Watjulum frog

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Watjulum frog
Litoria watjulumensis.jpg
Scientific classification
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Species:
L. watjulumensis
Binomial name
Litoria watjulumensis
(Copland, 1957) [2]
Litoria watjulumensis map-fr.svg
Synonyms

Hyla wotjulumensis Tyler 1968

The Wotjulum frog (Litoria watjulumensis) is a species of frog in the family Hylidae. Its habitats are subtropical or tropical dry forests, subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests, subtropical or tropical swamps, rivers, intermittent rivers, swamps, freshwater lakes, freshwater marshes, intermittent freshwater marshes, and rocky areas.

Hylidae family of amphibians

The Hylidae are a wide-ranging family of frogs commonly referred to as "tree frogs and their allies". However, the hylids include a diversity of frog species, many of which do not live in trees, but are terrestrial or semiaquatic.

Habitat ecological or environmental area inhabited by a particular species; natural environment in which an organism lives, or the physical environment that surrounds a species population

In ecology, a habitat is the type of natural environment in which a particular species of organism lives. It is characterized by both physical and biological features. A species' habitat is those places where it can find food, shelter, protection and mates for reproduction.

L. watjulumensis was named for Watjulum Mission in the north of Western Australia, a sometimes spelled 'wotjulum'. This has led to variants in the common names and the specific epithet, repeating the spelling of Tyler's publication as Hyla wotjulumensis. The common names include Watjulum or Wotjulum frog, Watjulum Mission tree frog, and giant or large rocket frog. [3]

Western Australia State in Australia

Western Australia is a state occupying the entire western third of Australia. It is bounded by the Indian Ocean to the north and west, and the Southern Ocean to the south, the Northern Territory to the north-east, and South Australia to the south-east. Western Australia is Australia's largest state, with a total land area of 2,529,875 square kilometres, and the second-largest country subdivision in the world, surpassed only by Russia's Sakha Republic. The state has about 2.6 million inhabitants – around 11 percent of the national total – of whom the vast majority live in the south-west corner, 79 per cent of the population living in the Perth area, leaving the remainder of the state sparsely populated.

Professor Michael J. Tyler generally known as "Mike Tyler", dubbed "The Frog Man", was a South Australian herpetologist and academic, noted for his research on frogs and toads, chiefly with the University of Adelaide.

In biology, a common name of a taxon or organism is a name that is based on the normal language of everyday life; this kind of name is often contrasted with the scientific name for the same organism, which is Latinized. A common name is sometimes frequently used, but that is by no means always the case.

The publication of the species was based on a type collection by Copland. The collection, 29 specimens at the Western Australian Museum, was reassigned as three syntypes; for this species, Litoria coplandi , and Litoria peronii . [4] The type for Litoria watjulumensis was collected near Watjulum mission "close to Yampi Sound, north of King Sound". [2]

The Western Australian Museum is the state museum for Western Australia. It has six main sites: in Perth within the Perth Cultural Centre, two in Fremantle, and one each in Albany, Geraldton, and Kalgoorlie-Boulder. The Western Australian Museum is a statutory authority within the Culture and the Arts Portfolio, established under the Museum Act 1969.

In biological nomenclature, a syntype is any one of two or more biological types that is listed in a description of a taxon where no holotype was designated. Precise definitions of this and related terms for types have been established as part of the International Code of Zoological Nomenclature and the International Code of Nomenclature for algae, fungi, and plants.

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References

  1. Hero, J.-M., Roberts, D., Horner, P. & Retallick, R. 2004. Litoria watjulumensis. 2006 IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Downloaded on 21 July 2007.
  2. 1 2 Department of the Environment and Water Resources. "Species: Litoria watjulumensis (Copland, 1957) Copland's Rock Frog". Australian faunal Directory. Australian Government.
  3. Frost, Darrel. "Litoria watjulumensis (Copland, 1957)". Amphibian Species of the World 5.3 (online). The American Museum of Natural History. Retrieved 13 July 2009.
  4. Tyler, M.J. 1968. A taxonomic study of hylid frogs of the Hyla lesueuri complex occurring in north-western Australia. Records of the South Australian Museum 15: 711–727 [716].