football Union of Russia and affiliated with UEFA. Vera Pauw replaced Igor Shalimov as coach of the team in April 2011.

Related Research Articles

UEFA international sport governing body

The Union of European Football Associations is the administrative body for association football in Europe, although several member states are primarily or entirely located in Asia. It is one of six continental confederations of world football's governing body FIFA. UEFA consists of 55 national association members.

UEFA European Championship European association football tournament for mens national teams

The UEFA European Championship is the primary association football competition contested by the senior men's national teams of the members of the Union of European Football Associations (UEFA), determining the continental champion of Europe. Held every four years since 1960, in the even-numbered year between World Cup tournaments, it was originally called the UEFA European Nations' Cup, changing to the current name in 1968. Starting with the 1996 tournament, specific championships are often referred to in the form "UEFA Euro [year]"; this format has since been retroactively applied to earlier tournaments.

The Lithuania national football team is under the auspices of the Lithuanian Football Federation. It played its first match in 1923. In 1940, Lithuania was occupied by the Soviet Union; the country regained its independence in 1990 and played their first match as a new nation against Georgia on 27 May of that year.

Armenia national football team mens national association football team representing Armenia

The Armenia national football team represents Armenia in association football and is controlled by the Football Federation of Armenia, the governing body for football in Armenia. After gaining independence from the Soviet Union, the team played its first international match on October 12, 1992. Armenia's home ground is the Republican Stadium in Yerevan. The national team has participated in the qualification of every major tournament from the UEFA Euro 1996 onwards, though they are yet to qualify for the knockout stage in either a UEFA European Football Championship or a FIFA World Cup. In what was the Armenian national squad's greatest success at present, the team came in third place in the UEFA Euro 2012 qualifying stage, with controversial officiating preventing them from achieving second place, and hence moving on to the play-off stage.

Latvia national football team mens national association football team representing Latvia

The Latvia national football team represents the country in international football competitions, such as the World Cup and the European Championships. It is controlled by the Latvian Football Federation, the governing body for football in Latvia. They have never qualified for the World Cup, but they have, however, qualified for the European Championship in 2004, under Aleksandrs Starkovs.

FC Dinamo Tbilisi association football club based in Tbilisi, Georgia

FC Dinamo Tbilisi is a professional football club based in Tbilisi, Georgia, that competes in the Erovnuli Liga, the top flight of Georgian football.

Soviet Union national football team former mens national association football team representing the Soviet Union

The Soviet Union national football team was the national football team of the Soviet Union.

Estonia national football team mens national association football team representing Estonia

The Estonia national football team represents Estonia in international football and is controlled by the Estonian Football Association, the governing body for football in Estonia. Estonia play their home matches at the A. Le Coq Arena in Tallinn, Estonia.

Ukraine national football team mens national association football team representing Ukraine

The Ukraine national football team is the national football team of Ukraine and is controlled by the Football Federation of Ukraine. After Ukrainian Independence and the country's breakaway from the Soviet Union, they played their first match against Hungary on 29 April 1992. The team's biggest success on the world stage was reaching the quarter-finals in the 2006 FIFA World Cup, which also marked the team's debut in the finals of a major championship. As the host nation, Ukraine automatically qualified for UEFA Euro 2012. Four years later, Ukraine qualified for Euro 2016 via the play-off route, the first time qualifying for a UEFA European Championship via the qualifying process, as it finished in third place in its qualifying group. This marked the first time in Ukraine's five play-off appearances that it managed to win such a tie, previously having been unsuccessful in the play-off ties for the Euro 2000, 2002 World Cup, 2010 World Cup and 2014 World Cup.

Uzbekistan national football team national association football team

The Uzbekistan national football team represents Uzbekistan in association football and is controlled by the Uzbekistan Football Association, the governing body for football in Uzbekistan. Uzbekistan's home ground is Milliy Stadium in Tashkent and their current head coach is Héctor Cúper. Uzbekistan has never qualified to the final stages of the World Cup, but the team have qualified to every AFC Asian Cup since its declaration of independence. In the Asian Cup in 2011, the Uzbekistan national team reached the semi-finals of the tournament. Uzbekistan won the Gold Medal in the football tournament at the Asian Games 1994 in Japan, and was runner-up in the Afro-Asian Cup of Nations in 1995.

The Football Federation of the USSR was a governing body of football in the Soviet Union and since 1972 the main governing body of football in the country. The Federation was created late in 1934 by the decision of the Supreme Council of Physical Culture of the USSR as its sports section governing specifically football. It was the only organization that obtained recognition of FIFA in 1946.

UEFA European Under-19 Championship European association football tournament for under-19 national teams

The UEFA European Under-19 Championship is an annual football competition for men organised by the sport's European governing body, UEFA.

France national under-21 football team national association football team

The France national under-21 football team, known in France as Les Espoirs, is the national under-21 football team of France and is controlled by the French Football Federation. The team competes in the UEFA European Under-21 Football Championship, held every two years.

Oleg Romantsev Russian footballer and manager

Oleg Ivanovich Romantsev is a Soviet/Russian former international footballer and coach. Romantsev was acclaimed for his success with Spartak Moscow, whom he led to a record eight domestic league titles, and his work with the Russian national team. He is considered by some observers to be the finest coach in the history of Russian football.

CIS national football team national association football team

The CIS national football team was a transitional national team of the Football Federation of the Soviet Union in 1992. It was accepted that the team would represent the Commonwealth of Independent States.

The Spain women's national football team represents Spain in international women's football since 1980, and is controlled by the Royal Spanish Football Federation, the governing body for football in Spain.

Macedonia national under-21 football team national association football team

The North Macedonian national under-21 football team, formerly known as Macedonia under-21(s) and Macedonia U21(s), is a youth association football national team which represents North Macedonia at this age level and is a feeder team for the Macedonia national football team.

The Latvia national under-17 football team or Latvia U-17 represents Latvia in association football at the under-17 youth level, and is controlled by the Latvian Football Federation.

The Soviet national junior football team was the under-16 and under-17 football team of the Soviet Union. It ceased to exist on the breakup of the Union.

References