Thunnus (subgenus)

Last updated

Thunnus
Bluefin-big.jpg
T. Thynnus Atlantic bluefin tuna
Scientific classification Red Pencil Icon.png
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Actinopterygii
Order: Scombriformes
Family: Scombridae
Genus: Thunnus
Subgenus: Thunnus
South, 1845
Species

Thunnus (Thunnus) is a subgenus of ray-finned bony fishes in the Thunnini, or tuna, tribe. More specifically, Thunnus (Thunnus) is a subgenus of the genus Thunnus , also known as the "true tunas". Thunnus (Thunnus) is sometimes referred to as the bluefin group, and comprises five species:

subgenus Thunnus (Thunnus)
Thunnus (Thunnus), the Bluefin group
 tribe  Thunnini,
 tunas 
  Allothunnus , 

 A. fallai  slender tuna

  Auxis , frigate tunas 

 A. thazard frigate tuna

 A. rochei bullet tuna

  Euthynnus , little tunas 

 E. lineatus black skipjack tuna

 E. alleteratus little tunny

 E. affinus mackerel tuna or kawakawa  

  Katsuwonus  

 K. pelamis  skipjack tuna

  Thunnus , true tunas 

 T. atlanticus blackfin tuna

 T. albacares  yellowfin tuna  

 T. tonggol longtail tuna

 T. obesus bigeye tuna

 T. maccoyii southern bluefin tuna

 T. thynnus Atlantic bluefin tuna

 T. alalunga albacore

 T. orientalis  Pacific bluefin tuna  

subgenus Neothunnus
(yellowfin group)
subgenus Thunnus
(bluefin group)
Cladogram: The bluefin group of tunas, subgenus Thunnus (Thunnus), within the tribe Thunnini. [1] [2]
Thunnus (Thunnus) – the bluefin group of tunas
Common nameScientific nameMaximum
length
Common
length
Maximum
weight
Maximum
age
Trophic
level
Source IUCN status
Albacore tuna T. alalunga
(Bonnaterre, 1788)
1.4 m
(4.6 ft)
1.0 m
(3.3 ft)
60.3 kg
(133 lb)
9–13 yrs4.31 [3] [4] NT IUCN 3 1.svg Near threatened [4]
Southern bluefin tuna T. maccoyii
(Castelnau, 1872)
2.45 m
(8.0 ft)
1.6 m
(5.2 ft)
260 kg
(570 lb)
20–40 yrs3.93 [5] [6] CR IUCN 3 1.svg Critically endangered [6]
Bigeye tuna T. obesus
(Lowe, 1839)
2.5 m
(8.2 ft)
1.8 m
(5.9 ft)
210 kg
(460 lb)
5–16 yrs4.49 [7] [8] VU IUCN 3 1.svg Vulnerable [8]
Pacific bluefin tuna T. orientalis
(Temminck & Schlegel, 1844)
3.0 m
(9.8 ft)
2.0 m
(6.6 ft)
450 kg
(990 lb)
15–26 yrs4.21 [9] [10] VU IUCN 3 1.svg Vulnerable [10]
Atlantic bluefin tuna T. thynnus4.6 m
(15 ft)
2.0 m
(6.6 ft)
684 kg
(1,508 lb)
35–50 yrs4.43 [11] [12] EN IUCN 3 1.svg Endangered [12]

Related Research Articles

Tuna tribe of fishes

A tuna is a saltwater fish that belongs to the tribe Thunnini, a subgrouping of the Scombridae (mackerel) family. The Thunnini comprise 15 species across five genera, the sizes of which vary greatly, ranging from the bullet tuna up to the Atlantic bluefin tuna. The bluefin averages 2 m (6.6 ft), and is believed to live up to 50 years.

Mackerel pelagic fish

Mackerel is a common name applied to a number of different species of pelagic fish, mostly from the family Scombridae. They are found in both temperate and tropical seas, mostly living along the coast or offshore in the oceanic environment.

Albacore species of fish

The albacore, known also as the longfin tuna, is a species of tuna of the order Perciformes. It is found in temperate and tropical waters across the globe in the epipelagic and mesopelagic zones. There are six distinct stocks known globally in the Atlantic, Pacific, and Indian oceans, as well as the Mediterranean Sea. The albacore has an elongate, fusiform body with a conical snout, large eyes, and remarkably long pectoral fins. Its body is a deep blue dorsally and shades of silvery white ventrally. Individuals can reach up to 1.4 m (4.6 ft) in length.

Atlantic bluefin tuna species of tuna in the Scombridae family

The Atlantic bluefin tuna is a species of tuna in the family Scombridae. It is variously known as the northern bluefin tuna, giant bluefin tuna [for individuals exceeding 150 kg (330 lb)], and formerly as the tunny.

Yellowfin tuna species of fish

The yellowfin tuna is a species of tuna found in pelagic waters of tropical and subtropical oceans worldwide.

Billfish two families of fish, with bills

The term billfish refers to a group of predatory fish characterised by prominent bills, or rostra, and by their large size; some are longer than 4 m (13 ft). Billfish include sailfish and marlin, which make up the family Istiophoridae, and swordfish, sole member of the family Xiphiidae. They are apex predators which feed on a wide variety of smaller fish, crustaceans, and cephalopods. These two families are sometimes classified as belonging to the order Istiophoriformes, a group with origins in the Late Cretaceous around 71 million years ago with the two families diverging from one and another in the Late Miocene around 15 million years ago. However, they are also classified as being closely related to the mackerels and tuna within the suborder Scombroidei of the order Perciformes. However, the 5th edition of the Fishes of the World does recognise the Istiophoriformes as a valid order, albeit including the Sphyraenidae, the barracudas.

Bigeye tuna Species of fish

The Bigeye tuna is a species of true tuna of the genus Thunnus, belonging to the wider mackerel family Scombridae.

Frigate tuna species of fish

The frigate tuna or frigate mackerel is a species of tuna, in the family Scombridae, found around the world in tropical oceans. The eastern pacific population is now regarded as a separate species by some authorities, Auxis brachydorax.

<i>Fistularia tabacaria</i> species of fish

Fistularia tabacaria, the cornetfish, bluespotted cornetfish, tobacco trumpetfish or unarmed trumpetfish, is a species of cornetfish found along the Atlantic coasts of the Americas and in the central Atlantic off west Africa and the Macaronesian Islands. This species is of minor importance in commercial fisheries.

Blackfin tuna species of fish

The blackfin tuna is the smallest tuna species in the genus Thunnus, generally growing to a maximum of 100 cm (39 in) in length and weighing 21 kg.

<i>Thunnus</i> genus of fishes

Thunnus is a genus of ocean-dwelling, ray-finned bony fish from the mackerel family, Scombridae. More specifically, Thunnus is one of five genera which make up the tribe Thunnini – a tribe that is collectively known as the tunas. Also called the true tunas or real tunas, Thunnus consists of eight species of tuna, divided into two subgenera. The word Thunnus is the Middle Latin form of the Ancient Greek: θύννος, romanized: (thýnnos), lit. 'tunny-fish' – which is in turn derived from θύνω (thynō), "to rush; to dart". The first written use of the word was by Homer.

Pacific bluefin tuna species of fish

The Pacific bluefin tuna is a predatory species of tuna found widely in the northern Pacific Ocean, but it is migratory and also recorded as a visitor to the south Pacific.

<i>Euthynnus affinis</i> Marine fish, pelagic, Scombridae

Euthynnus affinis, the kawakawa or mackerel tuna, is a species of ray-finned bony fish in the family Scombridae, or mackerel family. It belongs to the tribe Thunnini, better known as the tunas. This is an Indo-Pacific species which is found from the Red Sea to French Polynesia.

Striped bonito species of fish

The striped bonito is a species of marine perciform fish. They have been recorded at lengths of 102 centimetres (40 in), though they are commonly no longer than 55 centimetres (22 in). Distributed through the Indo-Pacific and East Pacific, the striped bonito is known to occur at depths from 1 to 167 metres. They are called mackerel bonito.

<i>Euthynnus</i> genus of fishes

Euthynnus is a genus of ray-finned bony fish in the family Scombridae, or mackerel family, and in the tribe Thunnini, more commonly known as the tunas.

<i>Thunnus tonggol</i> species of fish

Thunnus tonggol is a species of tuna of tropical Indo-West Pacific waters.

Several fish species are known as northern bluefin tuna including:

Island mackerel species of fish

The island mackerel is a species of true mackerel in the scombrid family (Scombridae) from the Indo-Pacific. Their maximum reported length is 20 cm, and the maximum reported weight is 0.75 kg.

Neothunnus subgenus of fishes

Thunnus (Neothunnus) is a subgenus of ray-finned bony fishes in the Thunnini, or tuna, tribe. More specifically, Neothunnus is a subgenus of the genus Thunnus, also known as the "true tunas". Neothunnus is sometimes referred to as the yellowfin group, and comprises three species:

References

  1. Graham, Jeffrey B.; Dickson, Kathryn A. (2004). "Tuna Comparative Physiology" (PDF). The Journal of Experimental Biology. 207: 4015–4024. doi:10.1242/jeb.01267 . Retrieved 20 September 2012.
  2. Catanese, Gaetano; Manchado, Manuel; Infante, Carlos (15 February 2010). "Evolutionary relatedness of mackerels of the genus Scomber based on complete mitochondrial genomes: Strong support to the recognition of Atlantic Scomber colias and Pacific Scomber japonicus as distinct species". Gene. 452 (1): 35–43. doi:10.1016/j.gene.2009.12.004. PMID   20035845.
  3. Froese, Rainer and Pauly, Daniel, eds. (2012). "Thunnus alalunga" in FishBase . January 2012 version.
  4. 1 2 Collette, B.; et al. (2011). "Thunnus alalunga". IUCN Red List of Threatened Species . IUCN. 2011. Retrieved 18 October 2012.
  5. Froese, Rainer and Pauly, Daniel, eds. (2012). "Thunnus maccoyii" in FishBase . January 2012 version.
  6. 1 2 Collette, B.; et al. (2011). "Thunnus maccoyii". IUCN Red List of Threatened Species . IUCN. 2011. Retrieved 18 September 2012.
  7. Froese, Rainer and Pauly, Daniel, eds. (2012). "Thunnus obesus" in FishBase . January 2012 version.
  8. 1 2 Collette, B.; et al. (2011). "Thunnus obesus". IUCN Red List of Threatened Species . IUCN. 2011. Retrieved 18 September 2012.
  9. Froese, Rainer and Pauly, Daniel, eds. (2012). "Thunnus orientalis" in FishBase . January 2012 version.
  10. 1 2 Collette, B.; et al. (2014). "Thunnus orientalis". IUCN Red List of Threatened Species . IUCN. 2014. Retrieved 26 August 2015.
  11. Froese, Rainer and Pauly, Daniel, eds. (2012). "Thunnus thynnus" in FishBase . January 2012 version.
  12. 1 2 Collette, B.; et al. (2011). "Thunnus thynnus". IUCN Red List of Threatened Species . IUCN. 2011. Retrieved 18 September 2012.