Thurmond and Lucy Chatham House

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Thurmond and Lucy Chatham House
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Location112 N. Stratford Rd., Winston-Salem, North Carolina
Coordinates 36°5′51″N80°16′36″W / 36.09750°N 80.27667°W / 36.09750; -80.27667 Coordinates: 36°5′51″N80°16′36″W / 36.09750°N 80.27667°W / 36.09750; -80.27667
Area2.72 acres (1.10 ha)
Built1925 (1925)
Built byMcNeill Construction Company
ArchitectKeen and Wallace
Architectural styleClassical Revival
NRHP reference # 14000493 [1]
Added to NRHPAugust 18, 2014

The Thurmond and Lucy Chatham House is a historic home located at Winston-Salem, Forsyth County, North Carolina. It was built in 1925, and is a Classical Revival style stuccoed dwelling consisting of a 2 1/2-story main block flanked by two-bay-wide projecting hip-roofed sections. It has a tall hip roof and bluestone terrace that fills the rear courtyard of the "H"-shaped plan. The house encompasses 9,065-square-feet of living space. Also on the property is a contributing 1 1/2-story garage / apartment. It was built for Congressman and businessman Richard Thurmond Chatham (1896–1957), who also served as president of the Chatham Manufacturing Company and his wife, Lucy Hodgin Hanes. [2]

Winston-Salem, North Carolina City in North Carolina, United States

Winston-Salem is a city in and the county seat of Forsyth County, North Carolina, United States. With a 2018 estimated population of 246,328 it is the second largest municipality in the Piedmont Triad region, the fifth most populous city in North Carolina, the third largest urban area in North Carolina, and the eighty-ninth most populous city in the United States. With a metropolitan population of 676,673 it is the fourth largest metropolitan area in North Carolina. Winston-Salem is home to the tallest office building in the region, 100 North Main Street, formerly the Wachovia Building and now known locally as the Wells Fargo Center.

Forsyth County, North Carolina U.S. county in North Carolina, United States

Forsyth County is a county located in the U.S. state of North Carolina. As of the 2010 census, the population was 350,670, making it the fourth-most populous county in North Carolina. Its county seat is Winston-Salem.

Neoclassical architecture is an architectural style produced by the neoclassical movement that began in the mid-18th century. In its purest form, it is a style principally derived from the architecture of classical antiquity, the Vitruvian principles, and the work of the Italian architect Andrea Palladio.

It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 2014. [1]

National Register of Historic Places Federal list of historic sites in the United States

The National Register of Historic Places (NRHP) is the United States federal government's official list of districts, sites, buildings, structures and objects deemed worthy of preservation for their historical significance. A property listed in the National Register, or located within a National Register Historic District, may qualify for tax incentives derived from the total value of expenses incurred in preserving the property.

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References

  1. 1 2 "National Register of Historic Places Listings". Weekly List of Actions Taken on Properties: 8/18/14 through 8/23/14. National Park Service. 2014-08-29.
  2. Heather Fearnbach (March 2014). "Thurmond and Lucy Chatham House" (pdf). National Register of Historic Places - Nomination and Inventory. North Carolina State Historic Preservation Office. Retrieved 2014-11-01.