Vishwakarma Puja

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Vishwakarma Jayanti
Also calledVishwakarma Day,
Vishwakarma Puja
Observed by Karnataka,
Uttar Pradesh,
West Bengal,
Tripura,
Bihar,
Odisha,
Jharkhand,
Assam
TypeHindu
Celebrations Vishwakarma Puja
DateKanya Sankranti; Last day of Bhadra [1] [2]
(16/17 September)
Frequencyannual

Vishwakarma Jayanti is a day of celebration for Vishwakarma, a Hindu god, the divine architect. [3] He is considered as swayambhu and creator of the world. He constructed the holy city of Dwarka where Krishna ruled, the Maya Sabha of the Pandavas, and was the creator of many fabulous weapons for the gods. He is also called the divine carpenter, is mentioned in the Rig Veda , and is credited with Sthapatya Veda, the science of mechanics and architecture.

When is -

It falls on 'Kanya Sankranti' of Hindu Calendar. [1] [2] It is generally celebrated every year on gregorean date of 16 or 19 September which is on the last day of the Indian Bhado month, in Solar calendar. Solar Calendar observed by states such as Assam, Uttar Pradesh, Karnataka, West Bengal, Bihar, Jharkhand, Odisha, and Tripura. The festival is also celebrated in its neighbouring country Nepal.

About him-

According to sacred Hindu tradition, Vishwakarma is known as the Divine Engineer of the world. Like every other God, Vishwakarma is assigned a day that is his birthday or Jayanti that is Vishwakarma Jayanti. The problem with this is that since he is known as the original creator of the world, he existed a few days before he created the world.

Vishwakarma Ji had five Sons and two Daughters. Name of Son's – Mannu, Maidev, Tavashta, Shilpi and Devagya. The divine draftsman Vishwakarma is the presiding deity of all craftsmen and architects. Son of Brahma, he is the divine draftsman of the whole universe, and the official builder of all the gods' palaces.

On that day -

The festival is observed primarily in factories and industrial areas, often on the shop floor. As a mark of reverence the day of worship is marked not only by the engineering and architectural community but by artisans, craftsmen, mechanics, smiths, welders, industrial workers, factory workers and others. They pray for a better future, safe working conditions and, above all, success in their respective fields. Workers also pray for the smooth functioning of various machines.

Vishwakarma puja is also celebrated a day after Diwali, along with Govardhan Puja in October–November. [4]


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References

  1. 1 2 "विश्वकर्मा पूजा: जानें महत्व और जन्म की कहानी". Aajtak. 17 September 2017. Retrieved 22 July 2019.
  2. 1 2 "All About Lord Vishwakarma and Vishwakarma Puja". Hind Utsav. Retrieved 22 July 2019.
  3. Melton, J. Gordon (13 September 2011). Religious Celebrations: An Encyclopedia of Holidays, Festivals, Solemn Observances, and Spiritual Commemorations. ABC-CLIO. pp. 908–. ISBN   978-1-59884-205-0.
  4. Shobna Gupta (2010). Festivals Of India. Har-Anand Publications. pp. 84–. ISBN   978-81-241-1277-9.


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