Watson-Sanders House

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Watson-Sanders House
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Location2810 Brogden Rd., Smithfield, North Carolina
Coordinates 35°28′07″N78°19′34″W / 35.46861°N 78.32611°W / 35.46861; -78.32611 Coordinates: 35°28′07″N78°19′34″W / 35.46861°N 78.32611°W / 35.46861; -78.32611
Area12 acres (4.9 ha)
Builtc. 1820 (1820), c. 1854
Architectural styleI-house, Greek Revival
NRHP reference # 01000015 [1]
Added to NRHPJanuary 26, 2001

Watson-Sanders House is a historic home located near Smithfield, Johnston County, North Carolina. It was built about 1820, and is a two-story, three bay, frame I-house dwelling. It has a double engaged front piazza, an original rear shed piazza. The interior was remodeled in the Greek Revival style, when the house was moved to its present site in 1854. [2]

Smithfield, North Carolina Town in North Carolina, United States

Smithfield is a town in and the county seat of Johnston County, North Carolina, United States. As of the 2010 census the population was 10,966, and in 2018 the estimated population was 12,669. Smithfield is home to the Ava Gardner Museum and is situated along the Neuse River, where visitors enjoy the annual Smithfield Ham and Yam Festival, walks along the Buffalo Creek Greenway, and the historic downtown district. The town is located near North Carolina's famed Research Triangle and is approximately 30 miles (48 km) southeast of downtown Raleigh. The Raleigh-Durham-Cary Combined Statistical area has a population of over 2 million residents.

Johnston County, North Carolina County in North Carolina, United States

Johnston County is a county located in the U.S. state of North Carolina. As of the 2010 census, the population was 168,878. Its county seat is Smithfield.

I-house

The I-house is a vernacular house type, popular in the United States from the colonial period onward. The I-house was so named in the 1930s by Fred Kniffen, a cultural geographer at Louisiana State University who was a specialist in folk architecture. He identified and analyzed the type in his 1936 study of Louisiana house types. He chose the name "I-house" because of its common occurrence in the rural farm areas of Indiana, Illinois and Iowa, all states beginning with the letter "I". He did not use the term to imply that this house type originated in, or was restricted to, those three states. It is also referred to as Plantation Plain style.

It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 2001. [1]

National Register of Historic Places Federal list of historic sites in the United States

The National Register of Historic Places (NRHP) is the United States federal government's official list of districts, sites, buildings, structures and objects deemed worthy of preservation for their historical significance. A property listed in the National Register, or located within a National Register Historic District, may qualify for tax incentives derived from the total value of expenses incurred in preserving the property.

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References

  1. 1 2 "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places . National Park Service. 2010-07-09.
  2. M. Ruth Little (August 2000). "Watson-Sanders House" (pdf). National Register of Historic Places - Nomination and Inventory. North Carolina State Historic Preservation Office. Retrieved 2015-01-01.