United Nations Security Council Resolution 1487

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UN Security Council
Resolution 1487
ICC member states world map.png
States party to the International Criminal Court
Date12 June 2003
Meeting no.4,772
CodeS/RES/1487 (Document)
SubjectUnited Nations peacekeeping
Voting summary
  • 12 voted for
  • None voted against
  • 3 abstained
ResultAdopted
Security Council composition
Permanent members
Non-permanent members

United Nations Security Council resolution 1487, adopted on 12 June 2003, after noting the recent entry into force of the Rome Statute of the International Criminal Court, the Council granted a one-year extension for immunity from prosecution by the International Criminal Court (ICC) to United Nations peacekeeping personnel from countries that were not party to the ICC, beginning on 1 July 2003. [1]

Contents

The resolution was passed at the insistence of the United States and came into effect on 1 July 2003 for a period of one year. France, Germany and Syria abstained from voting, arguing there was no justification to renew the measures. [2] The Security Council refused to renew the exemption again in 2004 after pictures emerged of U.S. troops abusing Iraqi prisoners in Abu Ghraib, and the U.S. withdrew its demand. [3]

Resolution

Observations

In the preamble of the resolution, the Council noted the importance of United Nations operations in the maintenance of peace and security. It noted that not all countries were party to the ICC Statute or had chosen to accept its jurisdiction, and would continue to fulfil their responsibilities within their national jurisdictions with regard to international crimes.

Acts

Acting under Chapter VII of the United Nations Charter, the Security Council requested that the ICC, for a twelve-month period beginning on 1 July 2003, refrain from commencing or continuing investigations into personnel or officials from states not a party to the ICC Statute. [4] It expressed its intention to renew the measure within twelve months for as long as necessary. Furthermore, the resolution asked that states were to take no actions contrary to the measure and their international obligations.

See also

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References

  1. "Security Council requests one-year extension of UN peacekeeper immunity from International Criminal Court". United Nations. 12 June 2003.
  2. McGoldrick, Dominic; Rowe, Peter J.; Donnelly, Eric (2004). The permanent international criminal court: legal and policy issues . Hart Publishing. p.  420. ISBN   978-1-84113-281-5.
  3. "Q&A: International Criminal Court". BBC News. 4 March 2009.
  4. McCormack, T.; McDonald, Avril (2006). Yearbook of International Humanitarian Law – 2003, Volume 6; Volume 2003. Cambridge University Press. p. 282. ISBN   978-90-6704-203-1.