Thryssa mystax

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Moustached thryssa
Thryssa mystax.jpg
Thryssa mystax
Scientific classification
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Species:
T. mystax
Binomial name
Thryssa mystax
(Bloch & Schneider, 1801) [2]
Synonyms
  • Clupea mystaxBloch & Schneider, 1801
  • Engraulis mystax(Bloch & Schneider, 1801)
  • Scutengraulis mystax(Bloch & Schneider, 1801)
  • Thrissocles mystax(Bloch & Schneider, 1801 )
  • Thrissa mystax(Bloch & Schneider, 1801)
  • Clupea subspinosaSwainson, 1839
  • Thryssa subspinosa(Swainson, 1839)
  • Thryssa poorawaJerdon, 1851
  • Thryssa poorawahJerdon, 1851
  • Engraulis mystacoidesBleeker, 1852
  • Stolephorus valenciennesiBleeker, 1866
  • Scutengraulis valenciennesi(Bleeker, 1866)
  • Thryssa valenciennesi(Bleeker, 1866)
  • Engraulis hornelliFowler, 1924

Thryssa mystax, the moustached thryssa or Gangetic anchovy, is a species of oceanodromous ray-finned fish in the family Engraulidae. It is found in the tropical western Indo-Pacific region from India, Sri Lanka to Myanmar and south to Java, and Indonesia. [1]

Engraulis mystax Achilles 157.jpg

It is a small schooling fish found in depth of 0-50m. Maximum length do not exceed 15.5 cm. The fish has 11 to 12 dorsal soft rays and only present 29 to 37 anal soft rays. There are 24 to 32 keeled scutes from isthmus to anus on belly region. Lower gill rakers are serrated. Body is silver, darker dorsally. There is a distinctive dark blotch behind upper part of gill opening, which can easily identify the species from other Thryssa species. Caudal fin is yellowish. [3] It feeds on planktons, fish larva, and small crustaceans like shrimp larva.

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References

  1. 1 2 Munroe, T.A. (2010). "Thryssa mystax". IUCN Red List of Threatened Species . IUCN. 2010: e.T155240A4755171. doi: 10.2305/IUCN.UK.2010-4.RLTS.T155240A4755171.en . Retrieved 15 January 2020.
  2. "Thryssa mystax (Bloch & Schneider, 1801)". FishBase. Retrieved 2015-05-18.
  3. "Field Guide to Lombok Island".