Virginia Cavaliers men's soccer

Last updated

Virginia Cavaliers men's soccer
Soccerball current event.svg 2019 Virginia Cavaliers men's soccer team
Virginia Cavaliers text logo.svg
Founded1941;78 years ago (1941)
University University of Virginia
Head coach George Gelnovatch (24th season)
Conference ACC
Location Charlottesville, VA
Stadium Klöckner Stadium
(Capacity: 8,000)
NicknameCavs, Hoos
ColorsOrange and Blue [1]
         
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Home
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Away
NCAA Tournament championships
1989, 1991, 1992, 1993, 1994, 2009, 2014
NCAA Tournament runner-up
1997
NCAA Tournament College Cup
1983, 1989, 1991, 1992, 1993, 1994, 1995, 1997, 2006, 2009, 2013, 2014
NCAA Tournament Quarterfinals
1983, 1984, 1988, 1989, 1990, 1991, 1992, 1993, 1994, 1995, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2004, 2006, 2009, 2013, 2014
NCAA Tournament appearances
1969, 1979, 1981, 1982, 1983, 1984, 1985, 1986, 1987, 1988, 1989, 1990, 1991, 1992, 1993, 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015, 2016, 2017, 2018, 2019
Conference Tournament championships
1988, 1991, 1992, 1993, 1994, 1995, 1997, 2003, 2004, 2009, 2019
Conference Regular Season championships
1969, 1970, 1979, 1984, 1986, 1987, 1988, 1989, 1990, 1991, 1992, 1995, 1996, 1998, 2000, 2001, 2005, 2010, 2019

The Virginia Cavaliers men's soccer team represent the University of Virginia in all NCAA Division I men's soccer competitions. The Virginia Cavaliers are a member of the Atlantic Coast Conference.

University of Virginia University in Charlottesville, Virginia, United States

The University of Virginia is a public research university in Charlottesville, Virginia. It was founded in 1819 by Declaration of Independence author Thomas Jefferson. It is the flagship university of Virginia and home to Jefferson's Academical Village, a UNESCO World Heritage Site. UVA is known for its historic foundations, student-run honor code, and secret societies.

NCAA Division I highest level of intercollegiate athletics sanctioned by the National Collegiate Athletic Association

NCAA Division I (D-I) is the highest level of intercollegiate athletics sanctioned by the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) in the United States. D-I schools include the major collegiate athletic powers, with larger budgets, more elaborate facilities and more athletic scholarships than Divisions II and III as well as many smaller schools committed to the highest level of intercollegiate competition.

College soccer form of soccer

College soccer is played by teams composed of soccer players who are enrolled in colleges and universities. While it is most widespread in the United States, it is also prominent in South Korea and Canada. The institutions typically hire full-time professional coaches and staff, although the student athletes are strictly amateur and are not paid. College soccer in the United States is sponsored by the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA), the sports regulatory body for major universities, and by the governing bodies for smaller universities and colleges. This sport is played on a rectangular field of the dimensions of about 64m (meters) - 70m sideline to sideline (width), and 100m - 110m goal line to goal line (length).

Contents

Virginia has an extensive reputation as one of the most elite collegiate soccer programs of the United States. [2] The program has produced several prominent United States national team players such as Claudio Reyna, John Harkes, Jeff Agoos, Ben Olsen, and Tony Meola. Former two-time U.S. national team coach Bruce Arena coached Virginia to five College Cup titles in a six-year period during the 1980s and 1990s, and his protégé George Gelnovatch has since guided the Cavaliers to five College Cup Final Fours and two NCAA Championships. [3]

United States mens national soccer team Mens national association football team representing the USA

The United States men's national soccer team (USMNT) represents the United States of America in international soccer competition. The team is controlled by the United States Soccer Federation and is a member of FIFA and Confederation of North, Central American and Caribbean Association Football.

Claudio Reyna American soccer player

Claudio Reyna is a retired American soccer player and the current director of football operations for New York City FC.

John Harkes American soccer player and coach

John Harkes is a retired American soccer player who is currently serving as head coach for Greenville Triumph SC.

The Cavaliers have, as of 2019, made the College Cup tournament bracket for a record 39 consecutive years, the most of any team in the history of the sport. The program has won seven NCAA Championships (1989, 1991, 1992, 1993, 1994, 2009, 2014) and have the most national titles of any program since 1990. Virginia ranks third overall in the sport's championship history since 1959.

History

The University of Virginia first fielded a varsity men's soccer team in 1941 as a member of the Intercollegiate Soccer Football Association. In their first season, the team posted a winless record, losing all nine of their matches. The Atlantic Coast Conference added soccer in 1955, followed by the first NCAA Men's Division I Soccer Championship in 1959. The team made their first appearance in the NCAA tournament in 1969.

The NCAA held its first men's National Collegiate Soccer Championship in 1959, with eight teams selected for the tournament. Before 1959, national champions were selected by a committee of the Intercollegiate Soccer Football Association (ISFA) based on season records and competition. In addition, the College Soccer Bowl tournament was held from 1950–1952 for the purpose of deciding a national champion on the field. The Soccer Bowl was a one-site competition involving four teams selected by college soccer administrators. However, the ISFA committee continued to select the national champion in those three years.

Atlantic Coast Conference American collegiate athletics conference

The Atlantic Coast Conference (ACC) is a collegiate athletic conference located in the Southern United States. Based in Greensboro, North Carolina, the conference consists of fifteen member universities, each of whom compete in the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA)'s Division I, with its football teams competing in the Football Bowl Subdivision (FBS), the highest levels for athletic competition in US-based collegiate sports. The ACC sponsors competition in twenty-five sports with many of its member institutions' athletic programs held in high regard nationally. Current members of the conference are Boston College, Clemson University, Duke University, Georgia Institute of Technology, Florida State University, North Carolina State University, Syracuse University, the University of Louisville, the University of Miami, the University of North Carolina, the University of Notre Dame, the University of Pittsburgh, the University of Virginia, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, and Wake Forest University.

Bruce Arena became Virginia's soccer and assistant lacrosse coach in 1978, moving exclusively to soccer in 1985. The Cavaliers' first tournament victory, over William and Mary in 1983 (a team featuring future comedian Jon Stewart), sparked a run to their first College Cup appearance.

Bruce Arena American soccer coach

Bruce Arena is an American soccer coach who is currently is the head coach and sporting director of the New England Revolution. He is a member of the National Soccer Hall of Fame and the NJCAA Lacrosse Hall of Fame. Arena has had a long and distinguished coaching career and is considered to be one of the most successful coaches in North American soccer history, having won five College Cup titles and five MLS Cup titles. He was the United States national team head coach at the 1996 Summer Olympics, the 2002 FIFA World Cup and the 2006 FIFA World Cup, head coach of the New York Red Bulls, D.C. United, and LA Galaxy in Major League Soccer, and coached Virginia Cavaliers men's soccer to several college soccer championships. He is the U.S. soccer team's longest-serving head coach.

Virginia Cavaliers mens lacrosse Mens lacrosse team representing the University of Virginia

The Virginia Cavaliers men's lacrosse team represents the University of Virginia in National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Division I men's lacrosse. Virginia currently competes as a member of the Atlantic Coast Conference (ACC) and plays its home games at Klöckner Stadium, or occasionally Turf Field or Scott Stadium, in Charlottesville, Virginia. Claiming eight national titles and most recently winning the 2019 NCAA Lacrosse Championship, Virginia is one of the all-time great collegiate lacrosse programs. With a record of 17–0, Virginia's 2006 team set the NCAA record for wins in a season and are the most recent undefeated national champions of the sport.

William & Mary Tribe mens soccer

The William & Mary Tribe men's soccer team represents the College of William & Mary in NCAA Division I college soccer. The team belongs to the Colonial Athletic Association and plays home games at Albert-Daly Field. As of the 2019 season, the Tribe are led by 16th-year head coach Chris Norris. The team has an all-time record 559–319–108 (.630) since its founding in 1967. The Tribe have made 15 appearances in the NCAA tournament with a combined record of 9–15–2.

The Cavaliers have qualified for the NCAA tournament every year since 1981; those 39 appearances are a record for men's soccer and one of the longest streaks in any NCAA sport. Their apex came in the late 1980s to early 1990s under Arena, when the team won five national collegiate championships in the span of six years. Future U.S. men's national team stars such as John Harkes and Claudio Reyna were members of these championship teams.

Virginia's first championship, in 1989, came in one of the most famous games in the history of college soccer. Played at Rutgers University on December 3 against Santa Clara, the wind chill was ten degrees below zero at kickoff and fell further during the game. Virginia led the defensive slugfest 1–0 before a rare mistake from Curt Onalfo in the 84th minute allowed Santa Clara to send the game to overtime. As NCAA rules had recently changed to limit games to one 30-minute overtime followed by a 30-minute sudden-death period – after the 1985 final required eight 10-minute extra periods – and did not allow penalty kicks in the final, Virginia and Santa Clara were declared co-champions when the game remained tied 1–1 after 150 minutes. [4]

The Cavaliers went on to win the 1991, 1992, 1993, and 1994 editions of the tournament, and as the first overall seed were upset in the semifinals in 1995. The four consecutive championships remains an NCAA record; no other team managed even three in a row until Stanford did so in 2017.

Arena departed for the new men's professional league Major League Soccer in 1996, where he led D.C. United to three MLS Cup titles, two Supporters' Shields and a CONCACAF Champions League title. He was replaced by longtime assistant George Gelnovatch, who remains the coach today. Gelnovatch returned the team to the 1997 final, where they lost 2–0 to UCLA.

After a string of early-round exits in the late 1990s and early 2000s, the team returned to the College Cup in 2006 and the national championship game in 2009. Playing against the upstart Akron Zips that year, the Cavaliers were able to prevail in a penalty kick shootout to claim their sixth NCAA title, and their first national championship since the Arena years. Virginia added a seventh NCAA championship by defeating UCLA in a shootout in the 2014 tournament.

Stadium

One of the earliest soccer-specific stadiums in college soccer, the Virginia Cavaliers men's soccer team plays their home matches at the 8,000-seater Klöckner Stadium. Since its opening in 1997, the Cavaliers have enjoyed some of the highest reported attendance figures in American college soccer.

The stadium has 3,600 grandstand seats along with an additional 3,400 grass seats. It is shared with the women's soccer team, as well as the men's and women's lacrosse teams. [5]

Rivalries

Maryland

Both UVA and Maryland have NCAA Championship programs in men's soccer. The Virginia Cavaliers have won seven NCAA Championships to Maryland's four. When they were both in the Atlantic Coast Conference, some cited the rivalry between the Cavaliers and the Maryland Terrapins as one of the most bitter rivalries in college soccer. [6] In 2011, FirstPoint USA rated the rivalry as the third best rivalry in college soccer. [7]

The Terrapins' departure to the Big Ten has put the annual rivalry on hiatus. Maryland recorded a 1–0 victory in the 2015 NCAA tournament and No. 12 Virginia dethroned No. 1 Maryland, 2–0, in a regular season game on September 2, 2019, helping Virginia to take over the No. 1 ranking weeks later.

Virginia Tech

As intra-conference members, and having a longstanding rivalry, another one of the top rivals of the Virginia Cavaliers is the Virginia Tech Hokies. The series between the two has been heavily dominated by the Cavaliers, who boast a 31–2–5 record and 14-match unbeaten streak against the Hokies. [8] [9]

Roster

Current roster

Updated August 20, 2019 [10]

Note: Flags indicate national team as defined under FIFA eligibility rules. Players may hold more than one non-FIFA nationality.

No.PositionPlayer
00 Flag of the United States.svg GK Tyler Willen
0 Flag of the United States.svg GK Chris Shutler
1 Flag of the United States.svg GK Colin Shutler
2 Flag of the United States.svg DF Eben Noverr
3 Flag of the United States.svg DF Max Diamond
4 Flag of the United States.svg DF Reed Kessler
5 Flag of the United States.svg DF Henry Kessler
6 Flag of Jamaica.svg MF Jeremy Verly
7 Flag of Scotland.svg FW Daniel Steedman
8 Flag of New Zealand.svg MF Joe Bell
9 Flag of the United States.svg FW Daryl Dike
10 Flag of England.svg FW Nathaniel Crofts
11 Flag of the United States.svg FW Irakoze Donasiyano
12 Flag of the United States.svg DF Spencer Patton
No.PositionPlayer
13 Flag of the United States.svg MF Bret Halsey
15 Flag of the United States.svg FW Philip Horton
16 Flag of the United States.svg FW Jerren Nixon
17 Flag of Norway.svg DF Andreas Ueland
18 Flag of Sweden.svg FW Axel Gunnarsson
19 Flag of the United States.svg MF Nick Berghold
20 Flag of Zimbabwe.svg FW Cabrel Happi Kamseu
21 Flag of the United States.svg MF Aaron James
23 Flag of New Zealand.svg FW Matthew Warbrick
24 Flag of the United States.svg MF Isaiah Byrd
26 Flag of the United States.svg MF Ben Grant
27 Flag of the United States.svg MF Beau Bradley
30 Flag of Germany.svg DF Robin Afamefuna
99 Flag of the United States.svg GK Marcel DaSilva
24 Flag of the United States.svg MF Isaiah Byrd

Team management

Coaching staff

PositionStaff
Athletic Director Carla Williams
Head Coach George Gelnovatch
Associate Head Coach Matt Chulis
Assistant CoachRyan Hopkins
Performance AnalystCarl Carpenter

Source: [11]

Head coaching history

DatesNameNotes
1941–1950 Flag of the United States.svg Lawrence Ludwig
1951–1953 Flag of the United States.svg Hugh Moomaw
1954 Flag of the United States.svg Wilson Fewster
1955–1957 Flag of the United States.svg Robert Sandell
1958–1965 Flag of the United States.svg Gene Corrigan
1966–1970 Flag of the United States.svg Gordon Burris
1971–1973 Flag of the United States.svg Jim Stephens
1974–1977 Flag of the United States.svg Larry Gross
1978–1995 Flag of the United States.svg Bruce Arena
1996–present Flag of the United States.svg George Gelnovatch

Seasons

Source: [1]

SeasonCoachOverallConferenceStandingPostseason
Virginia(Independent)(1941–1953)
1941Lawrence Ludwig0–9–0
1942Lawrence Ludwig4–2–1
1943–1945No team due to World War II
1946Lawrence Ludwig1–3–1
1947Lawrence Ludwig2–7–2
1948Lawrence Ludwig3–7–1
1949Lawrence Ludwig5–5–0
1950Lawrence Ludwig4–5–1
1951Hugh Moomaw1–5–2
1952Hugh Moomaw5–2–2
1953Hugh Moomaw4–4–1
Virginia(ACC)(1953–present)
1954Wilson Fewster2–4–21–1–24th
1955Robert Sandell3–5–21–2–13rd
1956Robert Sandell6–3–03–1–02nd
1957Robert Sandell5–2–12–1–12nd
1958 Gene Corrigan 5–4–01–3–04th
1959Gene Corrigan3–4–22–2–03rd
1960Gene Corrigan3–7–01–3–04th
1961Gene Corrigan9–3–01–3–04th VISA Champions
1962Gene Corrigan5–4–11–3–04th VISA Champions
1963Gene Corrigan7–2–12–1–12nd VISA Champions
1964Gene Corrigan4–5–20–4–05th
1965Gene Corrigan3–6–12–2–03rd
1966Gordon Burris0–10–00–4–06th
1967Gordon Burris3–9–00–4–06th
1968Gordon Burris4–5–11–3–16th
1969Gordon Burris9–1–24–0–11st VISA Co-Champions
NCAA First Round
1970Gordon Burris8–2–13–1–01st VISA Champions
1971Jim Stephens7–5–11–3–16th
1972Jim Stephens8–3–31–2–24th
1973Jim Stephens6–7–01–4–06th
1974Larry Gross5–4–33–2–03rd
1975Larry Gross5–8–00–5–06th
1976Larry Gross8–6–22–2–13rd
1977Larry Gross12–6–12–3–04th VISA Champions
1978 Bruce Arena 9–2–23–2–03rd
1979Bruce Arena12–4–13–1–13rd NCAA Second Round
1980Bruce Arena8–9–12–3–15th
1981Bruce Arena10–6–22–4–06th VISA Champions
NCAA Second Round
1982Bruce Arena16–2–23–1–23rd VISA Champions
NCAA Second Round
1983Bruce Arena16–5–05–1–01st NCAA College Cup
1984Bruce Arena19–3–16–0–01st VISA Champions
NCAA Quarterfinals
1985Bruce Arena15–4–14–1–12nd NCAA First Round
1986Bruce Arena17–2–26–0–01st NCAA First Round
1987Bruce Arena17–3–25–0–11st ACC Semifinals [lower-alpha 1]
NCAA Second Round
1988Bruce Arena18–1–35–0–11st ACC Champions
NCAA Quarterfinals
1989 Bruce Arena21–2–25–0–11st NCAA Co-Champions
1990Bruce Arena12–6–63–2–13rd NCAA Second Round
1991 Bruce Arena19–1–25–1–01st ACC Champions
NCAA Champions
1992Bruce Arena21–2–15–1–01st ACC Champions
NCAA Champions
1993Bruce Arena22–3–04–2–03rd ACC Champions
NCAA Champions
1994Bruce Arena22–3–14–2–02nd ACC Champions
NCAA Champions
1995Bruce Arena21–1–24–0–21st ACC Champions
NCAA College Cup
1996 George Gelnovatch 16–3–34–0–21st NCAA First Round
1997George Gelnovatch19–4–33–1–22nd ACC Champions
NCAA Runners-Up
1998George Gelnovatch16–4–34–1–12nd NCAA Quarterfinals
1999George Gelnovatch14–9–11–4–16th NCAA Quarterfinals
2000George Gelnovatch17–6–15–1–01st NCAA Quarterfinals
2001George Gelnovatch17–2–16–0–01st NCAA Second Round
2002George Gelnovatch15–7–03–3–04th NCAA Second Round
2003George Gelnovatch11–10–23–3–03rd NCAA Third Round
2004George Gelnovatch18–5–14–3–14th NCAA Quarterfinals
2005George Gelnovatch12–5–36–2–02nd NCAA Third Round
2006George Gelnovatch17–4–15–3–03rd NCAA College Cup
2007George Gelnovatch12–8–21–5–28th NCAA Second Round
2008George Gelnovatch11–9–14–4–04th NCAA Second Round
2009George Gelnovatch19–3–34–3–15th NCAA Champions
2010George Gelnovatch11–6–32–4–26th NCAA First Round
2011 George Gelnovatch12–8–14–3–13rd ACC Semifinals
NCAA First Round
2012 George Gelnovatch10–7–13–4–16th ACC Semifinals
NCAA Second Round
2013 George Gelnovatch13–6–54–3–46th ACC Runners-up
NCAA College Cup
2014 George Gelnovatch13–6–43–3–24th, Coastal ACC Quarterfinals
NCAA Champions
2015 George Gelnovatch10–5–34–2–23rd, Coastal ACC Quarterfinals
NCAA Second Round
2016 George Gelnovatch10–3–54–2–32nd, Coastal ACC Quarterfinals
NCAA Third Round
2017 George Gelnovatch13–4–53–2–33rd, Coastal ACC Runners-up
NCAA Second Round
2018 George Gelnovatch10–4–33–2–23rd, Coastal ACC First Round
NCAA Third Round
2019 George Gelnovatch17–1–16–1–11st, Coastal ACC Champions
NCAA TBD
Total:TBD

      National champion        Postseason invitational champion  
      Conference regular season champion        Conference regular season and conference tournament champion
      Division regular season champion      Division regular season and conference tournament champion
      Conference tournament champion

Source:

Honors

Notable alumni

* - Player has represented their country at the senior national team level

Notes

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2019 Virginia Cavaliers mens soccer team

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Lars Tiffany is an American lacrosse coach. He is the current head coach of the Virginia Cavaliers men's lacrosse program at the University of Virginia. Tiffany has brought one of the all-time great lacrosse programs back to national prominence and won the 2019 NCAA Championship with the Cavaliers. He was named 2019 ACC Coach of the Year. As with his predecessor Dom Starsia, Tiffany came to Virginia after coaching his alma mater at Brown. There he was the 2015 and 2016 Ivy League Coach of the Year.

References

General
Citations
  1. University of Virginia Athletics Current Logo Sheet (PDF). July 10, 2017. Retrieved April 1, 2019.
  2. Teel, David (December 15, 2014). "Virginia men's soccer joins elite ACC company with seventh NCAA title". Daily Press . Retrieved December 29, 2017.
  3. Virginia wins 7th NCAA Championship in shootout versus UCLA, accessed December 14, 2014
  4. Goff, Steven (December 4, 1989). "Virginia, Santa Clara tie for title". Washington Post.
  5. "Klöckner Stadium and Team Locker Rooms". University of Virginia. Retrieved August 19, 2011.
  6. "Virginia, Maryland Renew Men's Soccer Rivalry This Weekend". University of Virginia. CBSSports.com. September 12, 1998. Retrieved August 19, 2011.
  7. CollegeSoccerNews.com (May 9, 2011). "The 5 Greatest Rivalries in College Soccer". First Point USA. Archived from the original on March 30, 2012.
  8. "#4 VIRGINIA vs. #16 VIRGINIA TECH" (PDF).
  9. "Men's soccer: No. 10 UVA, No. 21 Virginia Tech play to 1-1 draw". Augusta Free Press. September 8, 2018.
  10. "2019 Men's Soccer Roster". virginiasports.com. University of Virginia. Retrieved August 20, 2019.
  11. "Men's Soccer Coaches". University of Virginia Athletics. Retrieved August 20, 2019.
  12. "ACC Men's Soccer Record Book" (PDF). Atlantic Coast Conference . theacc.com. November 16, 2017. p. 92. Retrieved November 25, 2017.
  13. "Virginia Tech-Virginia Men's Soccer Series History". hokiesports.com. September 15, 2017. Retrieved November 25, 2017.