George Vaus

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George Vaus (died 1508) was a Scottish prelate from the late 15th and early 16th century. Possessing a master's degree, he became a cleric, parson of Wigtown and on 9 December 1482, he was provided the bishopric of Galloway. He was consecrated by 9 October 1483, when he appeared before the lords auditors on behalf of Patrick Vaus,[ clarification needed ] the future Prior of Whithorn for whom George was tutor; Patrick was involved in a suit concerning certain lands, a suit which ended in the Vaus' favour. In 1504, he became Dean of the Chapel Royal at Stirling, a position with which bishops of Galloway were thereafter associated. The date of his death is not known precisely, but King James IV of Scotland attended a mass for the soul of the bishop on 30 January 1508. It is likely that Vaus' death occurred shortly before this.

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    Religious titles
    Preceded by Bishop of Galloway
    1482–1508
    Succeeded by
    Preceded by Dean of the Chapel Royal
    1504–1508
    Succeeded by