William Barlow (bishop of Lincoln)

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William Barlow
Bishop of Lincoln
Church Church of England
Diocese Diocese of Lincoln
Elected1608
Term ended1613
Predecessor William Chaderton
Successor Richard Neile
Other post(s) Bishop of Rochester
1605–1608
Dean of Chester
Personal details
Died1613
Buried Buckden Palace
Denomination Anglican
Profession Scholar
Alma mater St John's College, Cambridge

William Barlow (died 1613) was an Anglican priest and courtier during the reign of James I of England. He served as Bishop of Rochester in 1605 and Bishop of Lincoln in the Church of England from 1608 until his death. He had also served the church as Rector of St Dunstan's, Stepney in Middlesex and of Orpington, in Kent. He was also Dean of Chester Cathedral, and secured prebends in Chiswick and Westminster.

Contents

Career

As a trusted member of the court, he was appointed to the directorship of the "Second Westminster Company" charged by James with translating the New Testament epistles for the King James Version of the Bible. He participated in the early planning for the translation, and had supported the scholarship of linguist Edward Lively, among other contributions to the project.

Barlow's scholarly career had begun at St John's College, Cambridge, where he had graduated in 1584, earned a Master of Arts in 1587, and was admitted as a Fellow in 1590. [1] His publications showed his talents both for scholarship and preferment.

Death

Barlow was buried at St Mary's Church, Buckden, Huntingdonshire. His wife's name is unknown but his daughter and co-heir, Alice, married Sir Henry Yelverton, Knt. [2]

See also

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References

  1. "Barlow, William (BRLW580W)". A Cambridge Alumni Database. University of Cambridge.
  2. The Extinct and Dormant Baronetcies of England, Ireland, and Scotland, by Messrs., John & John Bernard Burke, 2nd edition, London, 1841, p.594.
Church of England titles
Preceded by Bishop of Rochester
1605–1608
Succeeded by
Preceded by Bishop of Lincoln
1608–1613
Succeeded by