Thomasina

Last updated

Thomasina or Thomasine is the feminine form of the given name Thomas, which means "twin". Thomasina is also the title for reprint versions of the book Thomasina, the Cat Who Thought She Was God .

Given name name typically used to differentiate people from the same family, clan, or other social group who have a common last name

A given name is a part of a person's personal name. It identifies a specific person, and differentiates that person from the other members of a group who have a common surname. The term given name refers to the fact that the name usually is bestowed upon a person, normally to a child by his or her parents at or close to the time of birth. A Christian name, a first name which historically was given at baptism, is now also typically given by the parents at birth.

Thomas (name) male given name

Thomas is recorded in the Greek New Testament as the name of Thomas the Apostle. It is ultimately derived from the Aramaic personal name תאומא, meaning "twin," and the English spelling Thomas is a transliteration of the Greek Θωμάς.

<i>Thomasina, the Cat Who Thought She Was God</i> book by Paul Gallico

Thomasina, the Cat Who Thought She Was God or Thomasina is a 1957 novel by Paul Gallico about a cat, owned by a child whose strict father must learn that love is powerful enough to help others. The book was adapted for the 1963 Disney film The Three Lives of Thomasina.

Contents

Thomasina is often shortened to Tamsin. Tamsin can be used as a name in itself; variants of Tamsin include Tamsyn, Tamzin, Tamsen, Tammi and Tamasin. Although Aramaic in origin, the version "Tamsin" is especially popular in Cornwall and Wales. Along with Tamara it is the ancestor of "Tammy".

Cornwall County of England

Cornwall is a county in South West England in the United Kingdom. The county is bordered to the north and west by the Celtic Sea, to the south by the English Channel, and to the east by the county of Devon, over the River Tamar which forms most of the border between them. Cornwall forms the westernmost part of the South West Peninsula of the island of Great Britain. The furthest southwestern point of Great Britain is Land's End; the southernmost point is Lizard Point. Cornwall has a population of 563,600 and covers an area of 3,563 km2 (1,376 sq mi). The county has been administered since 2009 by the unitary authority, Cornwall Council. The ceremonial county of Cornwall also includes the Isles of Scilly, which are administered separately. The administrative centre of Cornwall, and its only city, is Truro.

Wales Country in northwest Europe, part of the United Kingdom

Wales is a country that is part of the United Kingdom and the island of Great Britain. It is bordered by England to the east, the Irish Sea to the north and west, and the Bristol Channel to the south. It had a population in 2011 of 3,063,456 and has a total area of 20,779 km2 (8,023 sq mi). Wales has over 1,680 miles (2,700 km) of coastline and is largely mountainous, with its higher peaks in the north and central areas, including Snowdon, its highest summit. The country lies within the north temperate zone and has a changeable, maritime climate.

Tammy is a feminine given name. It can be a short form of the names Tamsin, Thomasina, or Tamar, Tamara or Tabitha. Tamsin and Thomasina are feminine versions of the name Thomas, a Greek form of the Aramaic name Te'oma, meaning twin. Tamara is a Russian form of the Hebrew name Tamar, which means "palm tree." In Israel "Tammy" (תמי) is commonly used as an abbreviation of the original Hebrew name.

People named Thomasina (and variants)

Tammy Beaumont cricketer

Tamsin Tilley Beaumont is an English cricketer. She opens the batting for Kent Women, and keeps wicket.

Tamsin Blanchard is a British fashion journalist, author, and lecturer. She is particularly known for her work on sustainability and ecological issues in fashion.

George Donner was the leader of the Donner Party, a group of California-bound American settlers who became snow covered in the Sierra Nevada of Alta California, Mexico in the winter of 1846–1847. Nearly half of the party starved to death, and some of the emigrants resorted to cannibalism.

Fictional Thomasinas

Beatrix Potter English childrens writer and illustrator

Helen Beatrix Potter was an English writer, illustrator, natural scientist, and conservationist best known for her children's books featuring animals, such as those in The Tale of Peter Rabbit.

<i>The Tale of Mrs. Tittlemouse</i> childrens book written and illustrated by Beatrix Potter

The Tale of Mrs. Tittlemouse is a children's book written and illustrated by Beatrix Potter, and published by Frederick Warne & Co. in 1910. The tale is about housekeeping and insect pests in the home, and reflects Potter's own sense of tidiness and her abhorrence of insect infestations. The character of Mrs. Thomasina Tittlemouse debuted in 1909 in a small but crucial role in The Tale of The Flopsy Bunnies, and Potter decided to give her a tale of her own the following year. Her meticulous illustrations of the insects may have been drawn for their own sake, or to provoke horror and disgust in her juvenile readers. 25,000 copies of the tale were initially released in July 1910 and another 15,000 between November 1910 and November 1911 in Potter's typical small book format.

<i>The Return of the Native</i> novel by Thomas Hardy

The Return of the Native is Thomas Hardy's sixth published novel. It first appeared in the magazine Belgravia, a publication known for its sensationalism, and was presented in twelve monthly installments from January to December 1878. Because of the novel's controversial themes, Hardy had some difficulty finding a publisher; reviews, however, though somewhat mixed, were generally positive. In the twentieth century, The Return of the Native became one of Hardy's most popular and highly regarded novels.

Similar names

Related Research Articles

Paul Gallico American writer and journalist

Paul William Gallico was an American novelist, short story and sports writer. Many of his works were adapted for motion pictures. He is perhaps best remembered for The Snow Goose, his only real critical success, and for the novel The Poseidon Adventure, primarily through the 1972 film adaptation.

Amanda is a Latin female gerundive name meaning "deserving to be loved," "worthy of love," or "loved very much by everyone." Its diminutive form includes Mandy, Manda and Amy.

Tammi Terrell American recording artist

Tammi Terrell was an American recording artist, best known as a star singer for Motown Records during the 1960s, most notably for a series of duets with singer Marvin Gaye. Terrell's career began as a teenager, first recording for Scepter/Wand Records, before spending nearly two years as a member of James Brown's Revue, recording for Brown's Try Me label. After a period attending college, Terrell recorded briefly for Checker Records, before signing with Motown in 1965. With Gaye, Terrell scored seven Top 40 singles on the Billboard Hot 100, including "Ain't No Mountain High Enough", "Ain't Nothing Like the Real Thing" and "You're All I Need to Get By". Terrell's career was interrupted when she collapsed into Gaye's arms as the two performed at a concert at Hampden–Sydney College on October 14, 1967, with Terrell later being diagnosed with a brain tumor. She had eight unsuccessful surgeries before succumbing to the illness on March 16, 1970 at the age of 24.

Tamsin Greig English actress

Tamsin Margaret Mary Greig is an English actress and comedienne. She played Fran Katzenjammer in Black Books, Dr Caroline Todd in Green Wing and Beverly Lincoln in the British-American sitcom Episodes. She currently stars as Jackie in the Channel 4 sitcom Friday Night Dinner. Other roles include Alice Chenery in BBC One's comedy drama Love Soup, Debbie Aldridge in BBC Radio 4's soap opera The Archers, Miss Bates in the 2009 BBC version of Jane Austen's Emma, and Beth Hardiment in the 2010 film version of Tamara Drewe. Greig is also an acclaimed stage actress; she won a Laurence Olivier Award for Best Actress in 2007 for Much Ado About Nothing, and was nominated again in 2011 and 2015 for her roles in The Little Dog Laughed and Women on the Verge of a Nervous Breakdown. She is married to the actor Richard Leaf and has three children.

"Tammy" is a popular song with music by Jay Livingston and lyrics by Ray Evans. It was published in 1957 and made its debut in the film Tammy and the Bachelor. It was nominated for the 1957 Academy Award for Best Original Song. "Tammy" is heard in the film in two versions. The one that became a number one hit single for Debbie Reynolds in 1957 is heard midway through the film, and was a UK No. 2 hit single in the same year. The version that used for the film's main titles was a hit for the Ames Brothers; there have also been several other cover versions of the song.

<i>The Three Lives of Thomasina</i> 1964 film by Don Chaffey

The Three Lives of Thomasina is a 1963 American-British fantasy film directed by Don Chaffey and starring Patrick McGoohan, Susan Hampshire, child actor Matthew Garber and child actress Karen Dotrice in a story about a cat and her influence on a family. The screenplay was written by Robert Westerby and Paul Gallico. It was based upon Gallico's 1957 novel Thomasina, the Cat Who Thought She Was God. The film was shot in Inveraray, Argyll, Scotland, and Pinewood Studios, England.

Tamara Townsend is an American actress and singer. Townsend is best known for her roles as Wendy Reardon on the NBC daytime soap opera Days of Our Lives (1994–96); Greta McClure, Eddie's girlfriend on the ABC/CBS sitcom Family Matters (1995–98). From 2015 to early 2018, she starred as Kira Cooper, the mother of K.C. Cooper, on the Disney Channel series K.C. Undercover.

Cole is a surname of English origin, and is much less frequently a given name. It is of Middle English origin, and its meaning is "swarthy, coal-black, charcoal". The Cole family originated in Cornwall, South West England. The first recorded spelling of the family name is shown to be that of Randolphi Cole, appearing in the Winton Rolls of Hampshire in 1148.

Peta is a feminine given name which may refer to: helping animals

Tamara is a female given name most commonly derived from the Biblical name "Tamar", meaning "date", "date palm" or "palm tree." In eastern European countries like Armenia, Czech Republic, Georgia, Macedonia, Russia, Croatia, Serbia, Slovenia, Poland and Ukraine it has been a common name for centuries. In Australia it was very popular from the 1960s to 1990s.

Tamar is a female name of Hebrew origin, meaning "date", "date palm" or just "palm tree". There are three characters in the Bible with this name. The pronunciation of Tamar depends on each so-named person's language, culture, and idiolectic preference; typical pronunciations in English are and. Variants include Tamary and "Tamara".

Hope is a Scottish and Norwegian surname. Notable people with the surname include:

Hannah, also spelt Hanna, Hana or Chana, is a Hebrew given name. It is derived from the root ḥ-n-n, meaning "favour" or "grace"; A Dictionary of First Names attributes the name to a word meaning 'He (God) has favoured me [with a child]'.

Kent is a surname, and may refer to:

Jackson is a common surname of English and Scottish origin. It literally means "son of Jack". In 1980 Jackson was the 24th most popular surname in England and Wales. In the 1990 United States Census, Jackson was the thirteenth most frequently reported surname, accounting for 0.3% of the population.

Daisy (given name) Name list

Daisy is a feminine given name, commonly thought to be derived from the name of the flower. The flower name comes from the Old English word dægeseage, meaning "day's eye". The name Daisy is therefore ultimately derived from this source. Daisy is also a nickname for Margaret, used because Marguerite, the French version of that name, is also a French name for the oxeye daisy. It came into popular use in the late Victorian era along with other flower names. Authors Linda Rosenkrantz and Pamela Redmond Satran wrote in their 2007 book Baby Name Bible that Daisy has a "fresh, wholesome, and energetic" image. The name has been used for literary characters such as Daisy Miller, the title character of the novella by Henry James, and for television characters such as Daisy Duke on The Dukes of Hazzard. Very short, form-fitting, denim cut-off jeans shorts are named Daisy Dukes after this character.

Georgina is a given name and the feminine form of George, along with Georgia and Georgiana. It comes from the Greek word Γεωργιος, meaning farmer. It may refer to:

Mackenzie, MacKenzie and McKenzie are Scottish surnames. It was originally pronounced [məˈkɛŋjiː] in Scots, with the "z" representing the old Middle Scots letter, yogh. The names are anglicised forms of the Scottish Gaelic MacCoinnich, which is a patronymic form of the personal name Coinneach, anglicised as Kenneth. The personal name means "comely".