Thyropoeus

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Thyropoeus
Thyropoeus mirandus 1895.jpg
T. mirandus
Scientific classification Red Pencil Icon.png
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Arthropoda
Subphylum: Chelicerata
Class: Arachnida
Order: Araneae
Infraorder: Mygalomorphae
Family: Migidae
Genus: Thyropoeus
Pocock [1]
Species

Thyropoeus is a genus of spiders in the family Migidae. It was first described in 1895 by Pocock. As of 2016, it contains 2 species, both found in Madagascar. [1]

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<i>Calathotarsus</i> genus of arachnids

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Goloboffia is a genus of spiders in the family Migidae. It was first described in 2001 by Griswold & Ledford. As of 2017, it contains only one species, Goloboffia vellardi, found in Chile.

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Bertmainius monachus is a spider in the family Migidae. It was first described in 2015 by Mark Harvey, Barbara York Main, Michael Rix and Steven Cooper, and is endemic to south-western Australia.

Bertmainius mysticus is a spider in the family Migidae. It was first described in 2015 by Mark Harvey, Barbara York Main, Michael Rix and Steven Cooper, and is endemic to south-western Australia.

Bertmainius opimus is a spider in the family Migidae. It was first described in 2015 by Mark Harvey, Barbara York Main, Michael Rix and Steven Cooper, and is endemic to south-western Australia.

Bertmainius pandus is a spider in the family Migidae. It was first described in 2015 by Mark Harvey, Barbara York Main, Michael Rix and Steven Cooper, and is endemic to south-western Australia.

Bertmainius tumidus is a spider in the family Migidae. It was first described in 2015 by Mark Harvey, Barbara York Main, Michael Rix and Steven Cooper, and is endemic to south-western Australia.

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<i>Calathotarsus simoni</i> species of arachnid

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References

  1. 1 2 "Migidae". World Spider Catalog. Natural History Museum Bern. Retrieved 2016-12-28.