Best Female Athlete ESPY Award

Last updated
Best Female Athlete ESPY Award
Awarded for best female athlete
Location Los Angeles (2017) [1]
Presented by ESPN
First awarded 2000
Currently held by Simone Biles (USA) [1]
Website www.espn.co.uk/espys/

The Best Female Athlete ESPY Award, known alternatively as the Outstanding Female Athlete ESPY Award, has been presented annually at the ESPY Awards since 1993 to the female voted to be, irrespective of nationality or sport contested, the best athlete in a given calendar year. Between 1993 and 2004, the award voting panel comprised variously of fans; sportswriters and broadcasters, sports executives, and retired sportspersons, termed collectively experts; and ESPN personalities, but balloting thereafter has been exclusively by fans over the Internet from amongst choices selected by the ESPN Select Nominating Committee. Through the 2001 iteration of the ESPY Awards, ceremonies were conducted in February of each year to honor achievements over the previous calendar year; awards presented thereafter are conferred in June and reflect performance from the June previous. [2]

ESPY Award

An ESPY Award is an accolade currently presented by the American broadcast television network ABC, and previously ESPN, to recognize individual and team athletic achievement and other sports-related performance during the calendar year preceding a given annual ceremony. The first ESPYs were awarded in 1993. Because of the ceremony's rescheduling prior to the 2002 iteration thereof, awards presented in 2002 were for achievement and performances during the seventeen-plus previous months. As the similarly styled Grammy, Emmy, Academy Award, and Tony, the ESPYs are hosted by a contemporary celebrity; the style, though, is more relaxed, light, and self-referential than that of many other awards shows, with comedic sketches usually included.

Generally speaking, a calendar year begins on the New Year's Day of the given calendar system and ends on the day before the following New Year's Day, and thus consists of a whole number of days. A year can also be measured by starting on any other named day of the calendar, and ending on the day before this named day in the following year. This may be termed a "year's time", but not a "calendar year". To reconcile the calendar year with the astronomical cycle certain years contain extra days.

Contents

Five athletes, American soccer player Mia Hamm, Swedish golfer Annika Sörenstam, American alpine skier Lindsey Vonn, American tennis player Serena Williams, and American mixed martial artist Ronda Rousey have won the award twice. Hamm was honored in 1998 and 2000, Sörenstam in 2005 and 2006, Vonn in 2010 and 2011, Williams in 2003 and 2013, and Rousey in 2014 and 2015. Sörenstam and Monica Seles are the only honorees not to represent the United States at the time of their win. Of the winners, six have played basketball, the most of any sport; the only other sports with multiple individuals awarded are tennis and gymnastics.

United States federal republic in North America

The United States of America (USA), commonly known as the United States or America, is a country composed of 50 states, a federal district, five major self-governing territories, and various possessions. At 3.8 million square miles, the United States is the world's third or fourth largest country by total area and is slightly smaller than the entire continent of Europe's 3.9 million square miles. With a population of over 327 million people, the U.S. is the third most populous country. The capital is Washington, D.C., and the largest city by population is New York City. Forty-eight states and the capital's federal district are contiguous in North America between Canada and Mexico. The State of Alaska is in the northwest corner of North America, bordered by Canada to the east and across the Bering Strait from Russia to the west. The State of Hawaii is an archipelago in the mid-Pacific Ocean. The U.S. territories are scattered about the Pacific Ocean and the Caribbean Sea, stretching across nine official time zones. The extremely diverse geography, climate, and wildlife of the United States make it one of the world's 17 megadiverse countries.

Association football team field sport

Association football, more commonly known as football or soccer, is a team sport played with a spherical ball between two teams of eleven players. It is played by 250 million players in over 200 countries and dependencies, making it the world's most popular sport. The game is played on a rectangular field called a pitch with a goal at each end. The object of the game is to score by moving the ball beyond the goal line into the opposing goal.

Mia Hamm American association football player

Mariel Margaret Hamm-Garciaparra is an American retired professional soccer player, two-time Olympic gold medalist, and two-time FIFA Women's World Cup champion. Hailed as a soccer icon, she played as a forward for the United States women's national soccer team from 1987–2004. Hamm was the face of the Women's United Soccer Association (WUSA), the first professional women's soccer league in the United States, where she played for the Washington Freedom from 2001–2003. She played college soccer for the North Carolina Tar Heels women's soccer team and helped the team win four consecutive NCAA Division I Women's Soccer Championship titles.

List of winners

YearImageAthleteNation representedSportRef(s)
1993 Monica Seles 1991.jpg Seles, Monica Monica Seles Flag of FR Yugoslavia.svg  Yugoslavia Tennis [3]
1994 Julie Krone riding Halfbridled at 2003 Breeders' cup.jpg Krone, Julie Julie Krone Flag of the United States.svg  United States Thoroughbred horse racing [4]
1995 Bonnie Blair(crop).jpg Blair, Bonnie Bonnie Blair Flag of the United States.svg  United States Speed skating [5]
1996 Rebecca Lobo taken by Danny Karwoski.jpg Lobo, Rebecca Rebecca Lobo Flag of the United States.svg  United States Basketball [6]
1997 Amy Van Dyken (33365854492).jpg Van Dyken, Amy Amy Van Dyken Flag of the United States.svg  United States Swimming [7]
1998 Mia Hamm 1995 001 stl.jpg Hamm, Mia Mia Hamm Flag of the United States.svg  United States Soccer [8]
1999 Chamique Holdsclaw.jpg Holdsclaw, Chamique Chamique Holdsclaw Flag of the United States.svg  United States Basketball [9]
2000 Mia Hamm signing an autograph.jpg Hamm, Mia Mia Hamm (2)Flag of the United States.svg  United States Soccer [10]
2001 Marion Jones Sydney 2000.JPEG Jones, Marion Marion Jones Flag of the United States.svg  United States Track and field [11]
2002 VenusWilliams (cropped).jpg Williams, Venus Venus Williams Flag of the United States.svg  United States Tennis [12]
2003 Serena Williams hits.jpg Williams, Serena Serena Williams Flag of the United States.svg  United States Tennis [13]
2004 Diana taurasi flickr.jpg Taurasi, Diana Diana Taurasi Flag of the United States.svg  United States Basketball [14]
2005 AnnikaSorenstamProAm2006.JPG Sörenstam, Annika Annika Sörenstam Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden Golf [15]
2006 2008 LPGA Championship - Annika Sorenstam tee shot.jpg Sörenstam, Annika Annika Sörenstam (2)Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden Golf [15]
2007 Taryne Mowatt at the 2008 Lotus Lounge Red Carpet.jpg Mowatt, Taryne Taryne Mowatt Flag of the United States.svg  United States Softball [16]
2008 Candace Parker 2012.jpg Parker, Candace Candace Parker Flag of the United States.svg  United States Basketball [17]
2009 Nastia Liukin 2009.jpg Liukin, Nastia Nastia Liukin Flag of the United States.svg  United States Gymnastics [18]
2010 Lindsey Vonn (Vancouver 2010)-2.jpg Vonn, Lindsey Lindsey Vonn Flag of the United States.svg  United States Alpine skiing [19]
2011 Lindsey Vonn (2011).jpg Vonn, Lindsey Lindsey Vonn (2)Flag of the United States.svg  United States Alpine skiing [20]
2012 Griner dunking at 2015 All-Star game.jpg Griner, Brittney Brittney Griner Flag of the United States.svg  United States Basketball [21]
2013 Serena Williams at 2013 US Open.jpg Williams, Serena Serena Williams (2)Flag of the United States.svg  United States Tennis [22]
2014 Ronda Rousey retouch.jpg Rousey, Ronda Ronda Rousey Flag of the United States.svg  United States Mixed martial arts [23]
2015 Rondarousey.jpg Rousey, Ronda Ronda Rousey (2)Flag of the United States.svg  United States Mixed martial arts [24]
2016 BreannaStewart foulshot.jpg Stewart, Breanna Breanna Stewart Flag of the United States.svg  United States Basketball [25]
2017 Simone Biles na Rio 2016 cropped.jpg Biles, Simone Simone Biles Flag of the United States.svg  United States Gymnastics [1]

Statistics

Winners by sport contested
Sport contested Winners (awards) Winners (individuals)
Basketball 66
Tennis 43
Gymnastics 22
Alpine skiing 21
Association football 21
Golf 21
Mixed martial arts 21
Track and field 11
Softball 11
Speed skating 11
Swimming 11
Thoroughbred horse racing 11
Winners by nation represented
Nation Winners (awards) Winners (individuals)
Flag of the United States.svg  United States 2116
Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden 21
Flag of FR Yugoslavia.svg  Yugoslavia 11

See also

Notes

  1. 1 2 3 Felt, Hunter (13 July 2017). "ESPY Awards 2017: Simone Biles and Russell Westbrook win Best Athletes – as it happened". The Guardian. Archived from the original on 18 October 2017. Retrieved 31 October 2017.
  2. Because of the rescheduling of the ESPY Awards ceremony, the award presented in 2002 was given in consideration of performance betwixt February 2001 and June 2002.
  3. Bodenheimer, George (28 May 2015). Every Town Is a Sports Town: Business Leadership at ESPN, from the Mailroom to the Boardroom. Grand Central Publishing. ISBN   978-1455586097. Archived from the original on 31 October 2017. Retrieved 31 October 2017.
  4. Boyer Sagert, Kelly; Overman, Steven J. (13 February 2012). Icons of Women's Sport. Greenwood Press. p. 335. ISBN   978-0313385483. Archived from the original on 31 October 2017.
  5. "Young, Blair earn top ESPY awards". Deseret News. 14 February 1995. Archived from the original on 31 October 2017. Retrieved 31 October 2017.
  6. "Ripken, Lobo cart off two ESPYs each". Deseret News. 13 February 1996. Archived from the original on 31 October 2017. Retrieved 31 October 2017.
  7. "ESPY Award Winners". Las Vegas Sun. 11 February 1997. Retrieved 1 November 2017.
  8. Boyer Sagert, Kelly; Overman, Steven J. (13 February 2012). Icons of Women's Sport. Greenwood Press. p. 235. ISBN   978-0313385483. Archived from the original on 31 October 2017.
  9. "Awards: McGwire top ESPY winner". Kitsap Sun. 16 February 1999. Archived from the original on 31 October 2017. Retrieved 31 October 2017.
  10. "And the ESPY goes to ... Jordan". Deseret News. 15 February 2000. Archived from the original on 31 October 2017. Retrieved 31 October 2017.
  11. "ESPY winners". Las Vegas Sun. 13 February 2001. Archived from the original on 31 October 2017. Retrieved 31 October 2017.
  12. "Woods Wins Three ESPYs". Los Angeles Times. July 11, 2002. Retrieved 31 October 2017.
  13. "Armstrong, Serena Williams earn athlete of the year honors". Deseret News. 17 July 2003. Archived from the original on 31 October 2017. Retrieved 31 October 2017.
  14. "Armstrong wins ESPY Award". The Hindu. 16 July 2004. Retrieved 31 October 2017.
  15. 1 2 "Annika Sorenstam". LPGA. Archived from the original on 16 April 2016. Retrieved 31 October 2017.
  16. Harris, Beth (12 July 2007). "Chargers' Tomlinson Wins 4 ESPY Awards". The Washington Post. Archived from the original on 31 October 2017. Retrieved 31 October 2017.
  17. "Tiger, NY Giants, Parker Big Winners at ESPYs". The Washington Post. 17 July 2008. Archived from the original on 31 October 2017. Retrieved 31 October 2017.
  18. "Phelps a big winner at ESPY Awards". ABC. 15 July 2009. Archived from the original on 31 October 2017. Retrieved 31 October 2017.
  19. Harris, Beth (14 July 2010). "Brees, Vonn take home top ESPYs". Deseret News. Archived from the original on 23 July 2010. Retrieved 31 October 2017.
  20. Tourtellotte, Bob (14 July 2011). "Mavericks, Nowitzki shine at Espy Awards". Reuters. Archived from the original on 31 October 2017. Retrieved 31 October 2017.
  21. "Miami Heat, LeBron James score big at the ESPYs". Reuters. 12 July 2012. Archived from the original on 31 October 2017. Retrieved 31 October 2017.
  22. Grant, Ethan (18 July 2013). "ESPY 2013 Winners: Robin Roberts, LeBron James and Athletes Who Stole the Show". Bleacher Report.
  23. Zucker, Joseph (17 July 2014). "ESPY 2014 Winners: Awards Results, Recap, Top Moments and Twitter Reaction". Bleacher Report. Archived from the original on 1 May 2017. Retrieved 31 October 2017.
  24. Nathan, Alec (16 July 2015). "ESPY Awards 2015 Results: Analyzing LeBron James, Stephen Curry, Other Winners". Bleacher Report. Archived from the original on 19 July 2015. Retrieved 31 October 2017.
  25. Evans, Jayda (13 July 2016). "Storm rookie Breanna Stewart wins ESPY, demands equality for pro female athletes". The Seattle Times. Archived from the original on 21 September 2016. Retrieved 31 October 2017.

Related Research Articles

Annika Sörenstam Swedish golfer

Annika Sörenstam is a retired Swedish American professional golfer. She is regarded as one of the best golfers in history. Before stepping away from competitive golf at the end of the 2008 season, she had won 90 international tournaments as a professional, making her the female golfer with the most wins to her name. She has won 72 official LPGA tournaments including ten majors and 18 other tournaments internationally, and she tops the LPGA's career money list with earnings of over $22 million—over $2 million ahead of her nearest rival while playing 149 fewer events. Since 2006, Sörenstam has held dual American and Swedish citizenship.

Karrie Webb Australian golfer

Karrie Ann Webb is an Australian professional golfer. She plays mainly on the U.S.-based LPGA Tour and also turns out once or twice a year on the ALPG Tour in her home country. She is a member of the World Golf Hall of Fame. She has 41 wins on the LPGA Tour, more than any other active player.

The Laureus World Sports Award for Sportsman of the Year is an annual award honouring the achievements of individual men from the world of sports. It was first awarded in 2000 as one of the seven constituent awards presented during the Laureus World Sports Awards. The awards are presented by the Laureus Sport for Good Foundation, a global organisation involved in more than 150 charity projects supporting 500,000 young people. The first ceremony was held on 25 May 2000 in Monte Carlo, at which Nelson Mandela gave the keynote speech. As of 2018, a shortlist of six nominees for the award comes from a panel composed of the "world's leading sports editors, writers and broadcasters". The Laureus World Sports Academy then selects the winner who is presented with a Laureus statuette, created by Cartier, at the annual awards ceremony held in various locations around the world. The awards are considered highly prestigious and are frequently referred to as the sporting equivalent of "Oscars".

The Best Male Athlete ESPY Award, known alternatively as the Outstanding Male Athlete ESPY Award, has been presented annually at the ESPY Awards since 1993 to the male voted irrespective of nationality or sport contested, adjudged to be the best athlete in a given calendar year. Between 1993 and 2004, the award voting panel comprised variously fans; sportswriters and broadcasters, sports executives, and retired sportspersons, termed collectively experts; and ESPN personalities, but balloting thereafter has been exclusively by fans over the Internet from amongst choices selected by the ESPN Select Nominating Committee. Through the 2001 iteration of the ESPY Awards, ceremonies were conducted in February of each year to honor achievements over the previous calendar year; awards presented thereafter are conferred in June and reflect performance from the June previous.

The Best Male College Athlete ESPY Award was an annual award honoring the achievements of a male individual from the world of collegiate sports. It was first presented as part of the ESPY Awards in 2002, following the subsumption of the Best College Football Player and Best Male College Basketball Player ESPY Awards, each of which Best Male College Basketball Player ESPY Award were presented annually between 1993 and 2001, inclusive. The Best Male College Athlete ESPY Award trophy, designed by sculptor Lawrence Nowlan, was awarded to the sportsman adjudged to be the best in a given calendar year of those contesting collegiate sport in the United States through the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA). Since 2004, the winner was chosen by online voting through choices selected by the ESPN Select Nominating Committee. Before that, determination of the winners was made by an panel of experts. Through the 2001 iteration of the ESPY Awards, ceremonies were conducted in February of each year to honor achievements over the previous calendar year; awards presented thereafter are conferred in July and reflect performance from the June previous.

The Best Female College Athlete ESPY Award was an annual award honoring the achievements of a female individual from the world of collegiate sports. It was first presented as part of the ESPY Awards in 2002, following the subsumption of the Best Female College Basketball Player ESPY Award, which was presented annually between the 1993 and 2001 ceremonies, inclusive. The Best Female College Athlete ESPY Award trophy, designed by sculptor Lawrence Nowlan, was awarded to the sportswoman adjudged to be the best in a given calendar year of those contesting collegiate sport in the United States through the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA). Since the 2004 awards, the winner was chosen by online voting through three to five nominees selected by the ESPN Select Nominating Committee. Before that, determination of the winners was made by an panel of experts. Through the 2001 iteration of the ESPY Awards, ceremonies were conducted in February of each year to honor achievements over the previous calendar year; awards presented thereafter are conferred in July and reflect performance from the June previous.

The Best Outdoor Sportsman ESPY Award was an annual award honoring the achievements of an athlete from the world of outdoor sports —understood as those related to outdoor recreation and nature-based occupation, including sport fishing, most especially of bass, and lumberjacking, most especially the logrolling, wood chopping, and high-climbing disciplines thereof—on an amateur or professional level primarily in the United States or Canada. It was first presented as part of the ESPY Awards at the 2002 edition after broadcaster ESPN purchased the Bass Anglers Sportsman Society in the summer of 2001. The Best Outdoor Sportsman ESPY Award trophy, designed by sculptor Lawrence Nowlan, was given to the outdoor sportsperson adjudged to be the best in a given calendar year. From the 2004 to 2008 ceremonies, the winner was chosen by online voting through choices selected by the ESPN Select Nominating Committee. Before that, determination of the winners was made by an panel of experts. Through the 2001 iteration of the ESPY Awards, ceremonies were conducted in February of each year to honor achievements over the previous calendar year; awards presented thereafter are conferred in July and reflect performance from the June previous.

The Best Breakthrough Athlete ESPY Award, known alternatively as the Breakthrough Athlete of the Year ESPY Award, is an annual award honoring the achievements of an individual in the world of sports. It was first awarded as part of the ESPY Awards in 1993. The Best Breakthrough Athlete ESPY Award trophy, created by sculptor Lawrence Nowlan, is awarded to the sportsperson adjudged to have made the greatest breakthrough in a major international individual sport or North American professional team sport. The award is typically given to a sportsperson in his or her rookie season at a given level but may be won by any athlete who in a given year improves his or her performance dramatically or otherwise becomes well-recognized. Since 2004, the winner has been chosen by online voting through choices selected by the ESPN Select Nominating Committee. Before that, determination of the winners was made by an panel of experts. Through the 2001 iteration of the ESPY Awards, ceremonies were conducted in February of each year to honor achievements over the previous calendar year; awards presented thereafter are conferred in July and reflect performance from the June previous.

The Best MLS Player ESPY Award is an annual award honoring the achievements of an individual from the world of Major League Soccer (MLS). It was first awarded as part of the ESPY Awards in 2006. The Best MLS Player ESPY Award trophy, designed by sculptor Lawrence Nowlan, is presented to the Major League Soccer player adjudged to be the best in a given calendar year at the annual ESPY Awards ceremony in Los Angeles. Balloting for the award is undertaken by fans over the Internet from between three and five nominees selected by the ESPN Select Nominating Committee, which is composed by a panel of experts. It is conferred in July to reflect performance and achievement over the preceding twelve months, which generally includes a portion of each of two MLS seasons.

The Best Game ESPY Award is an annual award honoring the achievements of a team who has performed the best play in the world of sports. It was first awarded as part of the ESPY Awards in 2002. The Best Game ESPY Award trophy, designed by sculptor Lawrence Nowlan, is awarded to the team on the single regular season or playoff game contested professionally under the auspices of one of the four major North American leagues or collegiately under the auspices of the National Collegiate Athletic Association adjudged, in view of its quality, competitiveness, excitement, and significance, to be the best. Since 2004, the winner has been chosen by online voting through choices selected by the ESPN Select Nominating Committee. Before that, determination of the winners was made by an panel of experts. Through the 2001 iteration of the ESPY Awards, ceremonies were conducted in February of each year to honor achievements over the previous calendar year; awards presented thereafter are conferred in July and reflect performance from the June previous.

The Best International Athlete ESPY Award is an award given to the sportsperson, irrespective of gender or sport contested, adjudged to have been the best or most outstanding of those born outside, or not possessing citizenship, of the United States who contest a major international individual sport primarily in the United States or a North American professional team sport in a given calendar year. From 2008 to 2009, the award was split into Best Female International Athlete ESPY Award and Best Male International Athlete ESPY Award. The award was discontinued after 2009, but was reinstated in 2012.

The Arthur Ashe Courage Award is presented as part of the ESPY Awards. It is named for the American tennis player Arthur Ashe. Although it is a sport-oriented award, it is not limited to sports-related people or actions, as it is presented annually to individuals whose contributions "transcend sports". According to ESPN, the organization responsible for giving out the award, "recipients reflect the spirit of Arthur Ashe, possessing strength in the face of adversity, courage in the face of peril and the willingness to stand up for their beliefs no matter what the cost". The award has been presented as part of the ESPY Awards ceremony at the Microsoft Theater in Los Angeles since 2008.

The Best Record-Breaking Performance ESPY Award has been presented since 2001 to the amateur or professional sportsperson, irrespective of nationality or sport contested, adjudged to have, in a single play, game, or season, completed the best record-breaking performance, irrespective of the nature of the record broken.

The Best Male Athlete with a Disability ESPY Award is an annual award honoring the achievements of a male individual from the world of disabled sports. Established with the aid of disability advocate and former United States Paralympic soccer player Eli Wolff, the accolade's trophy, designed by sculptor Lawrence Nowlan, is presented to the disabled sportsman adjudged to be the best at the annual ESPY Awards ceremony in Los Angeles. The Best Male Athlete with a Disability ESPY Award was first bestowed as part of the ESPY Awards in 2005 after the non-gender specific Best Athlete with a Disability ESPY Award was presented the previous three years. Balloting for the award is undertaken by fans over the Internet from between three and five choices selected by the ESPN Select Nominating Committee, which is composed of a panel of experts. It is conferred in July to reflect performance and achievement over the preceding twelve months.

The Best Male Action Sports Athlete ESPY Award is an annual award honoring the achievements of a male athlete from the world of action sports. It was first awarded as part of the ESPY Awards in 2004 after the non-gender-specific Best Action Sports Athlete ESPY Award was presented the previous two years. The Best Male Action Sports Athlete ESPY Award trophy, created by sculptor Lawrence Nowlan, is presented to the male adjudged to be the best action sports athlete in a given calendar year. Balloting for the award is undertaken by fans over the Internet from between three and five choices selected by the ESPN Select Nominating Committee, which is composed of a panel of experts. It is conferred in July to reflect performance and achievement over the preceding twelve months.

The Best Female Action Sports Athlete ESPY Award is an annual award honoring the achievements of a female athlete from the world of action sports. It was first awarded as part of the ESPY Awards in 2004 after the non-gender-specific Best Action Sports Athlete ESPY Award was presented the previous two years. It is given to the female, irrespective of nationality or sport contested, adjudged to be the best action sports athlete in a given calendar year. Balloting for the award is undertaken by fans over the Internet from between three and five choices selected by the ESPN Select Nominating Committee, which is composed of a panel of experts. It is conferred in July to reflect performance and achievement over the preceding twelve months.

The Best Fighter ESPY Award is an annual award honoring the achievements of an individual from the world of combat sports. It was first awarded as part of the ESPY Awards in 2007, following the subsumption of the Best Boxer ESPY Award, which was limited exclusively to boxers. The Best Fighter ESPY Award trophy, created by sculptor Lawrence Nowlan, is presented to the professional or amateur boxer or mixed martial artist adjudged to be the best in a given calendar year at the annual ESPY Awards ceremony in Los Angeles. Balloting for the award is undertaken by fans over the Internet from between three and five choices selected by the ESPN Select Nominating Committee, which is composed of a panel of experts. It is conferred in July to reflect performance and achievement over the preceding twelve months.

The Laureus World Sports Award for Sportsperson of the Year with a Disability is an annual award honouring the achievements of individual disabled athletes from the world of Paralympic sports. It was first awarded in 2000 as one of the seven constituent awards presented during the Laureus World Sports Awards. The awards are presented by the Laureus Sport for Good Foundation, a global organisation involved in more than 150 charity projects supporting 500,000 young people. The first ceremony was held on 25 May 2000 in Monte Carlo, at which Nelson Mandela gave the keynote speech. Nominations for the award come from a specialist panel. The Laureus World Sports Academy then selects the winner who is presented with a Laureus statuette, created by Cartier, at an annual awards ceremony held in various locations around the world. The awards are considered highly prestigious and are frequently referred to as the sporting equivalent of "Oscars".

The Laureus World Sports Award for Action Sportsperson of the Year, known as the Alternative Sportsperson of the Year prior to 2007, is an annual award honouring the achievements of individual athletes from the world of action sports. It was first awarded in 2000 as one of the seven constituent awards presented during the Laureus World Sports Awards. The awards are presented by the Laureus Sport for Good Foundation, a global organisation involved in more than 150 charity projects supporting 500,000 young people. The first ceremony was held on 25 May 2000 in Monte Carlo, at which Nelson Mandela gave the keynote speech. Nominations for the award come from a specialist panel. The Laureus World Sports Academy then selects the winner who is presented with a Laureus statuette, created by Cartier, at an annual awards ceremony held in various locations around the world. The awards are considered highly prestigious and are frequently referred to as the sporting equivalent of "Oscars".

The Laureus Spirit of Sport Award is an award honouring "those individual athletes or teams who, through their remarkable success, their refusal to accept defeat or their unquestionable contribution to the enjoyment of the game". It was first awarded in 2005 as one of the discretionary awards presented during the Laureus World Sports Awards. The awards are presented by the Laureus Sport for Good Foundation, a global organisation involved in more than 150 charity projects supporting 500,000 young people. The first ceremony was held on 25 May 2000 in Monte Carlo, at which Nelson Mandela gave the keynote speech. The recipient is presented with a Laureus statuette, created by Cartier, at an annual awards ceremony held in various locations around the world. Although the Laureus Awards ceremony is held annually, the Spirit of Sport Award is not necessarily presented every time; it is one of a number of discretionary awards that can be given by the Laureus World Sports Academy. Since its establishment, no award has been made four times, in 2009, 2010, 2012 and 2013.

References

Library of Congress (de facto) national library of the United States of America

The Library of Congress (LOC) is the research library that officially serves the United States Congress and is the de facto national library of the United States. It is the oldest federal cultural institution in the United States. The Library is housed in three buildings on Capitol Hill in Washington, D.C.; it also maintains the National Audio-Visual Conservation Center in Culpeper, Virginia. The Library's functions are overseen by the Librarian of Congress, and its buildings are maintained by the Architect of the Capitol. The Library of Congress has claims to be the largest library in the world. Its "collections are universal, not limited by subject, format, or national boundary, and include research materials from all parts of the world and in more than 450 languages."