USS Monaghan (DD-32)

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USS Monaghan (DD-32) at anchor.jpg
USS Monaghan (DD-32) at anchor, circa 1912.
History
US flag 48 stars.svgUnited States
Name:Monaghan
Namesake: Ensign John R. Monaghan
Builder: Newport News Shipbuilding Company, Newport News, Virginia
Cost: $644,102.64 [1]
Laid down: 1 June 1910
Launched: 18 February 1911
Sponsored by: Mrs. Frank J. Gavin, sister of the late Ens. Monaghan
Commissioned: 21 June 1911
Decommissioned: 4 November 1919
Struck: 5 July 1934
Identification:
Fate: transferred to the United States Coast Guard, 7 June 1924
Status: sold and broken up for scrap in 1934
Notes:Monaghan lost her name to new construction on 1 July 1933
USS Monaghan (DD-32).JPG
Monaghan on Coast Guard service during the Prohibition Era
Ensign of the United States Coast Guard.svgUnited States
Name:Monaghan
Acquired: 7 June 1924 [2]
Commissioned: 30 June 1925 [2]
Decommissioned: 29 January 1931 [2]
Identification: Hull symbol:CG-15
Fate: returned to the US Navy
General characteristics [3]
Class and type: Paulding-class destroyer
Displacement:
  • 742 long tons (754 t) normal
  • 887 long tons (901 t) full load
Length: 293 ft 10 in (89.56 m)
Beam: 27 ft (8.2 m)
Draft: 8 ft 4 in (2.54 m) (mean) [4]
Installed power: 12,000 ihp (8,900 kW)
Propulsion:
Speed:
  • 29.5 kn (33.9 mph; 54.6 km/h)
  • 30.45 kn (35.04 mph; 56.39 km/h) (Speed on Trial) [4]
Complement: 4 officers 87 enlisted [5]
Armament:

The first USS Monaghan (DD-32) was a modified Paulding-class destroyer in the United States Navy during World War I and later in the United States Coast Guard, designated (CG-15). She was named for Ensign John R. Monaghan.

<i>Paulding</i>-class destroyer ship class

The Paulding-class destroyers were a series of United States Navy destroyers derived from the Smith class with the torpedo tubes increased from three to six via twin mounts. They were the first destroyers in the US Navy with oil-fired boilers. The 21 Pauldings doubled the number of destroyers in the US Navy. The Paulding class derived its name from the class's lead ship, Paulding, named for Rear Admiral Hiram Paulding (1797–1878). Like the Smiths, they were nicknamed "flivvers" after the small and shaky Model T Ford once the larger "thousand tonner" destroyers entered service.

Destroyer Type of warship

In naval terminology, a destroyer is a fast, maneuverable long-endurance warship intended to escort larger vessels in a fleet, convoy or battle group and defend them against smaller powerful short-range attackers. They were originally developed in the late 19th century by Fernando Villaamil for the Spanish Navy as a defense against torpedo boats, and by the time of the Russo-Japanese War in 1904, these "torpedo boat destroyers" (TBDs) were "large, swift, and powerfully armed torpedo boats designed to destroy other torpedo boats". Although the term "destroyer" had been used interchangeably with "TBD" and "torpedo boat destroyer" by navies since 1892, the term "torpedo boat destroyer" had been generally shortened to simply "destroyer" by nearly all navies by the First World War.

United States Navy Naval warfare branch of the United States Armed Forces

The United States Navy (USN) is the naval warfare service branch of the United States Armed Forces and one of the seven uniformed services of the United States. It is the largest and most capable navy in the world and it has been estimated that in terms of tonnage of its active battle fleet alone, it is larger than the next 13 navies combined, which includes 11 U.S. allies or partner nations. with the highest combined battle fleet tonnage and the world's largest aircraft carrier fleet, with eleven in service, and two new carriers under construction. With 319,421 personnel on active duty and 99,616 in the Ready Reserve, the Navy is the third largest of the service branches. It has 282 deployable combat vessels and more than 3,700 operational aircraft as of March 2018, making it the second-largest air force in the world, after the United States Air Force.

Contents

Monaghan was laid down on 1 June 1910 by Newport News Shipbuilding Company, Newport News, Virginia; launched on 18 February 1911; sponsored by Mrs. F. J. Gavin, sister of Ensign Monaghan; and commissioned on 21 June 1911, Lieutenant Commander W. P. Cronan in command.

Newport News, Virginia Independent city in Virginia, United States

Newport News is an independent city in the U.S. state of Virginia. As of the 2010 census, the population was 180,719. In 2013, the population was estimated to be 183,412, making it the fifth-most populous city in Virginia.

World War I

Joining the Atlantic Fleet, Monaghan took part in fleet readiness training and operations which prepared the US Navy to enter action immediately when its country joined the Allies in World War I. Monaghan's first war service was on patrol along the Atlantic coast; she then escorted troop convoys through the dangerous mid-ocean section of their crossings. From November 1917 until the Armistice a year later, Monaghan made antisubmarine patrols against the U-boat menace in European waters. Returning from occupation duty, Monaghan decommissioned at Philadelphia on 4 November 1919.

United States Fleet Forces Command

The United States Fleet Forces Command (USFF) is a service component command of the United States Navy that provides naval forces to a wide variety of U.S. forces. The naval resources may be allocated to Combatant Commanders such as United States Northern Command (USNORTHCOM) under the authority of the Secretary of Defense. Originally formed as United States Atlantic Fleet (USLANTFLT) in 1906, it has been an integral part of the defense of the United States of America since the early 20th century. In 2002, the Fleet comprised over 118,000 Navy and Marine Corps personnel serving on 186 ships and in 1,300 aircraft, with an area of responsibility ranging over most of the Atlantic Ocean from the North Pole to the South Pole, the Caribbean Sea, Gulf of Mexico, and the waters of the Pacific Ocean along the coasts of Central and South America. The command is based at Naval Support Activity Hampton Roads in Norfolk, Virginia and is the navy's service component to U.S. Northern Command and is a supporting command under the U.S. Strategic Command.

U-boat German submarine of the First or Second World War

U-boat is an anglicised version of the German word U-Boot[ˈuːboːt](listen), a shortening of Unterseeboot, literally "underseaboat." While the German term refers to any submarine, the English one refers specifically to military submarines operated by Germany, particularly in the First and Second World Wars. Although at times they were efficient fleet weapons against enemy naval warships, they were most effectively used in an economic warfare role and enforcing a naval blockade against enemy shipping. The primary targets of the U-boat campaigns in both wars were the merchant convoys bringing supplies from Canada and other parts of the British Empire, and from the United States to the United Kingdom and to the Soviet Union and the Allied territories in the Mediterranean. German submarines also destroyed Brazilian merchant ships during World War II, causing Brazil to declare war on the Axis powers in 1944.

Inter-war period

Monaghan was transferred to the Coast Guard on 7 June 1924 to serve in the Rum Patrol. She was stationed at New London, Connecticut until she was sent to Boston, Massachusetts in 1930.

Rum Patrol

The Rum Patrol was an operation of the United States Coast Guard to interdict liquor smuggling vessels, known as "rum runners" in order to enforce prohibition in American waters. On 18 December 1917, the 18th Amendment to the Constitution was submitted to the states by Congress. On 16 January 1919, the amendment was ratified and the Liquor Prohibition Amendment, which prohibited the manufacture, sale, transportation, importation, or exportation of intoxicating liquors, came into effect on 16 January 1920.

New London, Connecticut City in New London, Connecticut

New London is a seaport city and a port of entry on the northeast coast of the United States, located at the mouth of the Thames River in New London County, Connecticut. It was one of the world's three busiest whaling ports for several decades beginning in the early 19th century, along with Nantucket and New Bedford, Massachusetts. The wealth that whaling brought into the city furnished the capital to fund much of the city's present architecture. The city subsequently became home to other shipping and manufacturing industries, but it has gradually lost most of its industrial heart.

She was returned to the Navy on 8 May 1931. Her name was dropped on 1 July 1933 so that it might be assigned to a new destroyer, and she was sold to Michael Flynn of Brooklyn, New York on 22 August 1934 for scrapping in accordance with the London Naval Treaty.

USS <i>Monaghan</i> (DD-354) Destroyer

USS Monaghan (DD-354) was the last ship built of the Farragut-class destroyer design. She was named for Ensign John R. Monaghan. Monaghan was laid down on November 21, 1933 at the Boston Navy Yard, and launched on January 9, 1935. She was sponsored by Miss Mary F. Monaghan, niece of Ensign Monaghan, and commissioned on 19 April 1935, with Commander R. R. Thompson in command. During the next few years Monaghan operated primarily in the North Atlantic, training US Navy personnel who served in World War II. Monaghan was present during the Pearl Harbor raid on December 7, 1941. She participated in the Battle of the Coral Sea and the Battle of Midway in 1942. Monaghan was sunk in a typhoon east of the Philippines in 1944.

Brooklyn Borough in New York City and county in New York state, United States

Brooklyn is the most populous borough of New York City, with an estimated 2,648,771 residents in 2017. Named after the Dutch village of Breukelen, it borders the borough of Queens at the western end of Long Island. Brooklyn has several bridge and tunnel connections to the borough of Manhattan across the East River, and the Verrazzano-Narrows Bridge connects Staten Island. Since 1896, Brooklyn has been coterminous with Kings County, the most populous county in the U.S. state of New York and the second-most densely populated county in the United States, after New York County.

London Naval Treaty agreement between the United Kingdom, Japan, France, Italy and the United States, signed on 22 April 1930, which regulated submarine warfare and limited naval shipbuilding

The Treaty for the Limitation and Reduction of Naval Armament, commonly known as the London Naval Treaty, was an agreement between the United Kingdom, Japan, France, Italy and the United States, signed on 22 April 1930, which regulated submarine warfare and limited naval shipbuilding. Ratifications were exchanged in London on 27 October 1930, and the treaty went into effect on the same day. It was registered in League of Nations Treaty Series on 6 February 1931.

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USS <i>Walke</i> (DD-34)

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USS <i>Ammen</i> (DD-35)

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USS <i>Patterson</i> (DD-36)

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USS <i>Fanning</i> (DD-37)

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USS <i>Henley</i> (DD-39)

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References

  1. "Table 21 – Ships on Navy List June 30, 1919". Congressional Serial Set. U.S. Government Printing Office: 762. 1921.
  2. 1 2 3 Record of Movements Vessels of the United States Coast Guard 1790 -December 31, 1933 (PDF). Washington: TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 1989. p. 446.
  3. "USS Monaghan (DD-32)". Navsource.org. Retrieved 18 June 2015.
  4. 1 2 "Table 10 – Ships on Navy List June 30, 1919". Congressional Serial Set. U.S. Government Printing Office: 714. 1921.
  5. "Table 16 – Ships on Navy List June 30, 1919". Congressional Serial Set. U.S. Government Printing Office: 749. 1921.

This article incorporates text from the public domain Dictionary of American Naval Fighting Ships .The entry can be found here.

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<i>Dictionary of American Naval Fighting Ships</i> book

The Dictionary of American Naval Fighting Ships (DANFS) is the official reference work for the basic facts about ships used by the United States Navy.