Tropical Storm Warren (1984)

Last updated

Tropical Storm Warren (Reming)
Severe tropical storm (JMA  scale)
Category 1 typhoon (SSHWS)
Warren Oct 27 1984 0841Z.png
Warren at peak intensity on October 27
FormedOctober 23, 1984 (October 23, 1984)
DissipatedNovember 2, 1984 (November 2, 1984)
(Remnant low after October 31, 1984)
Highest winds 10-minute sustained: 110 km/h (70 mph)
1-minute sustained: 120 km/h (75 mph)
Lowest pressure980 hPa (mbar); 28.94 inHg
Fatalities73 total
Damage$239,000 (1984 USD)
Areas affected Philippines
Part of the 1984 Pacific typhoon season

Tropical Storm Warren, known in the Philippines as Tropical Storm Reming, affected the Philippines during October 1984. An area of convection was first observed on October 17 in the Philippine Sea. After killing 17 while crossing the archipelago, the system developed into a tropical storm on October 23. Warren moved north and later north-northwest but late on October 24, the storm began to meander in the South China Sea. On October 26, Warren drifted west while attaining peak strength. Two days later, Warren turned back to the east-northeast and away from the Philippines. A weakened trend began on October 29 as the storm entertained cooler, drier air. Despite this, the storm's center of circulation remained well-defined until Warren moved ashore in Vietnam on November 1. Warren dissipated the next day.

Contents

Offshore the Philippines, the vessel Venus sunk due to rough seas caused by the storm. As a result of the shipwreck, 29 people were killed. a total of 174 were rescued, including 96 people that were rescued via a fishing boat. Nearby, another cargo container ship, the Lorcon 8, sank but all 19 crewmen were rescued. Across the island chain, 73 people died, 25 due to landslides, while 18 others were injured. Greater than 10,000 people were directly affected by the typhoon. Moreover, 740 houses were destroyed, with an additional 891 damaged. Damage was estimated at $239,000 (1984 USD), with $59,000 from crops and $180,000 from infrastructure.

Meteorological history

Map plotting the track and intensity of the storm, according to the Saffir-Simpson scale Warren 1984 track.png
Map plotting the track and intensity of the storm, according to the Saffir–Simpson scale

The precursor of Tropical Storm Warren was first noted on October 17 as a poorly organized area of convection over 550 km (340 mi) northeast of Mindanao Island. Initially, synoptic data suggested that the storm's circulation was broad, ill-defined, and positioned over the monsoon trough. The disturbance began to encounter lower wind shear, prompting a small increase in organization. At 15:00 UTC on October 18, a Tropical Cyclone Formation Alert (TCFA) was issued. The alert was cancelled less than 24 hours later, however, in response to a decrease in the storm's convection, as well as, strong wind shear and its close proximity to land. Over the next few days, the system moved over the Philippines, disrupting its surface circulation. Moving west-southwest, the disturbance entered the South China Sea on October 22. Despite initially remaining poorly organized, conditions aloft became much more conducive for development that evening, and aided by the monsoonal flow, the system developed a well-defined surface circulation. [1] At 00:00 UTC on October 23, both the Joint Typhoon Warning Center (JTWC) and the Japan Meteorological Agency (JMA) started tracking the system. [2] [nb 1] [4] The aforementioned circulation was at first exposed from the deep convection, but by 03:00 UTC on October 23, the storm had rapidly become better organized. Following a further increase in the system's organization, a second TCFA was issued at 11:30 UTC. Based on a Dvorak estimate of T2.5, the JTWC upgrade the system into a tropical depression at 18:00 UTC, [1] although post-season analysis from the agency suggests that the cyclone was a tropical storm by this time. Early on October 24, the JMA followed suit and upgraded Warren into a tropical storm. [5] [nb 2] Also around this time, the Philippine Atmospheric, Geophysical and Astronomical Services Administration (PAGASA) started tracking the storm and assigned it with the local name Reming. [7]

Initially, Tropical Storm Warren drifted north [1] and then north-northwest. [8] Later on October 24, the center once again became partially exposed from the deep convection. Thereafter, Warren began to move erratically. [1] Early on October 25, the JMA classified Warren as a severe tropical storm. [2] After performing a small cyclonic loop, Warren, still embedded in the monsoon trough, began to drift westward, while a mid-latitude cyclone was located to the cyclone's north. [1] Later that day, Warren existed PAGASA's area of responsibility. [9] At 06:00 UTC on October 26, the JTWC designated Warren a typhoon while increasing the intensity of Warren to 120 km/h (75 mph), its maximum intensity. Meanwhile, the JMA estimates that Warren peaked in intensity, with winds of 115 km/h (70 mph) and a minimum barometric pressure of 980 mbar (29 inHg), an intensity it would remain at for several days. [5] Starting midday on October 26, Warren stalled out for the next 12 hours, only to drift east-northeast in response to the inflow to Typhoon Vanessa and a trough to its north. On October 28, after re-entering PASAGA's warning responsibility, [9] Warren slowed and made a cyclonic turn back to the east-northeast as the trough moved to the east of Warren and a subtropical ridge became center to the north of the cyclone. [1]

By October 29, Warren began to expand in size in response to a monsoonal surge of moisture into the South China Sea. This also caused the storm to inherit cooler, drier air, which prompted weakening [1] while also recurving towards the northeast. [8] At 00:00 UTC on October 29, the JTWC downgraded Warren into a tropical storm, [4] though the JMA would not follow suit until 36 hours later. [2] On August 30, the storm exited PASAGA's warning zone. [9] Thunderstorm activity continued to decrease, and by October 31, the low-level center had become displaced to the convection and the upper-level center. At 06:00 UTC that day, the JTWC issued the final warning on the cyclone while it was still producing winds of 55 km/h (35 mph). Despite this, the storm's center remained well-defined for an additional 24 hours. The remnants of the storm later crossed the coast of Vietnam, with winds of 55 to 65 km/h (35 to 40 mph). Late on November 1, the circulation had become less defined and increasingly difficult to locate, and the JTWC estimated that Warren dissipated the next day. [1] During the afternoon of November 2, the JMA ceased tracking Warren. [2]

Impact

The precursor disturbance to Warren drenched the nations in heavy rains that led to the deaths of 17. [10] As a result of Warren's turn to the west on October 28, the storm posed a serious threat to the Philippines. All U.S. Navy and Air Force bases in the region were placed in "Condition of Readiness I" early that day. Although no major damage ultimately occurred on the naval bases, winds of 45 km/h (27 mph) and 222 mm (8.74 in) of rain were recorded at Clark Air Base. [1] In the province of Bataan, 30 houses were destroyed, which led to 200 people without a home. [11] A family of 13 died after their house was buried in a landslide in Aurora. [12] Elsewhere, twelve other people died due landslides. [13]

Offshore Marinduque Island, strong waves generated by the storm sunk a 745 t (745,000 kg) vessel, Venus, [11] within three minutes. [14] Officially, the ship consisted of 83 passengers and 42 crewmen when it left Laoang for Samar Island, even though the captain claimed that there were as many as 240 aboard. [15] Later reports indicates that vessel had 200 passengers and 42 crewman on board. [16] A total of 174 were rescued, [13] including 96 people that were rescued via a fishing boat [11] and many others that was rescued by fishermen. [16] Twenty-nine people, [17] including two children, drowned due to the incident. [11] Nearby, a cargo container ship, the Lorcon 8, sank, but all 19 crewmen were rescued. [10] Nationwide, 73 people perished, [17] with 18 others hurt. A total of 10,815 people or 1,914 families were directly affected by the typhoon. [18] Furthermore, 740 houses were destroyed, with an additional 891 damaged. Damage was estimated at $239,000, with $59,000 from crops and $180,000 from both public and private infrastructure. [9] [nb 3]

See also

Notes

  1. The Japan Meteorological Agency is the official Regional Specialized Meteorological Center for the western Pacific Ocean. [3]
  2. Wind estimates from the JMA and most other basins throughout the world are sustained over 10 minutes, while estimates from the United States-based Joint Typhoon Warning Center are sustained over 1 minute. 10‑minute winds are about 1.14 times the amount of 1‑minute winds. [6]
  3. All Philippine currencies are converted to United States Dollars using Philippines Measuring worth with an exchange rate of the year 1984.

Related Research Articles

2003 Pacific typhoon season Period of formation of tropical cyclones in the Western Pacific Ocean in 2003

The 2003 Pacific typhoon season was a slightly below average yearlong period of tropical cyclogenesis exhibiting the development of 45 tropical depressions, of which 21 became named storms; of those, 14 became typhoons. Though every month with the exception of February and March featured tropical activity, most storms developed from May through October. During the season, tropical cyclones affected the Philippines, Japan, China, the Korean Peninsula, Indochina, and various islands in the western Pacific.

2002 Pacific typhoon season Tropical cyclone season in the Western Pacific Ocean

The 2002 Pacific typhoon season was a slightly above average Pacific typhoon season, producing twenty-six named storms, fifteen becoming typhoons, and eight super typhoons. It was an event in the annual cycle of tropical cyclone formation, in which tropical cyclones form in the western Pacific Ocean. The season ran throughout 2002, though most tropical cyclones typically develop between May and October. The season's first named storm, Tapah, developed on January 11, while the season's last named storm, Pongsona, dissipated on December 11. The season's first typhoon, Mitag, reached typhoon status on March 1, and became the first super typhoon of the year four days later.

1988 Pacific typhoon season

The 1988 Pacific typhoon season had no official bounds; it ran year-round in 1988, but most tropical cyclones tend to form in the northwestern Pacific Ocean between May and November. These dates conventionally delimit the period of each year when most tropical cyclones form in the northwestern Pacific Ocean. Tropical Storms formed in the entire west Pacific basin were assigned a name by the Joint Typhoon Warning Center. Tropical depressions that enter or form in the Philippine area of responsibility are assigned a name by the Philippine Atmospheric, Geophysical and Astronomical Services Administration or PAGASA. This can often result in the same storm having two names.

1987 Pacific typhoon season

The 1987 Pacific typhoon season has no official bounds; it ran year-round in 1987, but most tropical cyclones tend to form in the northwestern Pacific Ocean between May and November. These dates conventionally delimit the period of each year when most tropical cyclones form in the northwestern Pacific Ocean. Tropical storms formed in the entire west pacific basin were assigned a name by the Joint Typhoon Warning Center. Tropical depressions that enter or form in the Philippine area of responsibility are assigned a name by the Philippine Atmospheric, Geophysical and Astronomical Services Administration or PAGASA. This can often result in the same storm having two names.

2009 Pacific typhoon season

The 2009 Pacific typhoon season was a below average season that spawned only 22 named storms, 13 typhoons, and five super typhoons. It was also recognized as the deadliest season in the Philippines for decades. The first half of the season was very quiet whereas the second half of the season was extremely active. The season's first named storm, Kujira, developed on May 3 while the season's last named storm, Nida, dissipated on December 3.

2011 Pacific typhoon season Review of the weather events

The 2011 Pacific typhoon season was a below average season that produced a total of 21 named storms, 8 typhoons, and four super typhoons. This season was much more active than the previous season, although both seasons were below the Pacific typhoon average of 26. The season ran throughout 2011, though most tropical cyclone tend to develop between May and October. The season's first named storm, Aere, developed on May 7 while the season's last named storm, Washi dissipated on December 19.

Typhoon Alex (1987) Category 1 Pacific typhoon in 1987

Typhoon Alex, known in the Philippines as Typhoon Etang, affected the Taiwan, China, and South Korea during July 1987. Typhoon Alex developed from the monsoon trough that spawned a tropical disturbance late on July 21 southwest of Guam which organized into a tropical depression shortly thereafter. The system steadily became better organized, and the next day, a tropical depression had developed. Satellite intensity estimates gradually increased, and on July 23, the depression intensified into Tropical Storm Alex. After initially tracking west-northwest, Tropical Storm Alex started tracking northwest. An eye developed on July 24, and on the next day, Alex was classified as a typhoon, when Alex attained its peak intensity of 120 km/h (75 mph) and a minimum barometric pressure of 970 mbar (29 inHg). Alex weakened while tracking more northward, though interaction with Taiwan resulted in a more westward track starting on July 27. The storm struck near Shanghai as a tropical storm, and weakened over land, although it remained identifiable through August 2.

Typhoon Faye (1982) Category 2 Pacific typhoon in 1982

Typhoon Faye also known in the Philippines as Typhoon Norming was a long-lived typhoon that struck the Philippines in August 1982. On August 16, a weak tropical disturbance was moving towards the southern Philippines. Initially, land interaction with the Philippines with prevented significant development. After crossing the Philippines, the disturbance emerged into the South China Sea and increased in organization. It was upgraded into a tropical storm by midday on August 22. Thereafter, Faye began to steadily strengthen, and attained typhoon intensity later that day. On August 23, Typhoon Faye reached its peak intensity, which the storm would maintain for approximately 12 hours. A small cyclone, Faye moved northward on August 24 due to the weakening of a ridge over China. Thereafter, its center was disrupted by land interaction with the Philippines. As such, the storm weakened slightly before striking Luzon on the morning of August 25. Severe flooding and strong winds were recorded. More than 5,000 houses were damaged while 220,000 were homeless. Furthermore, around 7,000 people sought shelter. There were 18 injuries and 41 deaths in the Philippines. Overall, damage amounted to $9.6 million (1982 USD). Across Japan, two people perished.

Typhoon Kim (1980) Category 4 Pacific super typhoon in 1980

Typhoon Kim, known in the Philippines as Typhoon Osang, was the second typhoon in a week to directly affect the Philippines during July 1980. Like Typhoon Joe, Kim formed from the near equatorial monsoon trough in the northwestern Pacific Ocean on July 19. The disturbance tracked quickly westward-northwest underneath a subtropical ridge, reaching tropical storm strength on the July 21 and typhoon strength on July 23. After developing an eye, Kim began to rapidly intensify, and during the afternoon of July 24, peaked in intensity as a super typhoon. Several hours later, Kim made landfall over the Philippines, but the storm had weakened considerably by this time. Throughout the Philippines, 40 people were killed, 2 via drownings, and 19,000 others were directly affected. A total of 12,000 homes were destroyed and 5,000 villages were flooded. Less than a week earlier, the same areas were affected by Joe; however, Kim was considered the more damaging of the two typhoons. Land interaction took its toll on Kim, and upon entering the South China Sea, the storm was down below typhoon intensity. Kim continued northwestward but its disrupted circulation prevented re-intensification, and it remained a tropical storm until hitting southern China July 27 to the northeast of Hong Kong, where only slight damage was reported. Later that day, Kim dissipated.

Typhoon Lingling (2001) Pacific typhoon

Typhoon Lingling, known in the Philippines as Typhoon Nanang, was a deadly typhoon that struck the Philippines and China in 2001 and caused 379 deaths. The name "Lingling" was given by Hong Kong. The 39th tropical depression, 22nd named storm, and 13th typhoon of the 2001 Pacific typhoon season, Lingling developed into a tropical depression on November 6 and given the local name Nanang by the PAGASA. The next day, it was upgraded into a tropical storm and given the name Lingling by the Japan Meteorological Agency (JMA). Lingling's intensity briefly stagnated as it moved over Visayas before resuming intensification and intensifying into a severe tropical storm on November 8. One day later, both the JMA and the Joint Typhoon Warning Center (JTWC) upgraded Lingling to a typhoon as it exited the Philippine archipelago and moved into the South China Sea. After intensifying into a typhoon, Lingling began to quickly intensify, peaking with 10-min sustained winds of 155 km/h (100 mph) and 1-min sustained winds of 215 km/h (130 mph), with a minimum central pressure of 940 mbar (27.76 inHg). Lingling began to weaken as it approached the Vietnamese coast, before making landfall on November 11 at 18:00 UTC. Lingling rapidly weakened afterward, dissipating on November 12.

Typhoon Yancy (1990) Pacific typhoon in 1990

Typhoon Yancy, known as Typhoon Gading in the Philippines, was the second-deadliest typhoon of the 1990 Pacific typhoon season, after Typhoon Mike.

Typhoon Vongfong (2014) Pacific typhoon in 2014

Typhoon Vongfong, known in the Philippines as Typhoon Ompong, was the most intense tropical cyclone worldwide in 2014, and struck Japan as a large tropical system. It also indirectly affected the Philippines and Taiwan. Vongfong was the nineteenth named storm and the ninth typhoon of the 2014 Pacific typhoon season. Estimates assess damage from Vongfong to have been over US$160 million, mainly for striking mainland Japan. At least 9 people were killed along the path of the typhoon in those countries.

Typhoon Gerald Category 3 Pacific typhoon in 1987

Typhoon Gerald, known in the Philippines as Typhoon Neneng, affected the Philippines, Taiwan, and China during September 1987. A tropical depression developed on September 4, and within 24 hours, intensified into a tropical storm. After initially moving erratically within the Philippine Sea, Gerald moved west-northwest and then northwest while steadily deepening. Gerald obtained typhoon intensity on September 8, and the following day, attained maximum intensity. Shortly thereafter, the typhoon skirted southwestern Taiwan, which resulted in a steady weakening trend. On September 10, Gerald moved ashore north of Hong Kong near Amoy. Gerald dissipated the next day.

Typhoon Joe (1980) Category 3 Pacific typhoon in 1980

Typhoon Joe, known in the Philippines as Typhoon Nitang, affected the Philippines, China, and Vietnam during July 1980. An area of disturbed weather formed near the Caroline Islands on July 14. Shower activity gradually became better organized, and two days later, the system was upgraded into a tropical depression. On July 18, the depression was classified as Tropical Storm Joe. Initially, Joe moved northwest, but began to turn to the west-northwest, anchored by a subtropical ridge to its north. Joe started to deepen at a faster clip, and attained typhoon intensity on July 19. The eye began to clear out, and the next day, Joe reached its highest intensity. Shortly thereafter, Joe moved ashore the Philippines. There, 31 people were killed and 300,000 others were directly affected. Around 5,000 homes were destroyed, resulting in an additional 29,000 homeless. Damage in the nation was estimated at $14.5 million (1980 USD).

2021 Pacific typhoon season Period of formation of tropical cyclones in the Western Pacific Ocean in 2021

The 2021 Pacific typhoon season is an ongoing event in the annual cycle of tropical cyclone formation, in which tropical cyclones form in the western Pacific Ocean. The season runs throughout 2021, with no seasonal boundaries, though most tropical cyclones typically develop between May and October. The season's first named storm, Dujuan, developed on February 16. The season's first typhoon, Surigae, reached typhoon status on April 16. It became the first super typhoon of the year on the next day, also becoming the strongest tropical cyclone in 2021 so far. Surigae was also the most powerful tropical cyclone on record in the Northern Hemisphere for the month of April.

Typhoon Irving (1982) Category 2 Pacific typhoon in 1982

Typhoon Irving, known in the Philippines as Typhoon Ruping, was a mid-season tropical cyclone that affected the Philippines and China during September 1982. An area of disturbed weather developed within the monsoon trough during early September 1982 near Guam. Following an increase in organization, a tropical depression developed on the morning of September 5. Later that day, the depression intensified into Tropical Storm Irving. Irving tracked westward, nearly becoming a typhoon before hitting the central Philippines. There, Irving uprooted trees, downed power and telephone lines, triggered landslides, and forced the cancellation of several domestic airline flights. Irving damaged 7,890 houses in Albay and Sorsogon provinces alone, resulting in 138,500 people homeless. Nation-wide, 65 people were killed, 26 others were hurt, and 29 were rendered missing. A total of 44,383 families or 248,040 residents sought shelter. Moreover, 18,488 homes were damaged and 5,599 others were demolished. Damage in the country was assessed at US$23.3 million, including US$14.2 million in crops. While crossing the island chain, Irving turned northwestward. After entering the South China Sea, Irving continued generally northwest, and became a typhoon on September 11. After developing a well-defined eye, Irving attained its peak intensity of 160 km/h (100 mph) the following day. Land interaction with Hainan Island resulted in a weakening trend, and Irving was downgraded to a tropical storm before striking the southern coast of China on September 15. Across the Leizhou Peninsula, 90% of homes were damaged. Onshore, Irving rapidly weakened and the storm dissipated on September 16.

Typhoon Holly (1984) Pacific typhoon in 1984

Typhoon Holly, known in the Philippines as Typhoon Isang, affected South Korea, Japan, and the Soviet Union during August 1984. Holly originated from the monsoon trough that extended eastward from its original position in mid-August 1984. Over a period of several days, the system slowly became better organized as it tracked westward, although the system did not initially develop a well-defined center. On August 15, a tropical depression was declared, and on the next day, the depression was upgraded into Tropical Storm Holly. Holly slowly gained strength, becoming a typhoon on August 17 as it passed near Okinawa. The typhoon turned northwest and then north as it rounded a subtropical ridge. At noon on August 19, Holly attained its peak intensity of 130 km/h (80 mph). Shortly after its peak, Holly accelerated northeast due to the westerlies in the general direction of the Korean Peninsula. Land interaction with South Korea triggered a weakening trend, and after entering the Sea of Japan, Holly began to transition into an extratropical cyclone. Thunderstorm activity quickly decreased near the center, and by August 21, Holly had completed its extratropical transition.

Tropical Storm Usagi (2018) Western Pacific severe tropical storm in 2018

Severe Tropical Storm Usagi, known in the Philippines as Tropical Storm Samuel, was a tropical cyclone that made landfall on Southern Vietnam in late November 2018, causing severe damage around Ho Chi Minh City. The storm formed from a disturbance in the Central Pacific basin on November 3, but did not develop into a tropical storm until almost three weeks later, on November 13. While never considered as a typhoon by the Japan Meteorological Agency (JMA), Usagi underwent rapid intensification and peaked as a Category 2 typhoon on the Saffir–Simpson scale before making its final landfall on Vũng Tàu, Bà Rịa-Vũng Tàu Province as a weakening tropical storm on November 25. Usagi caused one death and ₱52.2 million (US$992,000) in damages in the Philippines, most of which came from agriculture. Usagi caused 3 deaths and ₫925 billion in damages in Vietnam.

Tropical Storm Barijat

Tropical Storm Barijat, known in the Philippines as Tropical Storm Neneng, was a weak tropical storm that caused flooding in the far northern regions of the Philippines and Southern China. The thirty-third tropical depression and twenty-third tropical storm of the 2018 Pacific typhoon season, it was first noted as an area of convection in the South China Sea on September 6. On September 8, it was upgraded to a tropical depression, and by September 11, it intensified into a tropical storm, with the Japan Meteorological Agency (JMA) giving it the name Barijat. Barijat peaked in intensity 6 hours later, with 10-min winds of 40 knots and 1-min winds of 45 knots. Barijat continued westward, and on November 12 at 00:30 UTC, it made landfall over Zhanjiang, quickly dissipating afterwards.

Tropical Storm Maliksi (2018) West Pacific Tropical storm in 2018

Severe Tropical Storm Maliksi, known in the Philippines as Severe Tropical Storm Domeng, was a tropical cyclone in June 2018 that brought rainfall to the Philippines and Japan. It caused 2 deaths and prompted the PAGASA to declare the beginning of the rainy season in the Philippines. The fifth named storm and 4th tropical cyclone in the Philippine Area of Responsibility (PAR), it was first noted as an area of convection on May 31.

References

  1. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 Joint Typhoon Warning Center; Naval Pacific Meteorology and Oceanography Center (1987). Annual Tropical Cyclone Report: 1984 (PDF) (Report). United States Navy, United States Air Force. pp. 107–110. Retrieved May 25, 2017.
  2. 1 2 3 4 Japan Meteorological Agency (October 10, 1992). RSMC Best Track Data – 1980–1989 (Report). Archived from the original (.TXT) on December 5, 2014. Retrieved May 25, 2017.
  3. "Annual Report on Activities of the RSMC Tokyo – Typhoon Center 2000" (PDF). Japan Meteorological Agency. February 2001. p. 3. Retrieved May 25, 2017.
  4. 1 2 Typhoon 26W Best Track (TXT) (Report). Joint Typhoon Warning Center. December 17, 2002. Retrieved May 25, 2017.
  5. 1 2 Kenneth R. Knapp; Michael C. Kruk; David H. Levinson; Howard J. Diamond; Charles J. Neumann (2010). 1984 Warren (1984291N13130). The International Best Track Archive for Climate Stewardship (IBTrACS): Unifying tropical cyclone best track data (Report). Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society. Retrieved May 25, 2017.
  6. Christopher W Landsea; Hurricane Research Division (April 26, 2004). "Subject: D4) What does "maximum sustained wind" mean? How does it relate to gusts in tropical cyclones?". Frequently Asked Questions:. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory. Retrieved May 25, 2017.
  7. Padua, Michael V. (November 6, 2008). PAGASA Tropical Cyclone Names 1963–1988 (TXT) (Report). Typhoon 2000. Retrieved May 25, 2017.
  8. 1 2 Hong Kong Observatory (1985). "Part III – Tropical Cyclone Summaries". Meteorological Results: 1984 (PDF). Meteorological Results (Report). Hong Kong Observatory. pp. 26–29. Retrieved May 25, 2017.
  9. 1 2 3 4 Destructive Typhoons 1970–2003 (Report). National Disaster Coordinating Council. November 9, 2004. Archived from the original on November 26, 2004. Retrieved May 28, 2017.
  10. 1 2 "International News". Associated Press. October 29, 1984.
  11. 1 2 3 4 "International News". United Press International. October 29, 1984.
  12. "International News". Associated Press. October 30, 1984.
  13. 1 2 "Storm kills at least 56". United Press International. October 30, 1984.
  14. De Castro, Eric (October 30, 1984). "Death toll from Warren rises to 56". United Press International.
  15. "International News (2)". United Press International. October 29, 1984.
  16. 1 2 "Rescuers Retrieve 12 More Bodies". Associated Press. October 30, 1984.
  17. 1 2 "Rescuers Recover 11 More Bodies, Death Toll At 29". Associated Press. November 2, 1984.
  18. Destructive Typhoons 1970–2003 (Report). National Disaster Coordinating Council. November 9, 2004. Archived from the original on November 9, 2004. Retrieved May 28, 2017.