Waverly Historic District (Columbia, South Carolina)

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Waverly Historic District
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Location Roughly bounded by Hampton St., Heidt St., Gervais St., and Harden St., Columbia, South Carolina
Coordinates 34°00′33″N81°01′03″W / 34.00917°N 81.01750°W / 34.00917; -81.01750 Coordinates: 34°00′33″N81°01′03″W / 34.00917°N 81.01750°W / 34.00917; -81.01750
Area 33 acres (13 ha)
Architect Lankford, John Anderson; Wilson, Charles Coker
Architectural style Late 19th And Early 20th Century American Movements, Late 19th And 20th Century Revivals
NRHP reference # 89002154 [1]
Added to NRHP December 21, 1989

Waverly Historic District is a national historic district located at Columbia, South Carolina. The district encompasses 132 contributing buildings in the first suburban development at Columbia. They were built between about 1898 and 1925, and the district includes examples of Queen Anne, Colonial Revival, Neoclassical, shotgun, American Foursquare, and Craftsman/Bungalow style architecture. The community has evolved from a predominantly white neighborhood into a community of African-American artisans, professionals and social reformers. [2] [3]

Columbia, South Carolina Capital of South Carolina

Columbia is the capital and second largest city of the U.S. state of South Carolina, with a population estimate of 134,309 as of 2016. The city serves as the county seat of Richland County, and a portion of the city extends into neighboring Lexington County. It is the center of the Columbia metropolitan statistical area, which had a population of 767,598 as of the 2010 United States Census, growing to 817,488 by July 1, 2016, according to 2015 U.S. Census estimates. The name Columbia is a poetic term used for the United States, originating from the name of Christopher Columbus.

Colonial Revival architecture

Colonial Revival architecture was and is a nationalistic design movement in the United States and Canada. Part of a broader Colonial Revival Movement embracing Georgian and Neoclassical styles, it seeks to revive elements of architectural style, garden design, and interior design of American colonial architecture.

Neoclassical architecture is an architectural style produced by the neoclassical movement that began in the mid-18th century. In its purest form, it is a style principally derived from the architecture of classical antiquity, the Vitruvian principles, and the work of the Italian architect Andrea Palladio.

It was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1989. [1]

National Register of Historic Places federal list of historic sites in the United States

The National Register of Historic Places (NRHP) is the United States federal government's official list of districts, sites, buildings, structures, and objects deemed worthy of preservation for their historical significance. A property listed in the National Register, or located within a National Register Historic District, may qualify for tax incentives derived from the total value of expenses incurred preserving the property.

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Debruhl-Marshall House

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North Carolina Mutual Building

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A.P. Williams Funeral Home

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Good Samaritan-Waverly Hospital

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Bellevue Historic District (Columbia, South Carolina)

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West Gervais Street Historic District

West Gervais Street Historic District is a national historic district located at Columbia, South Carolina. The district encompasses 40 contributing buildings in a commercial, warehouse, and light industrial section of Columbia. They date from about 1846 to the 1930s. Notable buildings include the W. H. Gibbes Machinery Co. and Carriage Works, Seaboard Air Line Railroad Passenger Depot, and Seaboard Air Line Railroad Baggage Room.

Granby Mill Village Historic District

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Columbia Historic District I

Columbia Historic District I is a national historic district located in the Arsenal Hill neighborhood at Columbia, South Carolina. The district encompasses nine contributing buildings and includes a complex of fine mansions and attractive homes built before the American Civil War. The buildings are in the Greek Revival, Italianate, Classical Revival, and the “Columbia Cottage” styles. They include the Governor's Mansion, Caldwell-Hampton-Boylston House, Lace House, and Palmetto Iron Works and Armory.

Columbia Historic District II

Columbia Historic District II is a national historic district located at Columbia, South Carolina. The district encompasses 113 contributing buildings and 1 contributing site in a former residential section of Columbia. They were built between the early-19th century and the 1930s and are now mostly used for commercial purposes. The buildings are in the Greek Revival, Gothic Revival, Classical Revival, and the “Columbia Cottage” styles. Notable buildings include the Robert Mills House, Debruhl-Marshall House, Hampton-Preston House, Episcopal Church of the Good Shepherd, Crawford-Clarkson House, Maxcy Gregg House, Hale-Elmore-Seibels House, St. Paul's Lutheran Church, and Ebenezer Lutheran Church.

South Street–South Church Street Historic District national historic district located at Union, Union County, South Carolina

South Street–South Church Street Historic District is a national historic district located at Union, Union County, South Carolina. The district encompasses 78 contributing buildings in a primarily residential section of Union. The houses were built between about 1850 to about 1930, with the majority dating from about 1850 to about 1915. The district includes many large-frame Queen Anne inspired houses built about 1880-1910. Also in the district are Neo-Classical, Gothic Revival, Colonial Revival, Tudor Revival, American Foursquare, and Bungalow style dwellings. The district includes the first Carnegie Library established in South Carolina.

West End Commercial Historic District (Greenville, South Carolina)

West End Commercial Historic District is a national historic district located at Greenville, South Carolina. It encompasses 15 contributing buildings in Greenville's second "downtown." The commercial buildings primarily date from about 1880 to 1920, and include examples of Victorian commercial architecture. Notable buildings include the American Bank, Alliance and Mills & McBayer Cotton Warehouses, Indian River Fruit Store, Pete's Place, Bacot's West End Drug Store/Stringer's Drug, Furman Lunch, and Greer Thompson Building.

The Waverly

The Waverly, also known as the Anderson Boarding House, is a historic hotel building located at Hendersonville, Henderson County, North Carolina. It was built about 1898, and is a three-story, Queen Anne style frame building. It features a two-tiered sawnwork-trimmed porch and widow's walk. The building was expanded to three stories following a fire about 1910. A one-story frame wing was added about 1940.

References

  1. 1 2 National Park Service (2010-07-09). "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places . National Park Service.
  2. Mary R. Parramore and Frank Brown, III (April 1989). "Waverly Historic District" (pdf). National Register of Historic Places - Nomination and Inventory. Retrieved 2014-01-07.
  3. "Waverly Historic District, Richland County (Columbia)". National Register Properties in South Carolina. South Carolina Department of Archives and History. Retrieved 2014-01-07. and accompanying map