Athletics at the 1968 Summer Olympics – Women's 100 metres

Last updated
Women's 100 metres
at the Games of the XIX Olympiad
Venue Estadio Olímpico Universitario
DateOctober 14–15
Competitors42 from 22 nations
Winning time11.0 WR
Medalists
Gold medal icon.svg Wyomia Tyus Flag of the United States.svg  United States
Silver medal icon.svg Barbara Ferrell Flag of the United States.svg  United States
Bronze medal icon.svg Irena Szewińska Flag of Poland (1928-1980).svg  Poland
  1964
1972  
Official Video on YouTube TV-icon-2.svg
Official Video on YouTube

The women's 100 metres competition at the 1968 Summer Olympics in Mexico City, Mexico. The event was held at the University Olympic Stadium on October 14–15. [1]

Contents

The race was won by defending champion Wyomia Tyus. She became the first person to defend the championship at 100 metres, a feat later duplicated by Carl Lewis, Gail Devers, Shelly-Ann Fraser and Usain Bolt. Director Bud Greenspan filmed Tyus casually dancing behind her starting blocks before the Olympic final. When interviewed later she said she was doing the "Tighten Up" to stay loose. American commentator Dwight Stones suggests this intimidated her opponents.

In the final, American teenager Margaret Bailes gained a step advantage at the gun. That quickly disappeared as Tyus seized control of the race. The chase was on. The next chasers appeared to be her American teammate Barbara Ferrell and Australian teenager Raelene Boyle. Coming on strong toward the finish was Polish veteran Irena Kirszenstein. Tyus dipped at the finish, but there was nobody near her. Ferrell and Boyle were escorted to the holding area, but Officials reading the new fully automatic time system corrected the results to declare Kirszenstein the bronze medalist. Tyus set the world record while Boyle set the List of world junior record in fourth place.

Tyus was credited with 11.0 hand timed, breaking the tie at 11.1 with several women in this race. Two years later, Chi Cheng, 7th place in this race, equalled her time. Her automatic time of 11.07 was the first noted automatic time record of this event. In the subsequent Olympics, that time was equalled by Renate Stecher, but Tyus' time was downgraded to 11.08. By the time fully automatic timing became mandatory, January 1, 1977, Annegret Richter's 11.01 from the 1976 Olympics had displaced them.

Competition format

The women's 100m competition consisted of heats (Round 1), Quarterfinals, Semifinals and a Final. The five fastest competitors from each race in the heats qualified for the quarterfinals. The four fastest runners from each of the quarterfinal races advanced to the semifinals, where again the top four from each race advance to the final.

Records

Prior to this competition, the existing world and Olympic records were as follows:

World record Flag of Poland.svg  Irena Szewińska  (POL)11.1 Prague, Czechoslovakia July 9, 1965
Olympic recordFlag of the United States.svg  Wyomia Tyus  (USA)11.2 Tokyo, Japan October 15, 1964

Results

Round 1

Heat 1

RankAthleteNationTimeNotes
1 Wyomia Tyus Flag of the United States.svg  United States 11.2Q
2 Val Peat Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  Great Britain 11.5Q
3 Violetta Quesada Flag of Cuba.svg  Cuba 11.6Q
4 Marijana Lubej Flag of SFR Yugoslavia.svg  Yugoslavia 11.6Q
5 Debbie Miller Flag of Canada.svg  Canada 11.7Q
6 Sylviane Telliez Flag of France.svg  France 12.0
7 Esperanza Girón Flag of Mexico (1934-1968).svg  Mexico 12.2

Heat 2

RankAthleteNationTimeNotes
1 Margaret Bailes Flag of the United States.svg  United States 11.2Q
2 Irene Piotrowski Flag of Canada.svg  Canada 11.3Q
3 Miguelina Cobián Flag of Cuba.svg  Cuba 11.4Q
4 Pam Kilborn Flag of Australia.svg  Australia 11.6Q
5 Gabrielle Meyer Flag of France.svg  France 11.6Q
6 Alicia Kaufmanas Flag of Argentina.svg  Argentina 11.8
7 Carmen Smith Flag of Jamaica.svg  Jamaica 11.9

Heat 3

RankAthleteNationTimeNotes
1 Dianne Bowering-Burge Flag of Australia.svg  Australia 11.5Q
2 Fulgencia Romay Flag of Cuba.svg  Cuba 11.5Q
3 Lyudmila Samotyosova Flag of the Soviet Union.svg  Soviet Union 11.5Q
4 Anita Neil Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  Great Britain 11.6Q
5 Oyeronke Akindele Flag of Nigeria.svg  Nigeria 11.6Q
6 Vilma Charlton Flag of Jamaica.svg  Jamaica 11.7
7 Ulla-Britt Wieslander Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden 11.8

Heat 4

RankAthleteNationTimeNotes
1 Irena Szewińska Flag of Poland (1928-1980).svg  Poland 11.3Q
2 Raelene Boyle Flag of Australia.svg  Australia 11.4Q
3 Chi Cheng Flag of the Republic of China.svg  Republic of China 11.4Q
4 Della James Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  Great Britain 11.7Q
5 Karin Reichert-Frisch Flag of the German Olympic Team (1960-1968).svg  West Germany 11.9Q
6 Mária Kiss Flag of Hungary.svg  Hungary 12.0
Lydia Stephens Flag of Kenya.svg  Kenya DNF

Heat 5

RankAthleteNationTimeNotes
1 Eva Glesková Flag of Czechoslovakia.svg  Czechoslovakia 11.6Q
2 Renate Meyer Flag of the German Olympic Team (1960-1968).svg  West Germany 11.7Q
3 Lyudmila Golomazova Flag of the Soviet Union.svg  Soviet Union 11.7Q
4 Truus Hennipman Flag of the Netherlands.svg  Netherlands 11.7Q
5 Stephanie Berto Flag of Canada.svg  Canada 11.8Q
6 Margit Nemesházi Flag of Hungary.svg  Hungary 11.9
7 Josefa Vicent Flag of Uruguay.svg  Uruguay 12.5

Heat 6

RankAthleteNationTimeNotes
1 Barbara Ferrell Flag of the United States.svg  United States 11.2Q
2 Lyudmila Maslakova Flag of the Soviet Union.svg  Soviet Union 11.5Q
3 Wilma van Gool-van den Berg Flag of the Netherlands.svg  Netherlands 11.5Q
4 Olajumoke Bodunrin Flag of Nigeria.svg  Nigeria 11.6Q
5 Györgyi Balogh Flag of Hungary.svg  Hungary 11.8Q
6 Halina Górecka Flag of the German Olympic Team (1960-1968).svg  West Germany 11.8
7 Cecilia Sosa Flag of El Salvador.svg  El Salvador 13.7

Quarterfinals

Heat 1

RankAthleteNationTimeNotes
1 Barbara Ferrell Flag of the United States.svg  United States 11.1Q
2 Eva Glesková Flag of Czechoslovakia.svg  Czechoslovakia 11.2Q
3 Della James Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  Great Britain 11.3Q
4 Miguelina Cobián Flag of Cuba.svg  Cuba 11.4Q
5 Lyudmila Maslakova Flag of the Soviet Union.svg  Soviet Union 11.4
6 Pam Kilborn Flag of Australia.svg  Australia 11.4
7 Truus Hennipman Flag of the Netherlands.svg  Netherlands 11.5
8 Karin Reichert-Frisch Flag of the German Olympic Team (1960-1968).svg  West Germany 11.6

Heat 2

RankAthleteNationTimeNotes
1 Wyomia Tyus Flag of the United States.svg  United States 11.0Q
2 Chi Cheng Flag of the Republic of China.svg  Republic of China 11.3Q
3 Wilma van Gool-van den Berg Flag of the Netherlands.svg  Netherlands 11.4Q
4 Lyudmila Golomazova Flag of the Soviet Union.svg  Soviet Union 11.5Q
5 Marijana Lubej Flag of SFR Yugoslavia.svg  Yugoslavia 11.6
6 Anita Neil Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  Great Britain 11.6
7 Debbie Miller Flag of Canada.svg  Canada 11.6

Heat 3

RankAthleteNationTimeNotes
1 Raelene Boyle Flag of Australia.svg  Australia 11.2Q, OR
2 Margaret Bailes Flag of the United States.svg  United States 11.3Q
3 Val Peat Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  Great Britain 11.3Q
4 Lyudmila Samotyosova Flag of the Soviet Union.svg  Soviet Union 11.4Q
5 Violetta Quesada Flag of Cuba.svg  Cuba 11.6
6 Renate Meyer Flag of the German Olympic Team (1960-1968).svg  West Germany 11.6
7 Oyeronke Akindele Flag of Nigeria.svg  Nigeria 11.7

Heat 4

RankAthleteNationTimeNotes
1 Irena Szewińska Flag of Poland (1928-1980).svg  Poland 11.1Q
2 Dianne Bowering-Burge Flag of Australia.svg  Australia 11.3Q
3 Irene Piotrowski Flag of Canada.svg  Canada 11.3Q
4 Fulgencia Romay Flag of Cuba.svg  Cuba 11.4Q
5 Gabrielle Meyer Flag of France.svg  France 11.6
6 Györgyi Balogh Flag of Hungary.svg  Hungary 11.7

Semi Finals

Heat 1

RankAthleteNationTimeNotes
1 Irena Szewińska Flag of Poland (1928-1980).svg  Poland 11.3Q
2 Barbara Ferrell Flag of the United States.svg  United States 11.3Q
3 Dianne Bowering-Burge Flag of Australia.svg  Australia 11.4Q
4 Chi Cheng Flag of the Republic of China.svg  Republic of China 11.4Q
5 Fulgencia Romay Flag of Cuba.svg  Cuba 11.5
6 Irene Piotrowski Flag of Canada.svg  Canada 11.5
7 Della James Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  Great Britain 11.6
8 Lyudmila Golomazova Flag of the Soviet Union.svg  Soviet Union 11.7

Heat 2

RankAthleteNationTimeNotes
1 Wyomia Tyus Flag of the United States.svg  United States 11.3Q
2 Raelene Boyle Flag of Australia.svg  Australia 11.4Q
3 Margaret Bailes Flag of the United States.svg  United States 11.5Q
4 Miguelina Cobián Flag of Cuba.svg  Cuba 11.6Q
5 Lyudmila Samotyosova Flag of the Soviet Union.svg  Soviet Union 11.6
6 Eva Glesková Flag of Czechoslovakia.svg  Czechoslovakia 11.7
7 Wilma van Gool-van den Berg Flag of the Netherlands.svg  Netherlands 11.8
8 Val Peat Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  Great Britain 11.8

Final

RankAthleteNationTimeNotes
Gold medal icon.svg Wyomia Tyus Flag of the United States.svg  United States 11.0 WR
Silver medal icon.svg Barbara Ferrell Flag of the United States.svg  United States 11.1
Bronze medal icon.svg Irena Szewińska Flag of Poland (1928-1980).svg  Poland 11.1
4 Raelene Boyle Flag of Australia.svg  Australia 11.1WJR
5 Margaret Bailes Flag of the United States.svg  United States 11.3
6 Dianne Bowering-Burge Flag of Australia.svg  Australia 11.4
7 Chi Cheng Flag of the Republic of China.svg  Republic of China 11.5
8 Miguelina Cobián Flag of Cuba.svg  Cuba 11.6

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References

  1. "Athletics at the 1968 Mexico City Summer Games: Women's 100 metres". Sports Reference. Archived from the original on 17 April 2020. Retrieved 28 June 2017.