Thomas Rose House

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Thomas Rose House
59 Church St - Sep 2013.jpg
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Location 5759 Church St.
Charleston, South Carolina
Coordinates 32°46′24″N79°55′46″W / 32.77333°N 79.92944°W / 32.77333; -79.92944 Coordinates: 32°46′24″N79°55′46″W / 32.77333°N 79.92944°W / 32.77333; -79.92944
Area 0.3 acres (0.12 ha)
Built 1733
Architectural style Georgian
NRHP reference # 70000892 [1]
Added to NRHP October 15, 1970

The Thomas Rose House is a National Register property located at 59 Church St. in Charleston, South Carolina. [2] [3] The 2 12-story stuccoed brick house was probably built by planter Thomas Rose in 1733. Thomas Rose House was built on a lot granted through the King’s Lords Proprietor to Elizabeth Willis in 1680 — “one of the few grants given to a woman. [4] ” Thomas Rose constructed the house on the original Charles Town Lot no. 61, inherited by his wife, Beuler Elliott, replacing an earlier dwelling. The house has excellent examples of original Georgian woodwork in the paneling, staircase, and elsewhere. In the twentieth century an owner razed a neighboring house on the adjoining lot to the south to accommodate a large garden.

National Register of Historic Places listings in Charleston County, South Carolina Wikimedia list article

This is a list of the National Register of Historic Places listings in Charleston County, South Carolina.

Charleston, South Carolina City in the United States

Charleston is the oldest and largest city in the U.S. state of South Carolina, the county seat of Charleston County, and the principal city in the Charleston–North Charleston–Summerville Metropolitan Statistical Area. The city lies just south of the geographical midpoint of South Carolina's coastline and is located on Charleston Harbor, an inlet of the Atlantic Ocean formed by the confluence of the Ashley, Cooper, and Wando rivers. Charleston had an estimated population of 134,875 in 2017. The estimated population of the Charleston metropolitan area, comprising Berkeley, Charleston, and Dorchester counties, was 761,155 residents in 2016, the third-largest in the state and the 78th-largest metropolitan statistical area in the United States.

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References

  1. National Park Service (2010-07-09). "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places . National Park Service.
  2. Fant, Mrs. James W. (August 29, 1970). "Thomas Rose House" (pdf). National Register of Historic Places - Nomination and Inventory. Retrieved 23 June 2012.
  3. "Thomas Rose House, Charleston County (57-59 Church St., Charleston)". National Register Properties in South Carolina. South Carolina Department of Archives and History. Retrieved 23 June 2012.
  4. Parker, Jim. "High-end Charleston real estate agency lists 280-year-old 'historically significant' residence at 59 Church St. for $5.6 million". Post and Courier. Retrieved 2017-10-29.