Thomas and Latitia Gluyas House

Last updated
Thomas and Latitia Gluyas House
USA North Carolina location map.svg
Red pog.svg
Usa edcp location map.svg
Red pog.svg
Location7314 Mount Holly-Huntersville Rd., Huntersville, North Carolina
Coordinates 35°20′39″N80°54′3″W / 35.34417°N 80.90083°W / 35.34417; -80.90083 Coordinates: 35°20′39″N80°54′3″W / 35.34417°N 80.90083°W / 35.34417; -80.90083
Area2.1 acres (0.85 ha)
Built1865 (1865)
Architectural styleI-house
MPS Mecklenburg County MPS Mecklenburg County MPS
NRHP reference # 01000725 [1]
Added to NRHPJuly 11, 2001

Thomas and Latitia Gluyas House is a historic home located near Huntersville, Mecklenburg County, North Carolina. It was built about 1865, and is a two-story, three bay, I-house with a one-story rear ell. It has side gable roof, exterior brick end chimneys, and a full-width hip roofed porch. [2]

Huntersville, North Carolina Town in North Carolina, United States

Huntersville is a large suburban town in Mecklenburg County, North Carolina, United States. A part of the Charlotte metropolitan area, the population was 46,773 at the 2010 census, and had increased to 52,704 according to the 2015 census annual estimate, making Huntersville the 17th largest municipality in North Carolina. It is located 14 mi (23 km) north of Charlotte.

Mecklenburg County, North Carolina U.S. county in North Carolina, United States

Mecklenburg County is a county located in the southwestern region of the state of North Carolina, in the United States. As of the 2010 census, the population was 919,618. It increased to 1,034,070 as of the 2015 estimate, making it the most populous county in North Carolina and the first county in the Carolinas to surpass 1 million in population. Its county seat and largest city is Charlotte.

I-house

The I-house is a vernacular house type, popular in the United States from the colonial period onward. The I-house was so named in the 1930s by Fred Kniffen, a cultural geographer at Louisiana State University who was a specialist in folk architecture. He identified and analyzed the type in his 1936 study of Louisiana house types. He chose the name "I-house" because of its common occurrence in the rural farm areas of Indiana, Illinois and Iowa, all states beginning with the letter "I". He did not use the term to imply that this house type originated in, or was restricted to, those three states. It is also referred to as Plantation Plain style.

It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 2001. [1]

National Register of Historic Places Federal list of historic sites in the United States

The National Register of Historic Places (NRHP) is the United States federal government's official list of districts, sites, buildings, structures and objects deemed worthy of preservation for their historical significance. A property listed in the National Register, or located within a National Register Historic District, may qualify for tax incentives derived from the total value of expenses incurred in preserving the property.

Related Research Articles

Swan Ponds United States historic place

Swan Ponds is a historic plantation house located near Morganton, Burke County, North Carolina. It was built in 1848, and is a two-story, three bay, brick mansion with a low hip roof in the Greek Revival style. It features a one-story low hip-roof porch with bracketed eaves, a low pedimented central pavilion, and square columns. Swan Ponds plantation was the home of Waightstill Avery (1741–1821), an early American lawyer and soldier. His son Isaac Thomas Avery built the present Swan Ponds dwelling. Swan Ponds was the birthplace of North Carolina politician and lawyer William Waightstill Avery (1816–1864), Clarke Moulton Avery owner of Magnolia Place, and Confederate States Army officer Isaac E. Avery (1828–1863).

Paschal-Womble House United States historic place

Paschal-Womble House is a historic home located at Goldston, Chatham County, North Carolina. It was built in 1889, and is a two-story, three bay frame dwelling, with late-19th century additions. It sits on a brick foundation, triple gable roof, and has a one-story flat-roofed front porch with sawnwork decoration.

Thomas Jerkins House United States historic place

Thomas Jerkins House is a historic home located at New Bern, Craven County, North Carolina. It was built about 1849, and is a two-story, three bay, side-hall plan, Italianate style frame dwelling. It has a gable roof with overhanging eaves, a full-width porch, and a two-story ell.

Thomas A. Crews House United States historic place

Thomas A. Crews House is a historic home located at Walkertown, Forsyth County, North Carolina. It was built 1891, and is a two-story, vernacular Queen Anne style frame dwelling, enlarged to its present size in 1911. It features a one-story, shed-roofed, wrap-around porch. Also on the property are the contributing brick wash house (1891), a frame smokehouse (1891), barn (1891), pump house, chicken house, wood shed, equipment shed or "gear house," and the 65 foot brick smokestack of the former Crews Tobacco Factory (1891).

Harden Thomas Martin House United States historic place

Harden Thomas Martin House is a historic home located at Greensboro, Guilford County, North Carolina. It was built in 1909, and is a 2 1/2-story, double pile, Colonial Revival style frame dwelling. It consists of a main block with shallow, gable-roofed projections; two one-story, hip-roofed rear wings; and a porte-cochere. The front facade features a bowed, two-story portico supported by four fluted Ionic order columns with large terra cotta capitals. Also on the property are two contributing frame outbuildings.

Dr. Roscius P. and Mary Mitchell Thomas House and Outbuildings United States historic place

Dr. Roscius P. and Mary Mitchell Thomas House and Outbuildings, also known as the Ruth Thomas Home Farm, is a historic home located near Bethlehem, Hertford County, North Carolina. The house was built in 1887, and is a two-story, three-bay, single-pile, side-gable roof, Late Victorian style frame dwelling with a two-story, gable-roof rear ell. Built into the ell is a Greek Revival style kitchen building. The house is sheathed in weatherboard, sits on a brick foundation, and has a one-story half-hip roof porch. Also on the property are the contributing doctor's office, smoke house, and root cellar.

Thomas J. Murray House United States historic place

Thomas J. Murray House, also known as Rice Place, is a historic home located near Mars Hill, Madison County, North Carolina. It was built about 1894, and is a two-story, three-bay, single-pile frame I-house. It has a side-gabled roof, is set on a rubble stone-pier foundation, and has a full-width shed roofed front porch. Also on the property are the contributing gable-roofed livestock barn and a large gambrel roofed tobacco barn.

Amis-Bragg House United States historic place

Amis-Bragg House is a historic home located at Jackson, Northampton County, North Carolina. It was built about 1840, and is a two-story, five bay, single-pile Greek Revival style frame house with a two-story ell and one-story kitchen wing. It has a hipped roof and interior end chimneys. It was the home of Thomas Bragg Jr. (1810-1872), North Carolina governor and member of the United States Senate, purchased the house in 1843 and lived here until 1855.

Gen. Thomas Boykin House United States historic place

Gen. Thomas Boykin House is a historic home located near Clinton, Sampson County, North Carolina. It was built about 1810, and is a large two-story, hall-and-parlor plan, vernacular Federal style frame dwelling. It has a side gable roof, is sheathed in weatherboard, and has a later one-story, two-roam wing. It was the residence of General Thomas Boykin (1785-1859), Captain in War of 1812, later a General in the Militia and a three term member of the North Carolina General Assembly.

Troy Herring House United States historic place

Troy Herring House is a historic home located at Roseboro, Sampson County, North Carolina. It was built in 1912, and is a two-story, three bay by five bay, Classical Revival style frame dwelling with a truncated hipped roof. The front features a two-story central portico, with paired and fluted Ionic order columns and a one-story wraparound porch with Ionic order capitals. The house is similar to one built by Troy Herring's first cousin Robert Herring of Roseboro in 1916.

Pugh-Boykin House United States historic place

Pugh-Boykin House is a historic home located at Clinton, Sampson County, North Carolina. It was built about 1855, and is a two-story, double-pile, side hall plan, Greek Revival style frame dwelling. It has a hipped roof, hip roof porch, and paneled corner pilasters.

Murphy-Lamb House and Cemetery United States historic place

Murphy-Lamb House and Cemetery is a historic plantation house located near Garland, Sampson County, North Carolina. The house was built about 1835, and is a two-story, five bay by two bay, single pile Federal style frame dwelling. It has a brick pier foundation, side gable roof, and engaged front porch with a shed roof and engaged rear shed. The interior follows a hall-and-parlor plan. Also on the property is the contributing family cemetery. It is identical in form to the Samuel Johnson House.

Samuel Johnson House and Cemetery United States historic place

Samuel Johnson House and Cemetery is a historic plantation house located near Ingold, Sampson County, North Carolina. The house was built about 1840, and is a 2 1/2-story, five bay by three bay, single pile Late Federal style frame dwelling. It has a brick pier foundation, side gable roof, and engaged front porch with a shed roof and engaged rear shed. The interior follows a hall-and-parlor plan. Also on the property is the contributing family cemetery. It is identical in form to the Murphy-Lamb House.

Marshall Kornegay House and Cemetery United States historic place

Marshall Kornegay House and Cemetery is a historic plantation house located near Suttontown, Sampson County, North Carolina. The house was built about 1835, and is a 2 1/2-story, four bay by three bay, transitional Federal / Greek Revival style frame dwelling. It has a gable roof, rear ell, and one-story hip roofed front porch. The interior follows a hall-and-parlor plan. The house was restored in 1980-1981. Also on the property is a contributing family cemetery.

Dan E. Caison Sr. House United States historic place

Dan E. Caison Sr. House is an historic home located at Roseboro, Sampson County, North Carolina. The house was built in 1924, and is a two-story, Bungalow / American Craftsman style frame dwelling. It has a gable roof with exposed projecting rafters and triangular brackets, porte cochere, and a wrap-around porch with an intersecting gable roof. Also on the property are the contributing garage and small maid's house.

Isaac Williams House United States historic place

Isaac Williams House is a historic home located near Newton Grove, Sampson County, North Carolina. The farmhouse was built about 1867, and is a one-story, double-pile, five bay-by-four bay, transitional "Triple-A" frame dwelling, with Greek Revival style design elements. It has a prominent front cross-gable roof and hip roofed, three bay, front porch. A 1 1/2-story rear ell was added about 1980. Also on the property are the contributing servants quarters, family cemetery, and surrounding fields and woodlands.

Mag Blue House United States historic place

Mag Blue House is a historic home near Laurinburg, Scotland County, North Carolina. It was built in 1836, and is a 1 1/2-story, five bay by three bay, frame Coastal Cottage form dwelling, with Federal style decorative elements. It has a one-story gabled roof kitchen/dining room wing. It features a dominant gable roof that extends to shelter the full-width front porch, flush sheathing across the porch facade, and a hall-and-parlor plan.

Villa Nova (Laurinburg, North Carolina) United States historic place

Villa Nova, also known as The Captain Stephen M. Thomas House, is a historic home located near Laurinburg, Scotland County, North Carolina. It was built in 1880, and is a two-story, three bay by one bay, Italianate style brick dwelling, with one-story gabled roof ells. It has a free-standing one-story brick kitchen connected by a covered passage. It has a one-story front porch with a red and blue patterned grey slate roof.

Thomas J. Gill House United States historic place

Thomas J. Gill House is a historic home located at Laurinburg, Scotland County, North Carolina. It was built in 1904, and is a 2 1/2-story, three bay by three bay, frame dwelling, with Stick Style and Bungalow design elements. The interior is in the Colonial Revival style. It has a hipped roof, exterior stucco and brackets, and full-width front porch. Also on the property is a contributing gazebo. It was the home of North Carolina State Treasurer Edwin M. Gill (1899-1978).

Thomas B. Finley House United States historic place

The Thomas B. Finley House, also known as The Oaks, is a historic home located at North Wilkesboro, Wilkes County, North Carolina. It was designed by architect Norma Bonniwell (1877–1961) and built in 1893. It is a two-story, Queen Anne style frame dwelling with a one-story rear ell. It features a hip and gable roof, corner tower, fish-scale-cut wood shingles, and one-story, hip-roofed, wraparound porch. It was built for prominent attorney Thomas B. Finley (1862–1942), whose firm Finley and Hendren occupied the Thomas B. Finley Law Office at Wilkesboro.

References

  1. 1 2 "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places . National Park Service. 2010-07-09.
  2. Frances P. Alexander (October 1999). "Thomas and Latitia Gluyas House" (pdf). National Register of Historic Places - Nomination and Inventory. North Carolina State Historic Preservation Office. Retrieved 2015-02-01.