Wakesurfing

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An example of someone wakesurfing. Andy wakesurfing.jpg
An example of someone wakesurfing.
Wakesurfing

Wakesurfing is a water sport in which a rider trails behind a boat, riding the boat's wake without being directly pulled by the boat. [1] After getting up on the wake, typically by use of a tow rope, the wakesurfers will drop the rope, and ride the steep face below the wave's peak in a fashion reminiscent of surfing. Wakesurfers generally use special boards, designed specifically for wakes.

Contents

History

The origins of wakesurfing are somewhat disputed with multiple people and companies claiming to be at the genesis of the sport. Some claims have set the dates for the origins of boat-surfing or wake-surfing as far back as the 1920s. However, no credible evidence of this is available. Footage and print media from the 1950s and 1960s show ocean surfers actively riding surfboards behind motor boats. By the mid 60's numerous surfboard manufacturers laid claims to building wake specific boards.

The practice of riding surfboards behind boats continued through the 70s and 80s with the boards being ridden evolving to shorter forms right along the shortboard revolution in Surfing. As boards progressively shortened in length, taking a page from windsurfing or sailboarding many practitioners started using devices mounted to the board to strap and secure their feet in place. Aided with a tow rope, hard carving and launching off wakes lead to sports like skurfing, skiboarding, and eventually wakeboarding.

Wakeboarding's growth and mass appeal led the watercraft industry to advance technology to increase the size of wakes. This, in turn, provided an opportunity for wakesurfing to emerge from the shadows. Several sport pioneers, including, but not limited to Tim Lopes, Jerry Price, Jeff Page, Rick Lee, Mark Sher, and others are noted with being at the forefront of modern wakesurfing. The first US design patent for a wakesurf was granted to Alfonso Corona in 1997.

Dangers

With the rise of wakesurfing in recent years many individuals have attempted surfing behind boats ill-equipped to wakesurf. Boats with outboard motors or sterndrive propulsion are not suited for wake surfing and lead to heighted risk, possible maiming or even death. [2] The only types of boats safe to surf behind are direct drive or V-drive boats, this is because the propeller is located far beneath the boat rather than behind the boat. [3]

Another risk associated with ill-equipped boats is Carbon Monoxide Poisoning. Boats designed for wake surfing direct the boat exhaust downward into the propeller stream, pushing the exhaust far away from the rider.

Boat setup

Inboard ski or wakeboard boats [4] are the most popular choice for this sport as the propeller is under the boat, and is less likely to make contact with the rider. Owners of inboard boats place ballast, such as water, lead weights, concrete, or other heavy objects in different sections of the boat in order to weight the boat down and create a larger wake. The best weight configuration for wakesurfing is to place the majority of the weight near the back corner side the surfer is surfing on. [5] The deeper the boat is in the water, the bigger the wake will be overall. In addition, one will want to place a larger amount at the stern of the boat on the side which the rider is riding. This will ramp the wake up on the side the rider is riding and washout the opposite side. [6] A rope length of 8 to 10 feet is recommended. Wakesurf-intended ropes are generally 20 feet long, making it ideal for boats that have a tower set-up. Long ski and wakeboard ropes can become hazardous for wakesurfing, because it usually involves winding up the rope or tying unnecessary knots.

Notable wakesurfers

Trick list

Many riders perform a wide array of maneuvers or specifically named 'tricks' while wakesurfing, with most owing their origins to surfing, skating (both vert and street) and snowboarding, Some of the most well-known tricks are:

In 2013, Canadian musician Chris Hau recorded a video in which he plays a song on an acoustic guitar while wakesurfing. [11] [12]

In February 2015, Hunter Sims, a professional wakesurfer, received a world record for doing 106 shove-its. [13]

Many celebrities have taken up the sport with P!nk, Julianne Hough, and Gus Kenworthy among the ones spending their summers trying the activity. [14]

World Champion Skimboarder Austin Keen [15] launched an interview series with celebrities wakesurfing in 2020. His first guest was Diplo. [16]

Related Research Articles

Surfing Sport of riding waves

Surfing is a surface water sport in which an individual, a surfer, uses a board to ride on the forward section, or face, of a moving wave of water, which usually carries the surfer towards the shore. Waves suitable for surfing are primarily found on ocean shores, but can also be found in standing waves in the open ocean, in lakes, in rivers in the form of a tidal bore, or in wave pools.

Wakeboarding Surface water sport

Wakeboarding is a water sport in which the rider, standing on a wakeboard, is towed behind a motorboat across its wake and especially up off the crest in order to perform aerial maneuvers. A hallmark of wakeboarding is the attempted performance of midair tricks. Wakeboarding was developed from a combination of water skiing, snowboarding and surfing techniques.

Boardsports are sports that are played with some sort of board as the primary equipment. These sports take place on a variety of terrain, from paved flat-ground and snow-covered hills to water and air. Most boardsports are considered action sports or extreme sports, and thus often appeal to youth. A large proportion of youth partaking in these sports, together with aesthetic damage to property from sports like skateboarding, has led to many board sports being marginalized by the greater world of sports in the past. However, many board sports are ever-more frequently gaining mainstream recognition, and with this recognition have enjoyed wider broadcast, sponsorship and inclusion in institutional sporting events, including the Olympic Games.

Kickflip

The kickflip is a maneuver in skateboarding in which the rider flips their skateboard 360° along the axis that extends from the nose to the tail of the deck. When the rider is regular footed the board spins counter-clockwise if viewed from the back.

Bodyboarding is a water sport in which the surfer rides a bodyboard on the crest, face, and curl of a wave which is carrying the surfer towards the shore. Bodyboarding is also referred to as Boogieboarding due to the invention of the "Boogie Board" by Tom Morey in 1971.The average bodyboard consists of a short, rectangular piece of hydrodynamic foam. Bodyboarders typically use swim fins for additional propulsion and control while riding a breaking wave.

Surfboard Platform board used in the sport of surfing

A surfboard is a narrow plank used in surfing. Surfboards are relatively light, but are strong enough to support an individual standing on them while riding an ocean wave. They were invented in ancient Hawaii, where they were known as papa he'e nalu in the Hawaiian language, they were usually made of wood from local trees, such as koa, and were often over 460 cm (15 ft) in length and extremely heavy. Major advances over the years include the addition of one or more fins (skegs) on the bottom rear of the board to improve directional stability, and numerous improvements in materials and shape.

Kiteboarding Extreme sport

Kiteboarding or kitesurfing is an extreme sport where the kiter uses the wind power with a large power kite to be pulled on a water, land or snow surface. It combines aspects of paragliding, surfing, windsurfing, skateboarding, snowboarding and wakeboarding. Kiteboarding is among the less expensive and the more convenient of the sailing sports.

Skimboarding Boardsport

Skimboarding or skimming is a boardsport in which a skimboard is used to glide across the water's surface to meet an incoming breaking wave, and ride it back to shore. Wave-riding skimboarders perform a variety of surface and air maneuvers, at various stages of their ride, out to, and back with, the wave. Some of these are known as "wraps," "big spins," "360 shove-its" and "180s." Unlike surfing, skimboarding begins on the beach by dropping the board onto the thin wash of previous waves. Skimboarders use their momentum to skim out to breaking waves, which they then catch back into shore in a manner similar to surfing.

Kneeboarding (towsport) Water sport

Kneeboarding is an aquatic sport where the participant is towed on a buoyant, convex, and hydrodynamically shaped board at a planing speed, most often behind a motorboat. Kneeboarding on a surf style board with fin(s) is also done in waves at the beach. In the usual configuration of a tow-sport kneeboard, riders kneel on their heels on the board, and secure themselves to the deck with an adjustable Velcro strap over their thighs. Most water ski kneeboards do not have fins to allow for easier surface spins. As in wakeboarding or water skiing, the rider hangs onto a tow-rope. The advantages of kneeboarding versus other tow-sports seems to be an easier learning curve and a sense of being closer to the water when falls occur.

Surfboard leash

A leg rope or surfboard leash is a urethane cord attached to the deck of a surfboard, down near the tail. It prevents the surfboard from being swept away by waves and stops runaway surfboards from hitting other surfers and swimmers. Modern leashes consist of a urethane cord where one end has a band with a velcro strap attached to the surfer's trailing foot, and the opposite has a velcro strap attached to the tail end of the surfboard. Should the surfer fall while riding a wave, the surfboard will not be swept away, thus allowing the surfer to quickly recover his surfboard and return to the take-off zone.

Frontside and backside are surfing, skateboarding, snowboarding and aggressive inline skating terms that are used to describe how a person approaches an obstacle or performs a certain trick. In Aggressive Skating, frontside and backside are types of grinds.

Freestyle BMX Cycle sport

Freestyle BMX is bicycle motocross stunt riding on BMX bikes. It is an extreme sport descended from BMX racing that consists of five disciplines: street, park, vert, trails, and flatland. In June 2017, the International Olympic Committee announced that it was to be added as an Olympic event to the 2020 Summer Olympics.

Pineboarding

Pineboarding is a recreational activity in which a participant rides down the pine-needle-covered slopes of pine forests on a skateboard deck.

Artificial waves are human-made waves usually created on a specially designed surface or in a pool.

A freestyle skateboarding trick is a trick performed with a skateboard while freestyle skateboarding. Some of these tricks are done in a stationary position, unlike many other skateboarding tricks. The keys to a good freestyle contest run are variety, difficulty, fluidity, and creativity. This is an incomplete list, which includes most notable tricks.

The Super Air Nautique line-up of Nautique Boats is Correct Craft's crossover-wakeboarding focused model; the boat is outfitted for wakeboarding with a tower and ballast tanks from the factory. Furthermore, some air nautiques are in V-drive format, which creates a bigger wake for the rider. The first Air Nautique was built in 1997; it was built on the existing Sport Nautique Hull and had an automatic rear ballast system. Other notable "landmarks" included Correct Craft's patented "Flight Control Tower", which was essentially a modified fishing tower. In 2019 Nautique released the Super Air Nautique Paragon, this new release is the most expensive boat Nautique has created.

Horse surfing is an extreme sport invented in 2005. It requires two people, a horse, and a board. Horse surfing involves one person riding either a kite-board, surfboard, wake-board, or skim-board, while being towed behind a horse, ridden by a second person, through shallow water, at speeds up to 40 miles per hour (64 km/h). After originating in England the first official horse surfing competition was held in 2006 in La Baule, France, and over the last 14 years the sport has continued to spread internationally. Today there are several international competitions with globally established rules and categories.

References

  1. WakeSurfing, Wake Surfing, Wake boarding, WakeSports
  2. https://www.ridingboards.com/can-you-wakesurf-behind-any-boat/
  3. https://www.wspa.com/news/wakesurfing-how-to-surf-on-the-lake-safely/
  4. wakeboard boats
  5. WakeMAKERS. "Weight Your Boat for Wakesurfing" . Retrieved 4 April 2014.
  6. Fly High. "How to Weigh a V-Drive Ski/Wakeboard Boat" (PDF). Retrieved 2 November 2011.
  7. Boarders (October 6, 2014). 2014 World Wake Surf Championship, Las Vegas". Retrieved 22 July 2016.
  8. Centurion Boats (October 2015). "The 2015 World Wake Surfing Championship presented by GM Marine Completes Three Days of Amazing Wake Surfing Competition". Retrieved 22 July 2016
  9. Centurionboats.com September 8, 2019 The 2019 Centurion Boats World Wake Surf Championship Comes to a Close [https://centurionboats.com/the-2019-centurion-boats-world-wake-surf-championship-comes-to-a-close/
  10. "Drew Danielo". Phase 5 Wakesurf Boards. Retrieved 2021-03-18.
  11. Mills, Carys (2 August 2013). "Does this wake-surfing singer have what it takes to go viral?". Toronto Star. Retrieved 17 September 2013.
  12. Cross, Alan (1 August 2013). "Canadian Dude Sings, Plays Guitar and Surfs AT THE SAME TIME". AlanCross. Retrieved 17 September 2013.
  13. "Most consecutive wakesurfing shove its". Guinness World Records. Retrieved 2016-10-24.
  14. "Wakesurfing Stars -- What A Ride!". TMZ. Retrieved 2021-06-01.
  15. "About Austin Keen - World Champion Skimboarder Professional". AK Companies. Retrieved 2021-06-01.
  16. "Austin Keen and Diplo | Celebrity Surf Series". Unleashed Wake Mag. 2020-01-21. Retrieved 2021-06-01.