Athletics at the 1928 Summer Olympics – Women's 100 metres

Last updated
Women's 100 metres
at the Games of the IX Olympiad
Venue Olympic Stadium
DateJuly 30 (heats & semifinals)
July 31 (final)
Winning time12.2
Medalists
Gold medal icon.svg Betty Robinson US flag 48 stars.svg  United States
Silver medal icon.svg Bobbie Rosenfeld Canadian Red Ensign (1921-1957).svg  Canada
Bronze medal icon.svg Ethel Smith Canadian Red Ensign (1921-1957).svg  Canada
1932  

The women's 100 metres event at the 1928 Olympic Games took place between July 30 & July 31. [1]

Contents

Results

Heats

Heat 1

RankAthleteNationTimeNotes
1 Anni Holdmann Flag of Germany (3-2 aspect ratio).svg  Germany 13.0Q
2 Edie Robinson Flag of Australia.svg  Australia UnknownQ
3 Derna Polazzo Flag of Italy (1861-1946).svg  Italy Unknown

Heat 2

RankAthleteNationTimeNotes
1 Erna Steinberg Flag of Germany (3-2 aspect ratio).svg  Germany 12.8Q
2 Mary Washburn US flag 48 stars.svg  United States 12.8Q
3 Nettie Grooss Flag of the Netherlands.svg  Netherlands 12.8
4 Ruth Svedberg Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden Unknown

Heat 3

RankAthleteNationTimeNotes
1 Kinue Hitomi Flag of Japan (1870-1999).svg  Japan 12.8Q
2 Jane Bell Canadian Red Ensign (1921-1957).svg  Canada 13.0Q
3 Anne Vrana-O'Brien US flag 48 stars.svg  United States 13.1
4 Matilde Moraschi Flag of Italy (1861-1946).svg  Italy 13.6

Heat 4

RankAthleteNationTimeNotes
1 Leni Junker Flag of Germany (3-2 aspect ratio).svg  Germany 12.8Q
2 Elta Cartwright US flag 48 stars.svg  United States UnknownQ
3 Yolande Plancke Flag of France.svg  France Unknown

Heat 5

RankAthleteNationTimeNotes
1 Georgette Gagneux Flag of France.svg  France 13.0Q
2 Maud Sundberg Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden UnknownQ
3 Luigia Bonfanti Flag of Italy (1861-1946).svg  Italy Unknown

Heat 6

RankAthleteNationTimeNotes
1 Leni Schmidt Flag of Germany (3-2 aspect ratio).svg  Germany 12.8Q
2 Marjorie Clark Red Ensign of South Africa (1912-1928).svg  South Africa 13.0Q
3 Rie Briejèr Flag of the Netherlands.svg  Netherlands 13.1
4 Lucienne Velu Flag of France.svg  France 13.5

Heat 7

RankAthleteNationTimeNotes
1 Bobbie Rosenfeld Canadian Red Ensign (1921-1957).svg  Canada 12.6Q
2 Betty Robinson US flag 48 stars.svg  United States UnknownQ
3 Lies Aengenendt Flag of the Netherlands.svg  Netherlands 13.0

Heat 8

RankAthleteNationTimeNotes
1 Myrtle Cook Canadian Red Ensign (1921-1957).svg  Canada 12.8Q
2 Norma Wilson Flag of New Zealand.svg  New Zealand 13.0Q
3 Bets ter Horst Flag of the Netherlands.svg  Netherlands 13.0

Heat 9

RankAthleteNationTimeNotes
1 Ethel Smith Canadian Red Ensign (1921-1957).svg  Canada 12.6Q
2 Marguerite Radideau Flag of France.svg  France UnknownQ
3 Zinaida Liepiņa Flag of Latvia.svg  Latvia Unknown
4 Sidonie Verschueren Flag of Belgium (civil).svg  Belgium Unknown

Semifinals

Semifinal 1

RankAthleteNationTimeNotes
1 Bobbie Rosenfeld Canadian Red Ensign (1921-1957).svg  Canada 12.4Q, OR
2 Ethel Smith Canadian Red Ensign (1921-1957).svg  Canada UnknownQ
3 Georgette Gagneux Flag of France.svg  France Unknown
4 Anni Holdmann Flag of Germany (3-2 aspect ratio).svg  Germany Unknown
5 Mary Washburn US flag 48 stars.svg  United States Unknown
6 Marjorie Clark Red Ensign of South Africa (1912-1928).svg  South Africa Unknown

Semifinal 2

RankAthleteNationTimeNotes
1 Betty Robinson US flag 48 stars.svg  United States 12.4Q, =OR
2 Myrtle Cook Canadian Red Ensign (1921-1957).svg  Canada UnknownQ
3 Edie Robinson Flag of Australia.svg  Australia Unknown
4 Kinue Hitomi Flag of Japan (1870-1999).svg  Japan Unknown
5 Leni Junker Flag of Germany (3-2 aspect ratio).svg  Germany Unknown
6 Maud Sundberg Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden Unknown

Semifinal 3

RankAthleteNationTimeNotes
1 Leni Schmidt Flag of Germany (3-2 aspect ratio).svg  Germany 12.8Q
2 Erna Steinberg Flag of Germany (3-2 aspect ratio).svg  Germany 12.9Q
3 Jane Bell Canadian Red Ensign (1921-1957).svg  Canada Unknown
4 Elta Cartwright US flag 48 stars.svg  United States Unknown
5 Norma Wilson Flag of New Zealand.svg  New Zealand Unknown
6 Marguerite Radideau Flag of France.svg  France Unknown

Final

RankAthleteNationTimeNotes
Gold medal icon.svg Betty Robinson US flag 48 stars.svg  United States 12.2 =WR
Silver medal icon.svg Bobbie Rosenfeld Canadian Red Ensign (1921-1957).svg  Canada 12.3
Bronze medal icon.svg Ethel Smith Canadian Red Ensign (1921-1957).svg  Canada 12.3
4 Erna Steinberg Flag of Germany (3-2 aspect ratio).svg  Germany 12.4
Myrtle Cook Canadian Red Ensign (1921-1957).svg  Canada DQ
Leni Schmidt Flag of Germany (3-2 aspect ratio).svg  Germany DQ

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References

  1. "Athletics at the 1928 Amsterdam Summer Games: Women's 100 metres". Sports Reference. Archived from the original on 17 April 2020. Retrieved 4 June 2017.