United States at the 1936 Summer Olympics

Last updated

United States at the
1936 Summer Olympics
US flag 48 stars.svg
IOC code USA
NOC United States Olympic Committee
in Berlin
Competitors359 (313 men and 46 women) in 21 sports
Flag bearer Wally O'Connor
Medals
Ranked 2nd
Gold
24
Silver
20
Bronze
12
Total
56
Summer Olympics appearances (overview)
Other related appearances
1906 Intercalated Games

The United States competed at the 1936 Summer Olympics in Berlin, Germany. The Americans finished second in the medal table to the hosts. 359 competitors, 313 men and 46 women, took part in 127 events in 21 sports. [1]

Contents

Medalists

Athletics

Basketball

The men's basketball team won the gold medal. The players were as following.

Boxing

Canoeing

Football (soccer)

Results

  • U.S. 0-1 Italy

Roster

Rowing

The men's eight-man team won the gold medal. The team consisted of the following:

Women Competitors

Athletics

Swimming

Athletics

Basketball

Boxing

Canoeing

Cycling

Six cyclists represented the United States in 1936.

Individual road race
Team road race
Sprint
Time trial
Tandem
Team pursuit

Diving

Equestrian

Fencing

22 fencers represented the United States in 1936.

Men's foil
Men's team foil
Men's épée
Men's team épée
Men's sabre
Men's team sabre
Women's foil

Football

Gymnastics

16 gymnasts, 8 men and 8 women, represented the United States in 1936.

Men's team
Women's team

Handball

Hockey

Modern pentathlon

Three pentathletes represented the United States in 1936.

Rowing

The United States had 26 rowers participate in all seven rowing events in 1936. [2]

Men's single sculls
Men's double sculls
Men's coxless pair
Men's coxed pair
Men's coxless four
Men's coxed four
Men's eight

Sailing

Shooting

Six shooters represented the United States in 1936.

25 m rapid fire pistol
50 m pistol

Swimming

Water polo

Weightlifting

Wrestling

Art competitions

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References

  1. "United States at the 1936 Berlin Summer Games". sports-reference.com. Archived from the original on April 17, 2020. Retrieved June 6, 2010.
  2. Evans, Hilary; Gjerde, Arild; Heijmans, Jeroen; Mallon, Bill; et al. "United States Rowing at the 1936 Berlin Summer Games". Olympics at Sports-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Archived from the original on April 17, 2020. Retrieved March 27, 2018.