Athletics at the 1952 Summer Olympics – Men's hammer throw

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Men's hammer throw
at the Games of the XV Olympiad
Jozsef Csermak 1952.jpg
József Csermák competing
Venue Helsinki Olympic Stadium
DateJuly 24
Competitors33 from 18 nations
Winning distance60.34 WR
Medalists
Gold medal icon.svg József Csermák
Flag of Hungary (1949-1956).svg  Hungary
Silver medal icon.svg Karl Storch
Flag of Germany.svg  Germany
Bronze medal icon.svg Imre Németh
Flag of Hungary (1949-1956).svg  Hungary
  1948
1956  
Video on YouTube amateur film TV-icon-2.svg
Video on YouTube amateur film

The men's hammer throw event at the 1952 Summer Olympics took place on 24 July at the Helsinki Olympic Stadium. [1] There were 33 competitors from 18 nations. [2] The maximum number of athletes per nation had been set at 3 since the 1930 Olympic Congress. The event was won by József Csermák of Hungary, the nation's second consecutive victory in the event. Imre Németh, who had won four years earlier, took bronze; he was the fourth man to win multiple medals in the event. Silver went to Karl Storch of Germany.

Contents

Background

This was the 11th appearance of the event, which has been held at every Summer Olympics except 1896. Six of the 13 finalists from the 1948 Games returned: gold medalist Imre Németh of Hungary, silver medalist Ivan Gubijan of Yugoslavia, fourth-place finisher Samuel Felton of the United States, fifth-place finisher Lauri Tamminen of Finland, seventh-place finisher Teseo Taddia of Italy, and eleventh-place finisher Duncan Clark of Great Britain. Németh was among the favorites to repeat; other contenders included 1950 European champion Sverre Strandli of Norway and Karl Storch of Germany. [2]

Belgium, Pakistan, Puerto Rico, Romania, and the Soviet Union each made their debut in the event. The United States appeared for the 11th time, the only nation to have competed at each appearance of the event to that point.

Competition format

The competition used the two-round format introduced in 1936, with the qualifying round completely separate from the divided final. In qualifying, each athlete received three attempts; those recording a mark of at least 49.00 metres advanced to the final. If fewer than 12 athletes achieved that distance, the top 12 would advance. The results of the qualifying round were then ignored. Finalists received three throws each, with the top six competitors receiving an additional three attempts. The best distance among those six throws counted. [2] [3]

Records

Prior to the competition, the existing world and Olympic records were as follows.

World recordFlag of Hungary.svg  Imre Németh  (HUN)59.88 Budapest, Hungary 19 May 1950
Olympic recordFlag of the German Reich (1935-1945).svg  Karl Hein  (GER)56.49 Berlin, Germany 3 August 1936

József Csermák set a new Olympic record with a distance of 57.20 metres in the qualifying round. In the final, five men beat the old Olympic record and a sixth man tied it; the three medalists all bettered Csermák's qualifying round mark. Csermák's first throw in the final went 58.45 metres; his third went 60.34 metres for a new world record.

Schedule

All times are Eastern European Summer Time (UTC+3)

DateTimeRound
Thursday, 24 July 195211:30
16:45
Qualifying
Final

Results

Qualifying round

Qualification: All throwers reaching 49 metres advanced to the final, with a minimum of 12 advancing.

RankGroupAthleteNation123DistanceNotes
1A József Csermák Flag of Hungary (1949-1956).svg  Hungary 57.20 OR 57.20 OR
2A Karl Storch Flag of Germany.svg  Germany X55.3555.35
3B Sverre Strandli Flag of Norway.svg  Norway 54.9654.96
4A Ivan Gubijan Flag of SFR Yugoslavia.svg  Yugoslavia 54.7654.76
5A Karl Wolf Flag of Germany.svg  Germany 53.8653.86
6B Teseo Taddia Flag of Italy.svg  Italy 53.8553.85
7A Miloš Máca Flag of Czechoslovakia.svg  Czechoslovakia 53.7253.72
8B Heorhiy Dybenko Flag of the Soviet Union (1936-1955).svg  Soviet Union X53.7053.70
9A Jiří Dadák Flag of Czechoslovakia.svg  Czechoslovakia 53.6653.66
10A Imre Németh Flag of Hungary (1949-1956).svg  Hungary 53.5953.59
11B Mykola Redkin Flag of the Soviet Union (1936-1955).svg  Soviet Union X53.5853.58
12A Oiva Halmetoja Flag of Finland.svg  Finland 52.5552.55
13B Mikhail Krivonosov Flag of the Soviet Union (1936-1955).svg  Soviet Union X51.1551.15
14B Constantin Dumitru Flag of Romania (1948-1952).svg  Romania 50.9250.92
15A Samuel Felton US flag 48 stars.svg  United States 50.8950.89
16B Poul Cederquist Flag of Denmark.svg  Denmark 50.7750.77
17A Duncan Clark Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  Great Britain 50.6950.69
18B Peter Allday Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  Great Britain X50.5950.59
19B Reino Kuivamäki Flag of Finland.svg  Finland 47.9650.5850.58
20A Marty Engel US flag 48 stars.svg  United States X50.0050.00
21B Rudolf Galin Flag of SFR Yugoslavia.svg  Yugoslavia 49.9849.98
22B Pierre Legrain Flag of France.svg  France 49.7549.75
23B Bob Backus US flag 48 stars.svg  United States 49.3949.39
24B Henri Haest Flag of Belgium (civil).svg  Belgium 49.0849.08
25A Lauri Tamminen Flag of Finland.svg  Finland X47.7449.0549.05
26B Aivo Lucioli Flag of Italy.svg  Italy 48.74XX48.74
27A Roger Veeser Flag of Switzerland.svg  Switzerland 47.7248.60X48.60
28A Fazal Hussain Flag of Pakistan.svg  Pakistan 47.8048.3645.8248.36
29A Ewan Douglas Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  Great Britain XX48.2548.25
30A André Osterberger Flag of France.svg  France XX47.8747.87
31A Muhammad Igbal Flag of Pakistan.svg  Pakistan X47.45X47.45
32A Arturo Melcher Flag of Chile.svg  Chile X41.6745.5545.55
A Jaime Annexy Puerto rico national sport flag.svg  Puerto Rico XXXNM

Final

RankAthleteNation123456DistanceNotes
Gold medal icon.svg József Csermák Flag of Hungary (1949-1956).svg  Hungary 58.45 OR 57.2860.34 WR 49.68XX60.34 WR
Silver medal icon.svg Karl Storch Flag of Germany.svg  Germany X56.4558.1858.8657.8058.3458.86
Bronze medal icon.svg Imre Németh Flag of Hungary (1949-1956).svg  Hungary 54.9255.0556.8254.9557.7456.3057.74
4 Jiří Dadák Flag of Czechoslovakia.svg  Czechoslovakia 54.0056.81X51.7255.6154.0456.81
5 Mykola Redkin Flag of the Soviet Union (1936-1955).svg  Soviet Union 53.0856.5552.3053.55X54.1656.55
6 Karl Wolf Flag of Germany.svg  Germany 56.4954.9853.7953.60X56.4156.49
7 Sverre Strandli Flag of Norway.svg  Norway 56.3653.7755.07Did not advance56.36
8 Heorhiy Dybenko Flag of the Soviet Union (1936-1955).svg  Soviet Union 55.03X53.68Did not advance55.03
9 Ivan Gubijan Flag of SFR Yugoslavia.svg  Yugoslavia 53.5353.8254.54Did not advance54.54
10 Teseo Taddia Flag of Italy.svg  Italy XX54.27Did not advance54.27
11 Samuel Felton US flag 48 stars.svg  United States 53.10X53.32Did not advance53.32
12 Constantin Dumitru Flag of Romania (1948-1952).svg  Romania 52.77X50.62Did not advance52.77
13 Bob Backus US flag 48 stars.svg  United States X52.11XDid not advance52.11
14 Reino Kuivamäki Flag of Finland.svg  Finland 51.85X51.59Did not advance51.85
15 Miloš Máca Flag of Czechoslovakia.svg  Czechoslovakia 51.7846.8948.99Did not advance51.78
16 Poul Cederquist Flag of Denmark.svg  Denmark X46.5851.60Did not advance51.60
17 Rudolf Galin Flag of SFR Yugoslavia.svg  Yugoslavia 51.37X50.21Did not advance51.37
18 Duncan Clark Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  Great Britain 51.07X48.95Did not advance51.07
19 Oiva Halmetoja Flag of Finland.svg  Finland 50.7550.82XDid not advance50.82
20 Lauri Tamminen Flag of Finland.svg  Finland XX50.05Did not advance50.05
21 Peter Allday Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  Great Britain 44.2049.70XDid not advance49.70
22 Henri Haest Flag of Belgium (civil).svg  Belgium X48.7848.50Did not advance48.78
23 Pierre Legrain Flag of France.svg  France 44.83X46.38Did not advance46.38
Marty Engel US flag 48 stars.svg  United States XXXDid not advanceNM
Mikhail Krivonosov Flag of the Soviet Union (1936-1955).svg  Soviet Union XXXDid not advanceNM

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References

  1. "Athletics at the 1952 Helsinki Summer Games: Men's Hammer Throw". sports-reference.com. Archived from the original on 17 April 2020. Retrieved 21 January 2018.
  2. 1 2 3 "Hammer Throw, Men". Olympedia. Retrieved 26 January 2021.
  3. Official Report, p. 323.