1830 United States elections

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1830 United States elections
Midterm elections
Incumbent president Andrew Jackson (Democratic)
Next Congress 22nd
Senate elections
Overall controlDemocratic hold
Seats contested16 of 48 seats [1]
Net seat changeDemocratic +1 [2]
House elections
Overall controlDemocratic hold
Seats contestedAll 213 voting seats
Net seat changeAnti-Masonic +12 [2]
House022ElectionsMap.png
1830 House of Representatives election results

  Democratic seat
  Anti-Jacksonian seat

  Anti-Masonic seat

The 1830 United States elections occurred in the middle of Democratic President Andrew Jackson's first term, during the Second Party System. Members of the 22nd United States Congress were chosen in this election. The election saw Jackson's Democrats retain control of both chambers of Congress over the National Republicans and other members of the anti-Jackson faction, while the Nullifier Party won seats in Congress for the first time.

In the House, both major parties lost seats to the Anti-Masonic Party, but Democrats retained a commanding majority. [3]

In the Senate, both parties lost one seat to the Nullifiers, leaving the Democrats with half of the seats in the Senate. [4] No party had a clear majority because Vice President John C. Calhoun aligned with the Nullifiers, and eventually resigned before the end of the 22nd Congress. However, Democrats retained control of the chamber, electing three different President pro tempores: Samuel Smith, Littleton W. Tazewell, and Hugh Lawson White.

See also

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References

  1. Not counting special elections.
  2. 1 2 Congressional seat gain figures only reflect the results of the regularly-scheduled elections, and do not take special elections into account.
  3. "Party Divisions of the House of Representatives". United States House of Representatives. Retrieved 25 June 2014.
  4. "Party Division in the Senate, 1789-Present". United States Senate. Retrieved 25 June 2014.