Zugazaea

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Zugazaea
Scientific classification
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Zugazaea

Korf, Iturr. & Lizoň (1998)
Type species
Zugazaea agyrioides
Korf, Iturr. & Lizoň (1998)

Zugazaea is a fungal genus in the order Helotiales. The relationship of this taxon to other taxa within the order is unknown ( incertae sedis ), and it has not yet been placed with certainty into any family. [1] This is a monotypic genus, containing the single species Zugazaea agyrioides, found growing on decomposing wood in the Canary Islands. The fungus produces small, dull orange fruitbodies that seem to be embedded in a resinous or mulicaginous material. The type species is named for its resemblance to some members of the genus Agyrium . [2]

A genus is a taxonomic rank used in the biological classification of living and fossil organisms, as well as viruses, in biology. In the hierarchy of biological classification, genus comes above species and below family. In binomial nomenclature, the genus name forms the first part of the binomial species name for each species within the genus.

Helotiales order of fungi

Helotiales is an order of the class Leotiomycetes within the division Ascomycota. According to a 2008 estimate, the order contains 10 families, 501 genera, and 3881 species.

Taxon Group of one or more populations of an organism or organisms which have distinguishing characteristics in common

In biology, a taxon is a group of one or more populations of an organism or organisms seen by taxonomists to form a unit. Although neither is required, a taxon is usually known by a particular name and given a particular ranking, especially if and when it is accepted or becomes established. It is not uncommon, however, for taxonomists to remain at odds over what belongs to a taxon and the criteria used for inclusion. If a taxon is given a formal scientific name, its use is then governed by one of the nomenclature codes specifying which scientific name is correct for a particular grouping.

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References

  1. Lumbsch TH, Huhndorf SM (December 2007). "Outline of Ascomycota – 2007". Myconet. Chicago, USA: The Field Museum, Department of Botany. 13: 1–58. Archived from the original on March 18, 2009.
  2. Iturriaga T, Korf RP, Lizon P (1998). "Zugazaea agyrioides, an odd genus and species from Macronesia". Mycologia. 90 (4): 697–700. doi:10.2307/3761228.