Thomasina

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Thomasina or Thomasine is the feminine form of the given name Thomas, which means "twin". Thomasina is often shortened to Tamsin. Tamsin can be used as a name in itself; variants of Tamsin include Tamsyn, Tamzin, Tamsen, Tammi and Tamasin. Although Aramaic in origin, the version "Tamsin" is especially popular in Cornwall and Wales. Along with Tamara it is the ancestor of "Tammy".

Contents

People named Thomasina (and variants)

Tammi

Tammie

Tammy

Tamsen

Tamsin

Tamsyn

Tamzin

Thomasin

Thomasina

Thomasine

Fictional Thomasinas

Similar names

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References

  1. Sansom, C. J. (2008). Sovereign by C. J. Sansom - Reading Guide. PenguinRandomhouse.com. ISBN   9780143113171 . Retrieved 6 January 2022.