Ton class

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Ton classes are categories used to identify classes of yachts.

Contents

Thames tonnage

Early attempts at creating rating rules were based on the British "old tonnage measurement" system to calculate the volume of the hold of large commercial ships. It gave the vessel's carrying capacity in tons (at 35 cubic feet per ton) or, as some believe, in tuns. Sail area was not included, of course, nor were any credits given for less efficient rigs so, naturally, in the yacht-racing field the cutters predominated. Eventually, this rule was modified in 1854 as the Thames Measurement Rule:

where the length is in feet, from the stempost to sternpost; and the beam is the maximum beam, in feet.

Godinet rule

Lerina during a sailing competition Lerina 1900.jpg
Lérina during a sailing competition
Modification to the rule in 1901 Chain and skin girth.svg
Modification to the rule in 1901

The Godinet rule was adopted in 1892 by the "Union des yachts français", and was quickly adopted by other nations from the European continental. It allowed the classifications of yachts by tons, with a formula established by Auguste Godinet which considers displacement, length, and the total sail area.

where:

The Société Nautique de Genève, which was an early adopter of the rule, amended it in 1901 to include the skin girth instead of the chain girth.

This new French rule was adopted in December 1892 by Switzerland followed by Germany, Denmark, Finland and Sweden in March 1893. Belgium and Spain completed the list. In March 1894 the Godinet rule is first noted in the United States, at the construction of the Vendenesse, the world's first aluminium yacht.

Some yacht in existence that were designed to the Godinet rule:

Olympic Games

The Ton classes where Olympic classes 1900 and probably also on that of 1896. Unfortunately due to weather conditions the yacht races in 1896 were cancelled and much information of that event is no longer available. For the 1900 events, sailing categories are established based on the Godinet rule:

1900 Olympics Flag of France.svg  France

EventGoldSilverBronze
NO Class insigna.png

1900: Open class
details

Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  Great Britain  (GBR)
Lorne Currie
John Gretton
Linton Hope
Algernon Maudslay
Flag of the German Empire.svg  Germany  (GER)
Paul Wiesner
Georg Naue
Heinrich Peters
Ottokar Weise
Flag of France.svg  France  (FRA)
Émile Michelet
NO Class insigna.png

1900: 0 to .5 ton
Race: 1
details

Flag of France.svg  France  (FRA)
Pierre Gervais
Flag of France.svg  France  (FRA)
Texier (helmsman)
Texier (crew)
Jean-Baptiste Charcot
Robert Linzeler
Flag of France.svg  France  (FRA)
Henri Monnot
Léon Tellier
Gaston Cailleux
NO Class insigna.png

1900: 0 to .5 ton
Race: 2
details

Flag of France.svg  France  (FRA)
Émile Sacré
Flag of France.svg  France  (FRA)
Texier (helmsman)
Texier (crew)
Jean-Baptiste Charcot
Robert Linzeler
Flag of France.svg  France  (FRA)
Pierre Gervais
NO Class insigna.png

1900: .5 to 1 ton
Race: 1
details

Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  Great Britain  (GBR)
Lorne Currie
John Gretton
Linton Hope
Algernon Maudslay
Flag of France.svg  France  (FRA)
Jules Valton
Félix Marcotte
William Martin
Jacques Baudrier
Jean Le Bret
Flag of France.svg  France  (FRA)
Émile Michelet
Marcel Meran
NO Class insigna.png

1900: .5 to 1 ton
Race: 2
details

Flag of France.svg  France  (FRA)
Louis Auguste-Dormeuil
Flag of France.svg  France  (FRA)
Émile Michelet
Marcel Meran
Flag of France.svg  France  (FRA)
Jules Valton
Félix Marcotte
William Martin
Jacques Baudrier
Jean Le Bret
NO Class insigna.png

1900: 1 to 2 ton
Race: 1
details

Flag of Switzerland.svg  Switzerland  (SUI)
Hermann de Pourtalès
Hélène de Pourtalès
Bernard de Pourtalès
Flag of France.svg  France  (FRA)
François Vilamitjana
Auguste Albert
Albert Duval
Charles Hugo
Flag of France.svg  France  (FRA)
Jacques Baudrier
Lucien Baudrier
Dubosq
Édouard Mantois
NO Class insigna.png

1900: 1 to 2 ton
Race: 2
details

Flag of the German Empire.svg  Germany  (GER)
Paul Wiesner
Georg Naue
Heinrich Peters
Ottokar Weise
Flag of Switzerland.svg  Switzerland  (SUI)
Hermann de Pourtalès
Hélène de Pourtalès
Bernard de Pourtalès
Flag of France.svg  France  (FRA)
François Vilamitjana
Auguste Albert
Albert Duval
Charles Hugo
NO Class insigna.png

1900: 2 to 3 ton
Race: 1
details

Olympic flag.svg  Mixed team  (ZZX)
William Exshaw
Frédéric Blanchy
Jacques Le Lavasseur
Flag of France.svg  France  (FRA)
Léon Susse
Jacques Doucet
Auguste Godinet
Henri Mialaret
Flag of France.svg  France  (FRA)
Ferdinand Schlatter
de Cottignon
Émile Jean-Fontaine
NO Class insigna.png

1900: 2 to 3 ton
Race: 2
details

Olympic flag.svg  Mixed team  (ZZX)
William Exshaw
Frédéric Blanchy
Jacques Le Lavasseur
Flag of France.svg  France  (FRA)
Léon Susse
Jacques Doucet
Auguste Godinet
Henri Mialaret
Flag of France.svg  France  (FRA)
Auguste Donny
NO Class insigna.png

1900: 3 to 10 ton
Race: 1
details

Flag of France.svg  France  (FRA)
Henri Gilardoni
Flag of the Netherlands.svg  Netherlands  (NED)
Henri Smulders
Chris Hooykaas
Arie van der Velden
Flag of France.svg  France  (FRA)
Maurice Gufflet
A. Dubois
J. Dubois
Robert Gufflet
Charles Guiraist
NO Class insigna.png

1900: 3 to 10 ton
Race: 2
details

Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  Great Britain  (GBR)
Howard Taylor
Edward Hore
Harry Jefferson
Flag of France.svg  France  (FRA)
Maurice Gufflet
A. Dubois
J. Dubois
Robert Gufflet
Charles Guiraist
US flag 45 stars.svg  United States  (USA)
H. MacHenry
NO Class insigna.png

1900: 10 to 20 ton
details

Flag of France.svg  France  (FRA)
Émile Billard
Paul Perquer
Flag of France.svg  France  (FRA)
Jean, duc Decazes
Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  Great Britain  (GBR)
Edward Hore
NO Class insigna.png

1900: 20+ ton
details

Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  Great Britain  (GBR)
Cecil Quentin
Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  Great Britain  (GBR)
Selwin Calverley
US flag 45 stars.svg  United States  (USA)
Harry Van Bergen

See also

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2.4 Metre

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12 Metre

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J-class yacht

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International rule (sailing)

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One Ton Cup

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6.5 Metre

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7 Metre

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10 Metre

The International Ten Metre Class is a construction class, meaning that the boats are not identical but are all designed to meet specific measurement formula, in this case International Rule. At their heyday, Metre Classes were the most important group of international yacht racing classes, and they are still actively raced around the world. "Ten" in class name does not, somewhat confusingly, refer to length of the boat, but product of the formula; 10mR boats are, on average, 16.5 meters long.

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15-metre class

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References