Tickets to the Devil

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Tickets to the Devil

TicketsToTheDevil.jpg

First edition
Author Richard P. Powell
Country United States
Language English
Genre Satire
Publisher Scribners
Publication date
1968
Media type Print
Pages 248 pp
ISBN 0-910791-41-4

Tickets to the Devil (1968) by Richard P. Powell is novel taking a glimpse into the world of duplicate bridge in the late 1960s. The story features characters loosely based on great players of those days, along with some fictional characters. All of them are competing or involved in a National bridge event set in the fictional Xanadu hotel in Miami Beach, while their stories intersect and interact in a Grand Hotel fashion. [1] [2]

Richard Pitts Powell was an American novelist.

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Duplicate bridge is the most widely used variation of contract bridge in club and tournament play. It is called duplicate because the same bridge deal is played at each table and scoring is based on relative performance. In this way, every hand, whether strong or weak, is played in competition with others playing identical cards, and the element of skill is heightened while that of chance is reduced. Duplicate bridge stands in contrast to rubber bridge where each hand is freshly dealt and where scores may be more affected by chance in the short run.

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References

  1. Sam Maltin (October 5, 1968). "Bid & Made" (Book review). The Gazette . p. 20.
  2. Bridge books reviewed - Pattaya Bridge Club