Thornton-le-Street

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Thornton-le-Street
Former public house at Thornton le Street - geograph.org.uk - 405952.jpg
Former public house at Thornton-le-Street
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Thornton-le-Street
Location within North Yorkshire
Population90 (NYCC) [1]
OS grid reference SE413862
District
Shire county
Region
Country England
Sovereign state United Kingdom
Post town THIRSK
Postcode district YO7
Police North Yorkshire
Fire North Yorkshire
Ambulance Yorkshire
EU Parliament Yorkshire and the Humber
UK Parliament
List of places
UK
England
Yorkshire
54°16′13″N1°21′59″W / 54.270359°N 1.366258°W / 54.270359; -1.366258 Coordinates: 54°16′13″N1°21′59″W / 54.270359°N 1.366258°W / 54.270359; -1.366258

Thornton-le-Street is a village and parochial and civil parish in the Hambleton district of North Yorkshire, England. It is part of the civil parish of Thornton-le-Moor and Thornton-le-Street for District purposes. [2] As the population remained less 100 at the 2011 Census details are included in the civil parish of Thornton-le-Moor. [3] In 2015, North Yorkshire County Council estimated the population to have been 90. [1]

Civil parish Territorial designation and lowest tier of local government in England

In England, a civil parish is a type of administrative parish used for local government, they are a territorial designation which is the lowest tier of local government below districts and counties, or their combined form, the unitary authority. Civil parishes can trace their origin to the ancient system of ecclesiastical parishes which historically played a role in both civil and ecclesiastical administration; civil and religious parishes were formally split into two types in the 19th century and are now entirely separate. The unit was devised and rolled out across England in the 1860s.

Hambleton District District in England

Hambleton is a local government district of North Yorkshire, England. The main town and administrative centre is Northallerton, and the district also includes the market towns and major villages of Bedale, Thirsk, Great Ayton, Stokesley, and Easingwold.

North Yorkshire County of England

North Yorkshire is a non-metropolitan county and the largest ceremonial county in England by area. It is located primarily in the region of Yorkshire and the Humber but partly in the region of North East England. The estimated population of North Yorkshire was 602,300 in mid-2016.

Contents

Thornton-le-Street is situated about 3 miles (4.8 km) north of Thirsk and about 5.3 miles (8.5 km) south east of the county town of Northallerton. The whole village is within the site of the old medieval village and designated and Ancient Monument under the terms of the Ancient Monuments and Archaeological Areas Act 1979. [4] It is located between the west bank of the Cod Beck and the A168 road between Thirsk and Northallerton.

Northallerton town in the Hambleton district of North Yorkshire, England

Northallerton is a market town and civil parish in the Hambleton district of North Yorkshire, England. It lies in the Vale of Mowbray and at the northern end of the Vale of York. It had a population of 15,741 according to the 2001 census, which had risen to 16,832 in 2011. It has served as the county town of the North Riding of Yorkshire and since 1974, of North Yorkshire. Northallerton is made up of four wards, North, Broomfield, Romanby and Central.

Ancient Monuments and Archaeological Areas Act 1979 Law in the UK

The Ancient Monuments and Archaeological Areas Act 1979 or AMAAA was a law passed by the UK government, the latest in a series of Ancient Monument Acts legislating to protect the archaeological heritage of England & Wales and Scotland. Northern Ireland has its own legislation.

Cod Beck, North Yorkshire

Cod Beck is a river in North Yorkshire, England. It has a catchment area of 209 km2 (81 sq mi).

History

The village is mentioned in the Domesday Book as Torentun in the Allerton hundred. The manor was the possession of Earl Edwin at the time of the Norman invasion. Afterwards it passed to the Crown who granted it to the manor of Northallerton whose lord was the Bishop of Durham. [5] In the 13th and 14th centuries, the main landowners were the de Wassand and de Wadesley families. In the 16th century the line of descent had altered through marriage to the Everingham's and then by sale to the Talbot's who held the title to the manor until 1793. It was briefly the possession of Samuel Crompton whose daughter inherited the manor where it passed down her husbands', Alan Frederick Cathcart, 3rd Earl Cathcart, line of descent. [6] [7]

Domesday Book 11th-century survey of landholding in England as well as the surviving manuscripts of the survey

Domesday Book is a manuscript record of the "Great Survey" of much of England and parts of Wales completed in 1086 by order of King William the Conqueror. The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle states:

Then, at the midwinter [1085], was the king in Gloucester with his council .... After this had the king a large meeting, and very deep consultation with his council, about this land; how it was occupied, and by what sort of men. Then sent he his men over all England into each shire; commissioning them to find out "How many hundreds of hides were in the shire, what land the king himself had, and what stock upon the land; or, what dues he ought to have by the year from the shire."

Edwin was the elder brother of Morcar, Earl of Northumbria, son of Ælfgār, Earl of Mercia and grandson of Leofric, Earl of Mercia. He succeeded to his father's title and responsibilities on Ælfgār's death in 1062. He appears as Earl Edwin in the Domesday Book.

Sir Samuel Crompton, 1st Baronet was a politician in the United Kingdom. He served as a Member for Parliament for East Retford, Derby and Thirsk. He also served as Deputy Lieutenant for the North Riding of Yorkshire.

The name is derived from Old English words þorn and tūn combined with the Anglian word, strēt to give the meaning of Thorn tree farm on a Roman road. The suffix of le-street was used to distinguish it from other Thornton's in the area. [8] [9]

Old English, or Anglo-Saxon, is the earliest historical form of the English language, spoken in England and southern and eastern Scotland in the early Middle Ages. It was brought to Great Britain by Anglo-Saxon settlers probably in the mid-5th century, and the first Old English literary works date from the mid-7th century. After the Norman conquest of 1066, English was replaced, for a time, as the language of the upper classes by Anglo-Norman, a relative of French. This is regarded as marking the end of the Old English era, as during this period the English language was heavily influenced by Anglo-Norman, developing into a phase known now as Middle English.

The Anglic languages are a group of linguistic varieties including Old English and the languages descended from it. These include Middle English, Early Modern English, and Modern English; Early Scots, Middle Scots, and Modern Scots; and the now extinct Yola and Fingallian in Ireland.

Governance

The village is within the Thirsk and Malton UK Parliament constituency. It lies within the Thorntons ward of Hambleton District Council and Sowerby electoral division of North Yorkshire County Council. [10]

Geography

The village is located between the west bank of the Cod Beck and the A168 road between Thirsk and Northallerton. Within a radius of 2.5 miles (4 km) can be found the settlements of Thornton-le-Moor, Borrowby, Knayton, Upsall, South Kilvington, Newsham and South Otterington. The mean elevation in the village is 154 feet (47 m). [10]

Thornton-le-Moor village in the United Kingdom

Thornton-le-Moor is a village and civil parish in the Hambleton district of North Yorkshire, England, situated equidistantly from the towns of Thirsk and Northallerton.

Borrowby, Hambleton Village and civil parish in North Yorkshire, England

Borrowby is a village and civil parish in the Hambleton district of North Yorkshire, England. It is situated halfway between Thirsk and Northallerton, about 25 miles (40 km) north of York, in the Vale of Mowbray, a low-lying agricultural landscape shaped by the last glaciation, that lies between two national parks, the North York Moors to the east and the Yorkshire Dales to the west.

Knayton village in United Kingdom

Knayton is a small village in Hambleton district of North Yorkshire, England. It is located north of Thirsk just off the A19. It is linked with the hamlet of Brawith, approximately 1 mile away. The Dog and Gun public house faces the village green and the village hall. There is also a caravan park and bus stop but no scheduled service. Knayton is also the home of The Hillside Rural Activities Park (HRAP) with a cricket pitch, 3 tennis courts, 2 football pitches and is the permanent home of Borrowby show. In 2012 The Willowman Festival was held on the park.

The abandoned medieval village, fishponds and manorial site complete with a moat, are now little more than earthwork banks, but with well preserved below-ground remains. The old route of the main street which follows that of the old Roman road can be traced from the end of the existing main street running towards the eastern side of Old Hall. [6] [10]

Religion

St Leonard's Church, Thornton-le-Street St Leonard's Church, Thornton-le-Street - geograph.org.uk - 1805429.jpg
St Leonard's Church, Thornton-le-Street

The village church is dedicated to St Leonard and is a grade II* listed building. The oldest parts indicate it was built in the 12th century with modifications in the 14th and 19th centuries. [11]

Related Research Articles

Sowerby, North Yorkshire village and civil parish in North Yorkshire, UK

Sowerby is a small village, electoral ward and civil parish in the Hambleton district of North Yorkshire, England, it is situated immediately south of Thirsk. The parish boundary merges with that of Thirsk, so the village could be described as a suburb. The author James Herriot lived in the village.

Thirsk market town and civil parish in the Hambleton district of North Yorkshire, England

Thirsk is a small market town and civil parish in the Hambleton district of North Yorkshire, England. Historically part of the North Riding of Yorkshire, it is 8 miles (13 km) south-south east of the county town of Northallerton.

Coxwold village and civil parish in the Hambleton district of North Yorkshire, England

Coxwold is a village and civil parish in the Hambleton district of North Yorkshire, England and located within the North York Moors National Park. It is situated 18 miles north of York and is where the Rev. Laurence Sterne wrote A Sentimental Journey.

Ainderby Steeple village in United Kingdom

Ainderby Steeple is a village and civil parish in the Hambleton District of North Yorkshire, England. Ainderby Steeple is situated on the A684 approximately 2.6 miles (4.2 km) south-west of the County Town of Northallerton, and to the immediate east of Morton-on-Swale.

Thornton-le-Dale village in North Yorkshire, England, United Kingdom

Thornton-le-Dale is a village and civil parish in the Ryedale district of North Yorkshire, England, about 3 miles (5 km) east of Pickering on the edge of the North York Moors National Park. The area of the village encompasses 39.2 square kilometres.

Linton-on-Ouse village in United Kingdom

Linton-on-Ouse is a village and civil parish in the Hambleton District of North Yorkshire, England, about eight miles north-west of York. It lies on the north bank of the River Ouse.

Topcliffe, North Yorkshire village and civil parish in the Hambleton district of North Yorkshire, England

Topcliffe is a village and civil parish in the Hambleton district of North Yorkshire, England. The village is situated on the River Swale, on the A167 road and close to the A168. It is about 5 miles (8.0 km) south-west of Thirsk and 11 miles (18 km) south of the county town of Northallerton. It has a population of 1,489. An Army Barracks, with a Royal Air Force airfield enclosed within, is located to the north of the village.

South Kilvington village in United Kingdom

South Kilvington is a village and civil parish in the Hambleton district of North Yorkshire, England. It is situated just off the A19, about one mile north of Thirsk.

Pickhill village in the United Kingdom

Pickhill is a village in North Yorkshire, England, 6 miles (10 km) west of Thirsk. It forms part of Hambleton district, and is the only village in the civil parish of Pickhill with Roxby.

Kirby Sigston village in United Kingdom

Kirby Sigston is a village and civil parish in the Hambleton district of North Yorkshire, England approximately 4 miles (6.4 km) east of Northallerton. The village is situated on Cod Beck, and the wider parish contains the hamlet of Jeater Houses due east of the village on the trunk A19 road. The village is mentioned in the Domesday Book as having 75 ploughlands and its name derives from a combination of the Old Norse Kirkju-býr and Siggs tūn. Sigston is also the name of a village nearby.

Sessay village in United Kingdom

Sessay is a small, linear village and civil parish in North Yorkshire, England. It is situated approximately 4 miles (6 km) south-east from Thirsk, and 2 miles (3 km) west from the A19 road close to the East Coast Main Line.

A168 road

The A168 is a major road in North Yorkshire, England. It runs from Northallerton to Wetherby, acting as a local access road for the A1(M).

Kirby Knowle village in United Kingdom

Kirby Knowle is a village and civil parish in Hambleton district of North Yorkshire, England, on the border of the North Yorkshire Moors and near Upsall, about 4 miles north-east of Thirsk. Historically part of the North Riding of Yorkshire, the population of the civil parish was estimated at 60 in 2014.

North Otterington village in United Kingdom

North Otterington is a village and civil parish on the east bank of the River Wiske, in the Hambleton district of North Yorkshire, England. The population of the village was estimated by North Yorkshire County Council as being 40, with a slight decline to 30 by 2015. Details are also included in the civil parish of Ainderby Steeple. It is on the A167 road and 3 miles (4.8 km) south of Northallerton; South Otterington is further south on the same road.

South Otterington village in United Kingdom

South Otterington is a village and civil parish in the Hambleton district of North Yorkshire, England. It is located on the A167 road 5 miles (8 km) south of Northallerton and on the east bank of the River Wiske.

Brandsby village in United Kingdom

Brandsby is a village in North Yorkshire, England. The village is the main constituent of the Brandsby-cum-Stearsby Civil Parish in the District of Hambleton. The village is mentioned in the Domesday book. It lies between Easingwold and Hovingham, some 12.3 miles (19.8 km) north of York.

References

  1. 1 2 "2015 Population Estimates Parishes" (PDF). northyorks.gov.uk. December 2016. p. 12. Retrieved 1 November 2019.
  2. "Parish Info". Archived from the original on 21 November 2012. Retrieved 15 February 2013.
  3. UK Census (2011). "Local Area Report – Thornton-le-Moor Parish (E04007281)". Nomis. Office for National Statistics . Retrieved 1 November 2019.
  4. Historic England. "Medieval settlement at Thornton-le-Street (1018853)". National Heritage List for England . Retrieved 24 June 2017.
  5. "Thornton [le Street] | Domesday Book". opendomesday.org. Retrieved 1 November 2019.
  6. 1 2 "Parish History" . Retrieved 15 February 2013.
  7. Bulmer's Topography, History and Directory (Private and Commercial) of North Yorkshire 1890. S&N Publishing. 1890. pp. 832–833. ISBN   1-86150-299-0.
  8. Watts (2011). Cambridge Dictionary of English Place-names. Cambridge University Press. pp. 610–11. ISBN   978-0521168557.
  9. A.D. Mills (1998). Dictionary of English Place-Names. Oxford Paperbacks. p. 459. ISBN   978-0192800749.
  10. 1 2 3 Ordnance Survey Open Viewer
  11. Historic England. "Church of St Leonard  (Grade II*) (1315196)". National Heritage List for England . Retrieved 1 November 2019.

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