Street family

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Street
Current region Australia
Place of origin United Kingdom
Founder John Street
Members

The Street family is an Australian dynasty, founded by the banker and politician John Street and his wife Susanna, the daughter of Australian explorer William Lawson. Their son Sir Philip Whistler Street, grandson Sir Kenneth Whistler Street, and great-grandson Sir Laurence Whistler Street each served as Chief Justice of the Supreme Court of New South Wales and Lieutenant-Governor of New South Wales, the only such viceregal succession in Australian history. Sir Kenneth was a cousin of Geoffrey Street, who served as Minister of Defence in the Second World War and whose son Anthony "Tony" Street served as Minister of Foreign Affairs, and Sir Kenneth's wife Lady "Red Jessie" Street was Australia's first female delegate to the United Nations. Sir Laurence's son Alexander "Sandy" Street, daughter Sylvia Emmett (née Street) and son-in-law Arthur Emmett serve as federal judges. [1]

Contents

1st generation

John Rendell Street, MLC (1832–1891) was an Australian banker and politician, born to Maria Wood and John Street, JP . His father descended from Baron Sir Thomas Street, an English Chief Justice who sat on the last King's Bench before the Glorious Revolution of 1688. Both parents were English émigrés to Australia via the 1822 passenger ship Thalia. [2] In 1886, John founded the Perpetual Trustee Company as managing director with fellow trustees Edmund Barton and James Fairfax. He succeeded Edmund Barton, Australia's 1st Prime Minister, in his New South Wales Legislative Assembly seat of East Sydney. John married Susanna Lawson, the daughter of William Lawson, MLC , an Australian explorer who along with William Wentworth and Gregory Blaxland pioneered the first settler crossing of the Blue Mountains in 1813. John and Susanna had seven children, including Philip and Ernest, who married Emma Browne, the daughter of Australian author Thomas Browne. John was a director of the Colonial Mutual Life Assurance Company (now Commonwealth Bank). His sister Sarah married Thomas Smith, MLC , managing director of the Commercial Banking Company of Sydney (now National Australia Bank). [3]

2nd generation

Sir Philip Street, 1st Chief Justice of the family SirPhillipStreetHermes.png
Sir Philip Street, 1st Chief Justice of the family
Lieutenant Laurence Street, an army officer who fought and died in the Gallipoli campaign, aged 21 LieutenantLawrenceStreetArmy.png
Lieutenant Laurence Street, an army officer who fought and died in the Gallipoli campaign, aged 21

Sir Philip Whistler Street, KCMG , KC (1863–1938) was the 8th Chief Justice of the Supreme Court of New South Wales and Lieutenant-Governor of New South Wales. On 11 February 1907, he became a full judge of the Supreme Court of New South Wales. He became Chief Justice of the Supreme Court on 28 January 1925 and held that office until his 70th birthday in 1933. He was appointed Lieutenant-Governor of New South Wales in 1930, and administered the state in the absence of the Governor of New South Wales from May to October 1934, January to February 1935, and January to August 1936. He died in 1938 and was buried with a state funeral at St Andrew's Cathedral. He is the second longest-serving judge in New South Wales history. His second son Laurence died fighting in the Gallipoli campaign, and his eldest son Kenneth went on to succeed him as Chief Justice. [4]

3rd generation

Lieutenant Laurence Whistler Street (1894–1915) was 21 when he was killed in action in May 1915 while fighting in the Gallipoli campaign. A student of Sydney Law School, he enlisted in the Australian Army in August 1914, among the first of his generation, and was made an officer of the 3rd Battalion of the 1st Infantry Brigade. [5]

Lieutenant Colonel Sir Kenneth Whistler Street, KCMG , KStJ , QC (1890–1972) was the 10th Chief Justice of the Supreme Court of New South Wales and Lieutenant-Governor of New South Wales. He was elevated as a judge of the Supreme Court on 7 October 1931, thus joining the bench of which his father was then Chief Justice. According to Percival Serle, this is the only known case in Australian history of a father and a son sitting together as judges on the same bench. Sir Kenneth was sworn in as Chief Justice of the Supreme Court of New South Wales on 7 February 1950. He was Lieutenant-Governor of New South Wales from 1950 to 1972. Prior to his career as a judge, he served in the First World War, having been commissioned on 29 September 1914 in the Duke of Cornwall's Light Infantry and sent to France. He retried with the rank of lieutenant colonel in the Citizens Military Force and was buried with a state funeral at St Andrew's Cathedral, Sydney. Street House at Cranbrook School, Sydney is named in his honour. [6] Sir Kenneth married Jessie Mary Grey Lillingston and named his son Laurence after his brother who died at Gallipoli. Their other children were Belinda, Philippa and Roger.

Lady Street as Australia's only female delegate at the post-war establishment of the United Nations conference at San Francisco in 1945 Jessie Street representing Australia at the United Nations (15314938922).jpg
Lady Street as Australia's only female delegate at the post-war establishment of the United Nations conference at San Francisco in 1945
Sir Kenneth Street, 2nd Chief Justice of the family Kenneth street.jpg
Sir Kenneth Street, 2nd Chief Justice of the family

Jessie Mary Grey, Lady Street (née Lillingston; 1889–1970) was a leading suffragette, dubbed "Red Jessie" by the media. She was the daughter of Charles Alfred Gordon Lillingston, JP and Mabel Harriet Ogilvie, the daughter of Australian politician Edward David Stuart Ogilvie, MLC . [7] She was active in Australian and international political life for over 50 years, from the women's suffrage struggle in England to the removal of Australia's constitutional discrimination against Aboriginal people in 1967. [8] Jessie was Australia's only female delegate to the San Francisco Conference in 1945, where she played a key role in ensuring that gender was included as a non-discrimination clause, in addition to race and religion, in the United Nations Charter. The Jessie Street Centre, the Jessie Street Trust, the Jessie Street National Women's Library and the Jessie Street Gardens exist in her honour. [9]

Brigadier Geoffrey Austin Street, MP , MC (1894–1940) was a cousin of Sir Kenneth's who served as Australia's Minister of Defence in the First Menzies Government during the Second World War. He was awarded a Military Cross for his courage in serving the Australian Imperial Force during the Gallipoli campaign, where he was wounded before returning to service in France during the First World War. At the request of his friend Robert Menzies, he stood for and won the seat of Corangamite in 1934. [10] He was made Minister of Defence in November 1938 and played a major role in the expansion of the military and munitions prior to the outbreak of the Second World War and pushed the National Registration Act (1939) through parliament despite strong opposition, before dying in the 1940 Canberra air disaster. His son Tony Street succeeded him in the seat of Corangamite. [11]

4th generation

Commander Sir Laurence Whistler Street, AC , KCMG , KStJ , QC (1926–2018) was the 14th Chief Justice of the Supreme Court of New South Wales and Lieutenant-Governor of New South Wales. [12] He became Chief Justice and Lieutenant-Governor in 1974, the youngest since 1844. He had joined the Royal Australian Navy at age 17 to serve in the Second World War and went on to become a commander of the Royal Australian Navy Reserve and an honorary colonel of the Australian Army Reserve. Beyond his judicial career, Sir Laurence pioneered the practice of mediation and became the chairman of Fairfax Media and a director of Monte dei Paschi di Siena. [13] Sir Laurence's sister Philippa "Pip" Street married the Australian Test cricketer John "Jack" Henry Webb Fingleton. [14] He was buried with a state funeral at the Sydney Opera House Concert Hall in July 2018. [15] [16] [17]

Susan Gai Watt, AM (born 1932) was the first wife of Sir Laurence and the first female chair of the Eastern Sydney Health Service. She is the daughter of Ruth Edmunds Massey and Ernest Alexander Stuart Watt, niece of Walter Oswald Watt, granddaughter of John Brown Watt, MLC , and great-granddaughter of George Kenyon Holden, MLC . [18]

Anthony Austin "Tony" Street, MP (born 1926), the son of Geoffrey Austin Street, also represented the seat of Corangamite, from 1966 to 1983. A naval veteran of the Second World War, he was Australia's Foreign Minister in the Fourth Fraser Ministry, from 1980 until 1983. He had previously served in the Third Fraser Ministry as Minister for Employment and Industrial Relations and Minister for Industrial Relations. Prior to that, he had served in the Second Fraser Ministry as Minister for Employment and Industrial Relations. [19]

Recent generations

Sir Laurence Street had four children by his first wife Susan, formerly Lady Street, namely Kenneth, Sylvia, Alexander and Sarah. [20] Kenneth Street is a businessman based in New South Wales. By his wife Sarah Street (née Kinross), he has three children. Judge Sylvia Jane Emmett, AM (née Street) is a federal judge and a lieutenant commander of the Royal Australian Naval Reserve. She graduated from Sydney Law School (LLB) and is married to Justice Arthur Emmett, a federal judge and Challis Lecturer in Roman Law at Sydney Law School. Judge Alexander "Sandy" Whistler Street, SC is also a federal judge and a commander of the Royal Australian Naval Reserve. He has four children by two wives. Sarah Whistler Farley (née Street) is a businesswoman and board member of the Prince of Wales Hospital Foundation and the Jessie Street Trust. She graduated from Sydney Law School (LLB) and has four children by her husband, financier Gerard Farley. [21] Jessie Street is Sir Laurence's only child by his second wife and widow Lady (Penelope Patricia; née Ferguson) Street. She holds a Juris Doctor degree from Sydney Law School and is the god-daughter of HRH Charles, Prince of Wales. [22]

See also

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References

  1. "Australian Legal Dynasties: the Stephens and the Streets". Australian Dictionary of Biography. 17 February 2015. Retrieved 27 July 2018.
  2. "'A great lion has fallen': a state fairwell for Sir Laurence Street". The Australian. Retrieved 26 August 2018.
  3. "Mr John Rendell Street (1832–1891)". Former Members of the Parliament of New South Wales . Retrieved 14 July 2021.
  4. Bennett, J. M. "Sir Philip Whistler Street". Australian Dictionary of Biography . Melbourne University Press. ISSN   1833-7538 . Retrieved 5 May 2018 via National Centre of Biography, Australian National University.
  5. "Obituary: Lawrence Whistler (Larry) Street (1893–1915)". Obituaries Australia.
  6. Bennett, J. M. "Sir Kenneth Whistler Street". Australian Dictionary of Biography . Melbourne University Press. ISSN   1833-7538 . Retrieved 14 July 2021 via National Centre of Biography, Australian National University.
  7. "Mr Edward David Stuart Ogilvie (1814–1896)". Former Members of the Parliament of New South Wales . Retrieved 14 July 2021.
  8. Radi, Heather. "Jessie Mary, Lady Street". Australian Dictionary of Biography . Melbourne University Press. ISSN   1833-7538 . Retrieved 14 July 2021 via National Centre of Biography, Australian National University.
  9. "Jessie Street". National Museum of Australia. Retrieved 14 November 2020.
  10. Hazlehurst, Cameron. "Geoffrey Austin Street". Australian Dictionary of Biography . Melbourne University Press. ISSN   1833-7538 . Retrieved 14 July 2021 via National Centre of Biography, Australian National University.
  11. "Obituary: Geoffrey Austin Street (1894–1940)". Obituaries Australia.
  12. Lockhart, Deborah. "Vale Sir Laurence Street". Australian Disputes Centre.
  13. "The Honourable Sir Laurence Whistler Street". Supreme Court of New South Wales.
  14. "John Henry "Jack" Fingleton". Australian Dictionary of Biography . Melbourne University Press. ISSN   1833-7538 . Retrieved 5 May 2018 via National Centre of Biography, Australian National University.
  15. Bailey, Paul. "Sir Laurence Street remembered as an 'outstanding jurist'". Australian Financial Review. Retrieved 26 August 2018.
  16. Collins, Antonette. "Malcolm Turnbull remembers mentor Sir Laurence Street's 'charisma, charm and intellect'". Australian Broadcasting Company.
  17. "Prime Minister leads tributes at state funeral for former chief justice". Daily Telegraph.
  18. Irving, T. H. "George Kenyon Holden". Australian Dictionary of Biography . Melbourne University Press. ISSN   1833-7538 . Retrieved 5 May 2018 via National Centre of Biography, Australian National University.
  19. "The Honourable Anthony Austin Street". Melbourne Grammar School.
  20. "Dynasties: the Street Family". Australian Broadcasting Company.
  21. "The Trust". Jessie Street Trust. Retrieved 26 August 2018.
  22. Stephens, Tony. "Sir Laurence Street: the very model of a modern chief justice". Sydney Morning Herald. Retrieved 26 August 2018.