Air Force Falcons football

Last updated
Air Force Falcons football
AmericanFootball current event.svg 2020 Air Force Falcons football team
Air Force Falcons logo.svg
First season 1955
Athletic directorNathan Pine
Head coach Troy Calhoun
14th season, 101–72 (.584)
Stadium Falcon Stadium
(Capacity: 46,692)
Field surfaceTurf
Location Colorado Springs, Colorado
Conference Mountain West
DivisionMountain
All-time record40833613 (.548)
Bowl record13131 (.500)
Conference titles3
Rivalries Army (rivalry)
Navy (rivalry)
Colorado State (rivalry)
Consensus All-Americans5
Current uniform
Air force falcons football unif.png
ColorsBlue and Silver [1]
         
Fight song"Falcon Fight Song"
(unofficial: "The U.S. Air Force")
Mascot The Bird
Marching bandUnited States Air Force Academy Drum & Bugle Corp "The Flight of Sound"
Outfitter Nike
Website GoAirForceFalcons.com

The Air Force Falcons football program represents the United States Air Force Academy in college football at the NCAA Division I Football Bowl Subdivision (formerly Division I-A) level. Air Force has been a member of the Mountain West Conference since its founding in 1999. The Falcons play their home games at Falcon Stadium in Colorado Springs, Colorado. Troy Calhoun has been the team's head coach since 2007.

Contents

The three major service academies—Air Force, Army, and Navy—compete for the Commander-in-Chief's Trophy, which is awarded to the academy that defeats the others in football that year (or retained by the previous winner in the event of a three-way tie).

History

Running back Asher Clark and the Falcons take on the Houston Cougars during the 2009 Armed Forces Bowl Falcons on offense at 2009 Armed Forces Bowl 2.JPG
Running back Asher Clark and the Falcons take on the Houston Cougars during the 2009 Armed Forces Bowl

The Falcons are not only recognized by the lightning bolt on the side of their helmets, but their traditional option attack. Air Force is one of the premier rushing teams in the nation. Since Fisher DeBerry took over as Falcons head coach in 1984, they have ranked among the nation's top 10 in rushing 19 times in 21 years. The Air Force football team has enjoyed success not only on the field but also in the classroom. In 49 years of Air Force football, there have been 39 Academic All-Americans. [2] [ dead link ]

The 1985 season

1985 was the most successful season in Air Force football history. Under second-year coach Fisher DeBerry, the Falcons came within one win of playing for the national championship. They recorded 10 straight wins to start the season, climbed the polls to No. 2 in the nation, but lost to BYU 28–21 in the penultimate game of the regular season. Air Force rebounded with a bowl game win over Texas in the Bluebonnet Bowl and finished with a 12–1 record as the No. 5 ranked team in the nation.

Conference affiliations

Air Force has been affiliated with the following conferences.

Championships

Presentation of the 2016 Commander in Chief's Trophy to the Air Force Falcons 2017 Commander in Chief's Trophy presentation 1.jpg
Presentation of the 2016 Commander in Chief's Trophy to the Air Force Falcons

Conference championships

YearConferenceCoachOverall RecordConference Record
1985 Western Athletic Conference Fisher DeBerry 12–17–1
1995Western Athletic ConferenceFisher DeBerry8–56–2
1998 Western Athletic ConferenceFisher DeBerry12–17–1

† Co-champions

Division championships

YearDivisionCoachOpponentCG result
1998 Western Athletic Conference - Mountain Fisher DeBerry BYU W 20–13
2015 Mountain West Conference - Mountain Troy Calhoun San Diego State L 24–27

Bowl games

Air Force has played in 27 bowl games in their history, with a 13–13–1 (.500) record. [3] Their highest finish in the polls was fifth (UPI coaches) in 1985. [4]

SeasonBowlOpponentResultHead coachRecord
1958 Cotton TCU T 0–0 Ben Martin 9–0–2
1963 Gator North Carolina L 0–35Ben Martin7–4
1970 Sugar Tennessee L 13–34Ben Martin9–3
1982 Hall of Fame Vanderbilt W 36–28 Ken Hatfield 8–5
1983 Independence Ole Miss W 9–3Ken Hatfield10–2
1984 Independence Virginia Tech W 23–7 Fisher DeBerry 8–4
1985 Bluebonnet Texas W 24–16Fisher DeBerry12–1
1987 Freedom Arizona State L 28–33Fisher DeBerry9–4
1989 Liberty Ole Miss L 29–42Fisher DeBerry8–4–1
1990 Liberty Ohio State W 23–11Fisher DeBerry7–5
1991 Liberty Mississippi State W 31–15Fisher DeBerry10–3
1992 Liberty Ole Miss L 0–13Fisher DeBerry7–5
1995 Copper Texas Tech L 41–55Fisher DeBerry8–5
1997 Las Vegas Oregon L 13–41Fisher DeBerry10–3
1998 Oahu Washington W 43–25Fisher DeBerry12–1
2000 Silicon Valley Fresno State W 37–34Fisher DeBerry9–3
2002 San Francisco Virginia Tech L 13–20Fisher DeBerry8–5
2007 Armed Forces California L 36–42 Troy Calhoun 9–4
2008 Armed Forces Houston L 28–34Troy Calhoun8–5
2009 Armed Forces Houston W 47–20Troy Calhoun8–5
2010 Independence Georgia Tech W 14–7Troy Calhoun9–4
2011 Military Toledo L 41–42Troy Calhoun7–6
2012 Armed Forces Rice L 14–33Troy Calhoun6–7
2014 Idaho Potato Western Michigan W 38–24Troy Calhoun10–3
2015 Armed Forces California L 36–55Troy Calhoun8–6
2016 Arizona South Alabama W 45–21Troy Calhoun10–3
2019 Cheez-It Washington State W 31–21Troy Calhoun11–2

Head coaches

Head coach Troy Calhoun (left) leads the Falcons, which he has since the 2007 season 130921-F-ZJ145-119 (9918764306).jpg
Head coach Troy Calhoun (left) leads the Falcons, which he has since the 2007 season

In over 60 years of play in college football, the Falcons have had seven head coaches.

TenureCoachRecordPct.
1955 Robert V. Whitlow 4–4.500
1956–1957 Buck Shaw 9–8–2.526
1958–1977 Ben Martin 96–103–9.483
1978 Bill Parcells 3–8.273
1979–1983 Ken Hatfield 26–32–1.449
1984–2006 Fisher DeBerry 169–107–1.612
2007–present Troy Calhoun 101–72.584

Falcon Stadium

Home games are played in Falcon Stadium, which sits below the main campus at an elevation of 6,621 feet (2,018 m) above sea level. Pre-game activities include flyovers by USAF aircraft, including the F-15 and B-2. Opened in 1962, its highest attendance was 56,409 in 2002, when the Falcons hosted Notre Dame. [5] [ dead link ]

Players

Individual accomplishments

Notable individual records

Alumni in the National Football League

All-Americans

YearPlayerPositionAward(s)
1956Larry ThomsonFBLittle America (3rd)
1958Brock StromOLConsensus
Robert BrickeyHBHelms
1963Terry IsaacsonQBHelms
Joe RodwellCHelms
1966Neal StarkeyDBPlayboy Magazine All-American
1967Neal StarkeyDBAssociated Press (3rd)
1969 Ernie Jennings WRCentral Press (2nd)
1970Ernie JenningsWRConsensus
1971Orderia MitchellCBlack Sports
Gene OgilvieDEUPI (3rd)
1972Orderia MitchellCAssociated Press (2nd), Gridiron (2nd)
Gene OgilvieDEUPI (2nd)
1973Steve HeilROVAssociated Press (3rd)
1974Dave LawsonLB/KFootball Writers
1975Dave LawsonLB/KUPI (2nd), Football News (2nd)
1981Johnny JacksonDBAssociated Press (2nd)
1982Dave SchreckOGAssociated Press (2nd)
1983John KershnerFBFootball News (2nd)
Mike KirbyWRSporting News (2nd)
1985Mark SimonPScripps Howard, Associated Press (2nd)
Scott ThomasDBWalter Camp, Kodak, Football Writes, Associated Press (2nd)
1986Terry MakiLBKodak, Football News (2nd), Associated Press (3rd)
Tom RotelloDBFootball News (2nd)
1987 Chad Hennings DTConsensus, Walter Camp, Kodak, Football Writers, Associated Press, UPI, Scripps Howard, Sporting News, Football News, Outland Trophy winner
1989 Dee Dowis QB Heisman Trophy finalist
Ron GrayKRAssociated Press (3rd)
1991Jason ChristPAssociated Press (2nd), Football News (3rd)
1992Carlton McDonaldDBConsensus, Walter Camp, Kodak, Football Writers, Associated Press, UPI, Scripps Howard, Sporting News
1993Chris MacInnisP/KUPI, Associated Press (2nd)
1996 Beau Morgan QBAssociated Press (3rd)
1998 Chris Gizzi LBAssociated Press (3rd), Football Writers (2nd)
1998Tim CurryDBSporting News (3rd)
Frank MindrupOLAmerican Football Foundation (3rd)
2001 Anthony Schlegel ILBSporting News (Freshmen 3rd team)
2002Brett HuyserOLSporting News (4th)
2007 Chad Hall WRRivals (3rd), Sports Illustrated
Carson BirdCBSports Illustrated
2008Ryan HarrisonKCollege Football News
2010Reggie RembertDBAFCA (1st), [6] Associated Press (3rd)

Academic All-Americans

Air Force Academy Falcons free safety Bobby Giannini (#11) prepares to finish off Tennessee tailback Montario Hardesty, while Falcons defensive end Josh Clayton (#97) loosens Hardesty's grip on the football. The Falcons lost 31-30 in 2006. Volunteers on offense at AFA at Tennessee 2006-09-09.JPG
Air Force Academy Falcons free safety Bobby Giannini (#11) prepares to finish off Tennessee tailback Montario Hardesty, while Falcons defensive end Josh Clayton (#97) loosens Hardesty's grip on the football. The Falcons lost 31–30 in 2006.

Academic All-Americans at Air Force. [7] [ dead link ]

YearPlayerPosition
1958Brock StromOT
1959Rich MayoQB
1960Rich MayoQB
Don BaucomHB
1967Ken ZagzebskiMG
Carl JanssenOE
1969 Ernie Jennings WR
1970Ernie JenningsWR
Bob ParkerQB
Phil BaumanLB
1971Darryl HaasLB/P
Bob HomburgDE
John GriffithDT
1972Gene OgilvieDE
Bob HomburgDE
Mark PrillMG
1973Joe DebesOT
1976Steve HoogWR
1977Mack McCollumROV
1978Steve HoogWR
Tom FoertschLB
Tim FydaDE
1981Mike FranceLB
Kevin EwingROV
1982Jeff KubiakP
1983Jeff KubiakP
1987 Chad Hennings DT
Scott SalmonDB
James HeckerDB
1988Scott SalmonDB
David HlatkyOL
James HeckerDB
1989Chris HowardHB
1990Chris HowardHB
J.T. TokishLB
1992Grant JohnsonLB
1996Dustin TynerWR
Rashad PentonDB
1997Rashad PentonDB
1998Rashad PentonDB
2003Ryan CarterDE
2004Ryan CarterDE
2018Garrett KauppilaDB

Future non-conference opponents

Announced schedules as of February 3, 2020. [8]

20212022202320242025202620272028
Lafayette Colorado at Wake Forest Navy at Navy Navy at Navy Navy
Florida Atlantic Navy at Navy at Army Army at Army Army at Army
at Navy at Army Army
Army Northern Iowa

Rivals

Commander-in-Chief's Trophy

Air Force has a traditional rivalry against the other two FBS service academies, Army and Navy; the three play for the right to hold the Commander-in-Chief's Trophy. Air Force has won the trophy 20 times, more than either Army or Navy.

Colorado State

Among other schools, Air Force has played more games against Colorado State and Wyoming, having played each school 58 times since 1957, the Falcons' first season.

Since 1980, the Falcons and Colorado State Rams have competed for the Ram–Falcon Trophy. Air Force holds a 25–15 advantage over Colorado State in games that the trophy has been contested in.

Colorado

In 2019 Air Force renewed a rivalry with Colorado, winning at Folsom Field on Sept. 14 by a score of 30–23. [9] The teams had not played since Oct. 5, 1974, a game that Colorado won by a score of 28–27. [10] Air Force won the first meeting between the teams in 1958. The 1963 game between the two college football teams was postponed due to the assassination of President John F. Kennedy. The 1973 game, the last one played in Boulder before the 2019 clash, was marred by a riot. [11] Fans threw eggs and beer at Air Force personnel and cadets. [12]

Top 10 rivals

Below are Air Force's record against its top ten most-played opponents since 1957. [13]

OpponentGamesWinsLossesTiesPct.Last Meeting
Colorado State5836211.629Nov 16, 2019 (W 38–21)
Wyoming5829263.526Nov 30, 2019 (W 20–6)
Army5537171.682Dec 19, 2020 (L 7–10)
Navy5331220.585Oct 3, 2020 (W 40–7)
New Mexico3824140.632Nov 20, 2020 (W 28–0)
San Diego State3619170.528Oct 12, 2018 (L 17–21)
BYU317240.226Sep 11, 2010 (W 35–14)
Notre Dame306240.200Oct 26, 2013 (L 10–45)
Utah2714130.519Oct 30, 2010 (L 23–28)
UNLV221660.727Oct 19, 2018 (W 41–35)
Hawaii221471.659Oct 19, 2019 (W 56–26)

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1985 Air Force Falcons football team American college football season

The 1985 Air Force Falcons football team represented the United States Air Force Academy in the 1985 NCAA Division I-A football season. The Falcons came within one victory of playing for the national championship. After beating the Texas Longhorns in the Bluebonnet Bowl, the Falcons ended the year 12–1 and ranked #5 in the country.

1989 Air Force Falcons football team American college football season

The 1989 Air Force Falcons football team represented the United States Air Force Academy in the 1989 NCAA Division I-A football season. In the Ram–Falcon Trophy match, the Falcons beat the Colorado State Rams to win the trophy.

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1987 Air Force Falcons football team American college football season

The 1987 Air Force Falcons football team represented the United States Air Force Academy in the 1987 NCAA Division I-A football season. The Falcons offense scored 405 points while the defense allowed 269 points. At season's end, the Falcons appeared in the 1987 Freedom Bowl. In the Ram–Falcon Trophy match, the Falcons beat the Colorado State Rams to win the trophy. Air Force also won the Commander-in-Chief's Trophy, emblematic of beating both Army and Navy.

1991 Air Force Falcons football team American college football season

The 1991 Air Force Falcons football team represented the United States Air Force Academy in the 1991 NCAA Division I-A football season. In the Ram–Falcon Trophy match, the Falcons beat the Colorado State Rams to win the trophy.

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References

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  4. 2013 Air Force football media guide. Retrieved 2013-Sep-25.
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  6. Mayer, Larry (2013-05-12). "Tryout players followed unusual path to minicamp". Chicago Bears. Archived from the original on 2016-10-21. Retrieved 2013-05-13.
  7. http://www.airforcesports.com/ViewArticle.dbml?DB_OEM_ID=3000&KEY=&ATCLID=157958&SPID=804&SPSID=22383
  8. "Air Force Falcons Football Future Schedules". FBSchedules.com. Retrieved February 3, 2020.
  9. "Remsberg scores in OT, Air Force beats Colorado 30-23" . Retrieved 31 December 2019.
  10. "Why renewal of CU Buffs-Air Force football game "should've been done a long time ago"". denverpost.com. Retrieved 31 December 2019.
  11. "Why renewal of CU Buffs-Air Force football game "should've been done a long time ago"". denverpost.com. Retrieved 31 December 2019.
  12. Howell, Brian. "CU football: Buffs renew old rivalry with Air Force". dailycamera.com. Retrieved 31 December 2019.
  13. "Air Force Falcons Head-to-Head Results". Sports-Reference.com. Retrieved 30 Nov 2019.