Waves (hairstyle)

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360 wave process hair waves 360 wave process hair waves.jpg
360 wave process hair waves

Waves are a hairstyle for curly hair in which the curls are brushed and/or combed and flattened out, creating a ripple-like pattern.

The hairstyle begins with a short-cropped haircut and frequent brushing and/or combing of the curls, which trains the curls to flatten out. Pomades and moisturizers can help hold the hair in place while preventing the hair from getting too dry. [1] [2] A do-rag is worn to preserve moisture while compressing the hair and holding it in place. [3] [4] [5]

Pomade Cosmetic used for the hair

Pomade is a greasy, waxy, or a water-based substance that is used to style hair. Pomade generally gives the user's hair a shiny and slick appearance. It lasts longer than most hair care products, often requiring multiple washes to completely remove. The original pomade of the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries consisted mainly of bear fat or lard. Lanolin, beeswax, and petroleum jelly have been used extensively in the manufacture of modern pomades. Stiffening properties of pomades make sculptured hairstyles such as the pompadour possible; while long lasting moisturizing properties make it popular with individuals with Afro-textured hair.

Do-rag Type of mens headscarf to maintain hair positioning

A durag or do-rag is a scarf unusually worn on the head after a hair treatment process (hairdo).

In the early 20th century, as many African-American men sought to style their hair with texture-altering products, "cold soap" waves became a popular hairstyle. Men produced waves by washing their hair with soap but not rinsing all of it out before putting on their do-rags. [6]

African-American hair and African-American hairstyles are the diverse ways that African-American men and women style their hair. Because many black people have hair with tighter and smaller curls than people of other races, unique hair styles have developed. In addition to many black hairstyles have historical connections to African cultures.

Related Research Articles

Hairstyle style of hair, usually on the human scalp

A hairstyle, hairdo, or haircut refers to the styling of hair, usually on the human scalp. Sometimes, this could also mean an editing of facial or body hair. The fashioning of hair can be considered an aspect of personal grooming, fashion, and cosmetics, although practical, cultural, and popular considerations also influence some hairstyles.

Finger wave

A finger wave is a method of setting hair into waves (curls) that was popular in the 1920s and 1930s and again in the late 1990s in North America and Europe. Silver screen actresses such as Bette Davis and Anita Page are credited with the original popularity of finger waves. In their return in the 1990s, the style was popularized by pop stars like Madonna, and Hip Hop stars of the time, such as Missy Elliott. The popularity of finger waves in the 1990s was aided by a movement toward shorter, more natural hair in the African-American community.

Afro hairstyle

Afro, sometimes abbreviated to 'fro, is a hairstyle worn naturally outward by people with lengthy or even medium length kinky hair texture, or specifically styled in such a fashion by individuals with naturally curly or straight hair. The hairstyle is created by combing the hair away from the scalp, allowing the hair to extend out from the head in a large, rounded shape, much like a cloud or ball.

Hair mousse

Hair mousse, also referred to as styling foam, is a hairstyling product to protect, stiffen, or style hair. "Mousse" originates from a French term meaning foam. Hair mousse originated in France and was brought to the North American retail market by L'Oreal in the 1980s, the first mousse product coming out under the label "Valence". It is often dispensed in an aerosol foam spray or in cream form. Hair mousse adds volume to hair and often provides both conditioning and hold, without any clumps or build-up. It is a hairstyling product which works by using synthetic resins to coat the hairs, to assist the hair in taking a certain shape. Hair mousse is purple while in the can and turns an off-white color upon coming in contact with the air. One of the lighter-weight hair styling products, hair mousse is applied to wet hair before drying and styling. Hair mousse can be used on naturally curly or permed hair to reduce frizz and define curl.

Hair iron

A hair iron or hair tong is a tool used to change the structure of the hair using heat. There are three general kinds: curling irons, used to make the hair curly, straightening irons, commonly called straighteners or flat irons, used to straighten the hair, and crimping irons, used to create crimps of the desired size in the hair.

Ducktail

The ducktail is a men's haircut style popular during the 1950s. It is also called the duck's tail, duck's ass, duck's arse (UK), or simply D.A., and is also described as slicked back hair. The hair is pomaded (greased), combed back around the sides, and parted centrally down the back of the head.

Bouffant type of hairstyle

A bouffant is a type of hairstyle characterized by hair raised high on the head and usually covering the ears or hanging down on the sides.

Conk

The conk was a hairstyle popular among African-American men from the 1920s to the 1960s. This hairstyle called for a man with naturally "kinky" hair to have it chemically straightened using a relaxer, so that the newly straightened hair could be styled in specific ways. Often, the relaxer was made at home, by mixing lye, eggs, and potatoes, the applier having to wear gloves and the receiver's head having to be rinsed thoroughly after application to avoid chemical burns.

Afro-textured hair A hair texture

Afro-textured hair is the natural hair texture of certain populations in Africa, the African diaspora, Oceania and in some parts of South and Southeast Asia. Each strand of this hair type grows in a tiny, angle-like helix shape. The overall effect is such that, compared to straight, wavy or curly hair, afro-textured hair appears denser.

Hair straightening

Hair straightening is a hair styling technique used since the 1890s involving the flattening and straightening of hair in order to give it a smooth, streamlined, and sleek appearance. It became very popular during the 1950s among black males and females of all races. It is accomplished using a hair iron or hot comb, chemical relaxers, Japanese hair straightening, Brazilian hair straightening, or roller set/blowdryer styling. In addition, some shampoos, conditioners, and hair gels can help to make hair temporarily straight.

Hair roller small tube that is rolled into a persons hair in order to curl it

A hair roller or hair curler is a small tube that is rolled into a person's hair in order to curl it, or to straighten curly hair, making a new hairstyle.

Hairstyle products are used to change the texture and/or shape of hair, or to hold a hairstyle in place.

Roman hairstyles

Hairstyle fashion in Rome was ever changing, and particularly in the Roman Imperial Period there were a number of different ways to style hair. As with clothes, there were several hairstyles that were limited to certain people in ancient society. Styles are so distinctive they allow scholars today to create a chronology of Roman portraiture and art; we are able to date pictures of the empresses on coins, or identify busts depending on their hairstyles.

Jheri curl hairstyle

The Jheri curl is a permanent wave hairstyle that was popular among African Americans during the 1980s. Invented by the hairdresser Jheri Redding, the Jheri curl gives the wearer a glossy, loosely curled look. It was touted as a "wash and wear" style that was easier to care for than the other popular chemical treatment of the day, the relaxer.

The undercut is a hairstyle that was fashionable from the 1910s to the 1940s, predominantly among men, and saw a steadily growing revival in the 1980s before becoming fully fashionable again in the 2010s. Typically, the hair on the top of the head is long and parted on either the side or center, while the back and sides are buzzed very short. It is closely related to the curtained hair of the mid-to-late 1990s, although those with undercuts during the 2010s tend to slick back the bangs away from the face.

<i>360 Waves</i> (album) 2013 studio album by Durag Dynasty

360 Waves is the debut album by American Hip-hop trio Durag Dynasty. The group worked on the album with hip-hop producer The Alchemist, who produced it entirely. The album was released on March 26, 2013, by Nature Sounds.

The natural hair movement is a movement which encourages women of African descent to keep their natural afro-textured hair. It originated in the United States during the 2000s.

Curly Girl Method

The Curly Girl Method is an approach to hair care designed for naturally curly hair that has not been chemically relaxed. It is similar to the "no poo" method in that it discourages the use of shampoo. Among other things, it calls for the use of a cleansing conditioner in place of shampoo, no silicones, the use of a diffuser when blowdrying, and no combs, brushes, or terrycloth towels. It also includes tips for using hair gel and other styling products. The aim in general is to treat naturally curly hair gently, minimizing damage to the hair cuticle; to keep it moisturized, since curly hair is more prone to dryness than straight hair; and, perhaps most significantly, to accentuate rather than interfere with the hair's natural curl pattern.

References

  1. Gibbson, Alexander-Julian (2018-05-25). "How to Get Waves". GQ. Retrieved 2018-05-30.
  2. Garcia, Sandra E. (2018-05-14). "The Durag, Explained". The New York Times. Retrieved 2018-05-30.
  3. Dawson, Lamar (2018-04-06). "How to Tie a Durag, According to A$AP Ferg". GQ. Retrieved 2018-05-30.
  4. 360 Waves, How to Get (2011-02-03). "How to Get 360 Waves". How to Get 360 Waves. Retrieved 2019-05-23.
  5. .org, 360 Waves (2011-02-03). "360Waves.org". 360Waves.org. Retrieved 2019-05-23.
  6. Byrd, Ayana D.; Tharps, Lori L. (2014). Hair Story: Untangling the Roots of Black Hair in America (2 ed.). New York: St. Martin's Press. p. 29. ISBN   9781466872103.