Thuborough

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Thuborough, east front, comprising "Thuborough House". The attached north-east block (behind right) comprises "Thuborough Barton" Thuborough Sutcombe Devon East Front.jpg
Thuborough, east front, comprising "Thuborough House". The attached north-east block (behind right) comprises "Thuborough Barton"
Thuborough, north front, comprising "Thuborough Barton" Thuborough Sutcombe Devon NorthFront.jpg
Thuborough, north front, comprising "Thuborough Barton"
Thuborough, south fronts, of "Thuborough Barton" (left) and of "Thuborough House" (right) Thuborough Sutcombe Devon SouthFronts.jpg
Thuborough, south fronts, of "Thuborough Barton" (left) and of "Thuborough House" (right)
Thuborough, west side. To the left (north) is "Thuborough Barton", to the right (south) is "Thuborough House" Thuborough Sutcombe Devon WestFront.jpg
Thuborough, west side. To the left (north) is "Thuborough Barton", to the right (south) is "Thuborough House"

Thuborough (alias Therborough, Theoburgh, etc. [1] ) in the parish of Sutcombe, Devon, England, is an historic estate, formerly a seat of a branch of the Prideaux family, also seated at Orcharton, Modbury; Adeston, Holbeton; Soldon, Holsworthy; Netherton, Farway; Ashburton; Nutwell, Woodbury; Ford Abbey, Thorncombe, all in Devon and at Prideaux Place, Padstow and Prideaux Castle, Luxulyan, in Cornwall. The present mansion house, comprising "Thuborough House" and "Thuborough Barton", the north-east block, is a grade II listed building. [2]

Contents

Descent

Brictwold

The Anglo-Saxon holder of the estate of Teweberie (in the hundred of Black Torrington) immediately prior to the Norman Conquest of 1066 was Bristvold, as recorded in the Domesday Book of 1086, [3] the standardised spelling of which name is Brictwold. A man named Brictwold, spelled variously as Bristvold, Brictvold, Bristvoldus, Bristoald, Brictwold, etc., held 11 other estates in Devon as listed in the Domesday Book, namely: [4]

de Aumale

The manor of Teweberie was held in 1086 by Robert de Aumale (fl. 1086) (Latinised to de Albemarle), one of the Devon Domesday Book tenants-in-chief of King William the Conqueror (1066-1087). His tenant was a certain Franco. Robert's lands, comprising 17 entries in the Domesday Book of 1086, later formed part of the very large Feudal barony of Plympton, [5] whose later barons were the Courtenay family, Earls of Devon. Robert was lord of Aumale in Normandy, now in the département of Seine-Maritime, France. [6] As recorded in the 12th/13th century Book of Fees, a later tenant of the estate of Thefebergh, but holding it from the feudal barony of Plympton, was a certain Ralph de Alba Mara, whose relationship to Robert de Aumale is unrecorded. Ralph also held the estate of Kismeldon in West Putford. [7]

de Esse/Ashe

Arms of de Esse or de Ashe/Aysshe: Argent, two chevrons sable Esse of Sowton Devon Arms.PNG
Arms of de Esse or de Ashe/Aysshe: Argent, two chevrons sable

The de Esse or de Ashe/Aysshe family took its surname from one of the many ancient estates in Devon named Esse/Ash. A branch of the family survived seated at the manor of Sowton (alias Clist Fomeson/Somson [8] ) until the 18th century. [9] The arms of this family were: Argent, two chevrons sable, [10] and "were quartered by several worthy families" according to the Devon historian Tristram Risdon (d.1640), [11] who recorded the following descent of the manor of Therborough: [12]

Giffard

The descent of Thuborough in the Giffard family was as follows:

Sources

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,

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References

  1. Risdon, p.248; Pole, p.498
  2. Listed building text
  3. Thorn, Caroline & Frank, (eds.) Domesday Book, (Morris, John, gen.ed.) Vol. 9, Devon, Part 1, Phillimore Press, Chichester, 1985, Chapter 28, paragraph 4
  4. Thorn & Thorn, part 2 (notes), index of names
  5. Thorn, Caroline & Frank, (eds.) Domesday Book, (Morris, John, gen.ed.) Vol. 9, Devon, Parts 1 & 2, Phillimore Press, Chichester, 1985, part 2, Chapter 28
  6. Thorne & Thorne, part 2 (notes), chapter 28
  7. Thorne & Thorne, part 2 (notes), chapter 28, para 4
  8. Pole, p.232;Risdon, p.61
  9. Vivian, 1895, pp.25-6, pedigree of Ashe or Aysshe of Sowton
  10. Pole, Sir William (d.1635), Collections Towards a Description of the County of Devon, Sir John-William de la Pole (ed.), London, 1791, p.481; Vivian, p.25
  11. Risdon, p.62
  12. Risdon, Tristram (d.1640), Survey of Devon, 1811 edition, London, 1811, with 1810 Additions, pp.248-9
  13. Vivian, Lt.Col. J.L., (Ed.) The Visitations of the County of Devon: Comprising the Heralds' Visitations of 1531, 1564 & 1620, Exeter, 1895, p.397, pedigree of Giffard
  14. Pole, p.374-5; and expanded by Vivian (1895), pp.396 et seq
  15. Risdon, p.249

Coordinates: 50°52′05″N4°20′56″W / 50.868°N 4.349°W / 50.868; -4.349