Tikaderia

Last updated

Tikaderia
Scientific classification Red Pencil Icon.png
Domain: Eukaryota
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Arthropoda
Subphylum: Chelicerata
Class: Arachnida
Order: Araneae
Infraorder: Araneomorphae
Family: Agelenidae
Genus: Tikaderia
Species:
T. psechrina
Binomial name
Tikaderia psechrina
Lehtinen, 1967 [1]

Tikaderia is a genus of funnel weavers containing the single species, Tikaderia psechrina. It was first described by Pekka T. Lehtinen in 1967, [2] and has only been found in . [1]

Related Research Articles

Uloboridae Family of spiders

Uloboridae is a family of non-venomous spiders, known as cribellate orb weavers or hackled orb weavers. Their lack of venom glands is a secondarily evolved trait. Instead, they wrap their prey thoroughly in silk, cover it in regurgitated digestive enzymes, and then ingest the liquified body.

Titanoecidae Family of spiders

Titanoecidae is a family of araneomorph spiders first described by Pekka T. Lehtinen in 1967. It is fairly widespread in the New World and Eurasia with five genera and more than 50 species worldwide. These are mostly dark-colored builders of "woolly" (cribellate) silk webs. Several species are found at relatively high altitudes in mountain ranges and may be very common in such habitats.

Velvet spider Family of spiders

Velvet spiders are a small group of spiders almost entirely limited to the Old World, with exception of a few species known from Brazil. The characteristics of this family of spiders are that they are entelegyne, eight-eyed araneomorph spiders that build unkempt webs. They are cribellate. Some species are nearly eusocial, lacking only a specialized caste system and a queen. They cooperate in brood rearing, unlike most other spiders except for some African agelenid spiders in the genus Agelena and a few others.

Amaurobiidae Family of spiders

Amaurobiidae is a family of three-clawed cribellate or ecribellate spiders found in crevices and hollows or under stones where they build retreats, and are often collected in pitfall traps. Unlidded burrows are sometimes quite obvious in crusty, loamy soil. They are difficult to distinguish from related spiders in other families, especially Agelenidae, Desidae and Amphinectidae. Their intra- and interfamilial relationships are contentious. According to the World Spider Catalog, 2019, the family Amaurobiidae includes about 275 species in 49 genera.

Dictynidae Family of spiders

Dictynidae is a family of cribellate, hackled band-producing spiders first described by Octavius Pickard-Cambridge in 1871. Most build irregular webs on or near the ground, creating a tangle of silken fibers among several branches or stems of one plant.

Phyxelididae Family of spiders

Phyxelididae is a family of araneomorph spiders first described by Pekka T. Lehtinen in 1967 as a subfamily of Amaurobiidae, and later elevated to family status as a sister group of Titanoecidae.

Mexitlia is a genus of North American cribellate araneomorph spiders in the family Dictynidae, and was first described by Pekka T. Lehtinen in 1967. As of May 2019 it contains only three species: M. altima, M. grandis, and M. trivittata.

Pekka T. Lehtinen

Pekka T. Lehtinen is a Finnish arachnologist and taxonomist. He is known for his works in systematics and for the many expeditions in which he has participated.

<i>Arctobius</i> Genus of spiders

Arctobius is a genus of tangled nest spiders containing the single species, Arctobius agelenoides. It was first described by Pekka T. Lehtinen in 1967, with a holarctic distribution.

Yacolla is a genus of South American tangled nest spiders containing the single species, Yacolla pikelinae. It was first described by Pekka T. Lehtinen in 1967, and has only been found in Brazil.

Yupanquia is a genus of South American tangled nest spiders containing the single species, Yupanquia schiapelliae. It was first described by Pekka T. Lehtinen in 1967, and has only been found in Argentina.

Marplesia is a genus of South Pacific sheetweb spiders first described by Pekka T. Lehtinen in 1967. As of April 2019 it contains only two species, both found in New Zealand.

Namandia is a monotypic genus of Australian intertidal spiders containing the single species, Namandia periscelis. It was first described by Pekka T. Lehtinen in 1967, and has only been found in Australia.

<i>Hackmania</i> Genus of spiders

Hackmania is a genus of cribellate araneomorph spiders in the family Dictynidae, and was first described by Pekka T. Lehtinen in 1967. As of May 2019 it contains only two species: H. prominula and H. saphes.

Iviella is a genus of North American cribellate araneomorph spiders in the family Dictynidae, and was first described by Pekka T. Lehtinen in 1967. As of May 2019 it contains only three species: I. newfoundlandensis, I. ohioensis, and I. reclusa.

Mashimo is a monotypic genus of East African cribellate araneomorph spiders in the family Dictynidae containing the single species, Mashimo leleupi. It was first described by Pekka T. Lehtinen in 1967, and has only been found in Zambia.

Tahuantina is a monotypic genus of South American cribellate araneomorph spiders in the family Dictynidae containing the single species, Tahuantina zapfeae. It was first described by Pekka T. Lehtinen in 1967, and has only been found in Chile.

Obatala is a genus of African tangled nest spiders containing the single species, Obatala armata. It was first described by Pekka T. Lehtinen in 1967, and has only been found in South Africa.

Intihuatana antarctica is a species of South American spider in the dwarf sheet spider family, Hahniidae. It is the only species in the monotypic genus Intihuatana. It was first described by Pekka T. Lehtinen in 1967, and has only been found in Argentina.

Megadictynidae Family of spiders

Megadictynidae is a family of araneomorph spiders first described by Pekka T. Lehtinen in 1967. They are endemic to New Zealand.

References

  1. 1 2 "Gen. Tikaderia Lehtinen, 1967". World Spider Catalog. Natural History Museum Bern. Retrieved 2019-05-08.
  2. Lehtinen, P. T. (1967). "Classification of the cribellate spiders and some allied families, with notes on the evolution of the suborder Araneomorpha". Annales Zoologici Fennici. 4: 199–468.

"Tikaderia" at the Encyclopedia of Life