Thomas de Kirkcudbright

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Thomas de Kirkcudbright
Bishop of Galloway
Church Roman Catholic Church
See Diocese of Galloway
In office 1294–1324×1326
Predecessor Henry of Holyrood
Successor Simon de Wedale
Orders
Consecration 10 October 1294
Personal details
Born unknown
Probably Galloway or Dumfriesshire
Died 4 April 1324 × 23 September 1326

Thomas de Kirkcudbright, also known as Thomas de Dalton [de Daltoun], was a medieval prelate from the Kingdom of Scotland. He was apparently a nutritus, or foster son, of Robert V de Brus, Lord of Annandale, and seems to have been closely linked in some way to Adam de Kirkcudbright, the man who held the church of Dalton in Annandale. [1] He was likely a native Galwegian or perhaps a native of Annandale. [1]

Kingdom of Scotland historic sovereign kingdom on the British Isles from the 9th century and up to 1707

The Kingdom of Scotland was a sovereign state in northwest Europe traditionally said to have been founded in 843. Its territories expanded and shrank, but it came to occupy the northern third of the island of Great Britain, sharing a land border to the south with the Kingdom of England. It suffered many invasions by the English, but under Robert I it fought a successful war of independence and remained an independent state throughout the late Middle Ages. In 1603, James VI of Scotland became King of England, joining Scotland with England in a personal union. In 1707, the two kingdoms were united to form the Kingdom of Great Britain under the terms of the Acts of Union. Following the annexation of the Northern Isles from the Kingdom of Norway in 1472 and final capture of the Royal Burgh of Berwick by the Kingdom of England in 1482, the territory of the Kingdom of Scotland corresponded to that of modern-day Scotland, bounded by the North Sea to the east, the Atlantic Ocean to the north and west, and the North Channel and Irish Sea to the southwest.

Robert de Brus, 5th Lord of Annandale Regent of Scotland, and a competitor for the Scottish throne

Robert V de Brus, 5th Lord of Annandale, was a feudal lord, Justice and Constable of Scotland and England, a Regent of Scotland, and a competitor for the Scottish throne in 1290/92 in the Great Cause. His grandson Robert the Bruce eventually became King of Scots.

Lord of Annandale Wikimedia list article

The Lord of Annandale was a sub-comital lordship in southern Scotland (Annandale) established by David I of Scotland by 1124 for his follower Robert de Brus. The following were holders of the officers:

As the chaplain of Robert de Brus, he was elected by the chapter of Whithorn Cathedral to replace the recently deceased Henry of Holyrood as Bishop of Galloway, sometime before 13 January 1294. [2] He offered obedience to the Archbishop of York on 30 May and was consecrated on 10 October. [3] His election was initially opposed by John Balliol, King of the Scots, though John was eventually reconciled to the election. [1] By the time of his election to the bishopric, he was already a priest and was styled magister, indicating the completion of a university education - though not details of his university education are not known. [1]

Chaplain Provider of pastoral care, often a minister of a religious tradition, attached to an institution

A chaplain is, traditionally, a cleric, or a lay representative of a religious tradition, attached to a secular institution such as a hospital, prison, military unit, school, labor union, business, police department, fire department, university, or private chapel.

Chapter (religion) body of clergy in Roman Catholic, Anglican, and Nordic Lutheran churches

A chapter is one of several bodies of clergy in Roman Catholic, Anglican, and Nordic Lutheran churches or their gatherings.

Henry of Holyrood Scottish bishop

Henry was a 13th-century Augustinian abbot and bishop, most notable for holding the positions of Abbot of Holyrood and Bishop of Galloway.

Although naturally better disposed to the Bruces than Balliols, his exact role during the turbulence of the First War of Scottish Independence is not clear; after the deposition of Balliol by King Edward I of England, he was co-operative with the English crown, both in his role as a senior inhabitant of the Kingdom of Scotland and as a suffragan of the Archbishop of York. [4] He spent a great deal of time in this period both in Galloway, and in England, and was a close associate of John de Halton, Bishop of Carlisle. [4] The latter, a papal tax collector, granted Thomas a £40 loan from the papal funds stored at Tongland Abbey, in August 1294, undoubtedly related to his accession as Bishop of Galloway. [1]

First War of Scottish Independence war between English and Scottish forces

The First War of Scottish Independence was the initial chapter of engagements in a series of warring periods between English and Scottish forces lasting from the invasion by England in 1296 until the de jure restoration of Scottish independence with the Treaty of Edinburgh-Northampton in 1328. De facto independence was established in 1314 at the Battle of Bannockburn. England attempted to establish its authority over Scotland while the Scots fought to keep English rule and authority out of Scotland.

Edward I of England 13th and 14th-century King of England and Duke of Aquitaine

Edward I, also known as Edward Longshanks and the Hammer of the Scots, was King of England from 1272 to 1307. Before his accession to the throne, he was commonly referred to as The Lord Edward. The first son of Henry III, Edward was involved early in the political intrigues of his father's reign, which included an outright rebellion by the English barons. In 1259, he briefly sided with a baronial reform movement, supporting the Provisions of Oxford. After reconciliation with his father, however, he remained loyal throughout the subsequent armed conflict, known as the Second Barons' War. After the Battle of Lewes, Edward was hostage to the rebellious barons, but escaped after a few months and joined the fight against Simon de Montfort. Montfort was defeated at the Battle of Evesham in 1265, and within two years the rebellion was extinguished. With England pacified, Edward joined the Ninth Crusade to the Holy Land. The crusade accomplished little, and Edward was on his way home in 1272 when he was informed that his father had died. Making a slow return, he reached England in 1274 and was crowned at Westminster Abbey on 19 August.

Galloway area in southwestern Scotland

Galloway is a region in southwestern Scotland comprising the historic counties of Wigtownshire and Kirkcudbrightshire.

It came to be thought by some York authorities that he had never adhered to the cause of King Robert I of Scotland, when they called him to a council on this basis on 5 March 1323. [5] Bishop Thomas however had spent a lot of time in the post-Bannockburn kingdom, attending the Ayr assembly of 27 April 1315, where he added his seal to a declaration about the Bruce succession; he added his seal to another pro-Bruce document at some point between October 1314 and November 1316, and attended the Scone parliament of 3 December 1318. [6] His date of death is unknown exactly, but it was after 4 April 1324, and had occurred by 23 September 1326, when his successor Simon de Wedale was elected to succeed him. [7]

Battle of Bannockburn 1314 battle during the First War of Scottish Independence

The Battle of Bannockburn on 23 and 24 June 1314 was a Scottish victory by King of Scots Robert the Bruce against the army of King Edward II of England in the First War of Scottish Independence. Though it did not bring overall victory in the war, which would go on for 14 more years, it was a landmark in Scottish history.

Ayr town and former Royal Burgh situated on the west coast of Ayrshire in the Scotland

Ayr is a town situated on the south-west coast of Scotland. It is the administrative centre of the South Ayrshire council area and the historic county town of Ayrshire. With a population of 46,490 in 2015, Ayr is the largest settlement in Ayrshire and the 14th largest settlement in Scotland. The town is continuous with the smaller town of Prestwick to the north.

Scone, Scotland village in Perth and Kinross, Scotland

Scone is a village in Perth and Kinross, Scotland. The medieval village of Scone, which grew up around the monastery and royal residence, was abandoned in the early 19th century when the residents were removed and a new palace was built on the site by the Earl of Mansfield. Hence the modern village of Scone, and the medieval village of Old Scone, can often be distinguished.

Notes

  1. 1 2 3 4 5 Watt, Dictionary, p. 308.
  2. Watt, Fasti Ecclesiae, p. 129.
  3. Watt, Fasti Ecclesiae, pp. 129-30.
  4. 1 2 Watt, Dictionary, pp. 308-9.
  5. Watt, Fasti Ecclesiae, p. 130.
  6. Watt, Dictionary, p. 310.
  7. This date differs significantly from that given in Dowden, Bishops, p. 360, who thought him to be dead by 1320; this however is based on an error: see Watt, Dictionary, p. 310; Watt, Fasti Ecclesiae, p. 130;

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References

John Dowden Bishop of Edinburgh; Irish Anglican/Episcopalian bishop

John Dowden DD LLD was an Irish-born bishop and ecclesiastical historian. He served in the Scottish Episcopal Church as the Bishop of Edinburgh.

Donald Elmslie Robertson Watt FRSE was a Scottish historian and Professor Emeritus at St Andrews University.

Religious titles
Preceded by
Henry of Holyrood
Bishop of Galloway
1294–1324×1326
Succeeded by
Simon de Wedale