Bud Held

Last updated
Bud Held
Personal information
BornOctober 25, 1927 (1927-10-25) (age 93)
Los Angeles, California, U.S.
Medal record

Franklin Wesley "Bud" Held (born October 25, 1927) is an American athlete primarily notable for his performance throwing the javelin. He was born in Los Angeles, California.

Contents

College career

Held started as a pole vaulter at Grossmont High School near San Diego, where he finished in a 3-way tie for 4th place at the 1946 CIF California State Meet. [1] He switched to the javelin while a student at Stanford University, where he won the NCAA javelin championship in 1948, 1949, and 1950. [2] [3] Held won the AAU USA Outdoor Track and Field Championships six times, 1949, 1951, 1953 to 55 and 1958. [4] Held set six American records in the javelin, and in 1953 became the first American to hold the world javelin record with an effort of 263 feet 10 inches (80.42 m); in so doing, Held became the first athlete ever to throw the 800-gram (1.8 lb) javelin over 80 m (260 ft). [2] He set a second world record of 268 feet 2 inches (81.74 m) in 1955, and his career best throw was 270 feet 0 inches (82.30 m) in 1956. [2]

International competition

Held was a member of the United States' 1952 Olympic team where he placed ninth [5] after a shoulder injury, and missed making the 1956 Olympic team by an inch. [2] He won a gold medal in the 1955 Pan American Games in 1955 with a throw of 69.77 meters (228.9 ft). [6]

Master's competition

Held continues to compete in masters competitions. In 1970, Held set a United States national masters javelin record of 229 ft 3 in (69.88 m). [2] On October 4, 2008 at the Club West Masters Track meet in Santa Barbara, Held set the age 80+ World Record in the pole vault [7] adding to the M75 World Record he already holds. He is also ranked in the discus. [8] He also coaches his live-in partner Nadine O'Connor, [9] who holds the women's 65+ pole vault world record, among numerous other track and field records. [10]

Outside of competition

After his retirement from standard competition, Held became a sporting equipment businessman. [2] He founded Ektelon, inventing the world's first aluminum tennis racquet and its related stringing equipment from his San Diego garage, then subsequently the first aluminum racquetball racquet. [11] He also invented a hollow javelin that was used into the 1960s, but his design was later outlawed due to safety concerns. [2] [12]

Honors

Held was inducted into the USA Track & Field Hall of Fame in 1987, [2] the USATF Masters Hall of Fame in 2005 [13] and is a member of the Stanford Athletic Hall of Fame. [14]

Related Research Articles

Lillian Copeland American athlete

Lillian Copeland was an American track and field athlete, who excelled in weight throwing. She has been called "the most successful female discus thrower in U.S. history", and also held multiple titles in shot put and javelin throwing.

Stacy Dragila American pole vaulter

Stacy Renée Dragila is an American former pole vaulter.

Kate Schmidt American javelin thrower

Kathryn Joan "Kate" Schmidt is an American former world record holder in the javelin throw. A native of California, graduate of Woodrow Wilson Classical High School, and alumnus of UCLA, she won bronze medals at the 1972 and 1976 Olympics. She qualified for the 1980 Olympics, but did not compete due to the 1980 Summer Olympics boycott. She placed fourth at the 1984 Olympic Trials.

Jeff Hartwig American pole vaulter

Jeff Hartwig is an American pole vaulter.

Lance Deal American hammer thrower

Lance Earl Deal is a former American athlete who won a silver medal in the hammer throw in the 1996 Summer Olympics in Atlanta, Georgia. He also competed in the 1988, 1992, and 2000 Summer Olympics.

Masters athletics is a class of the sport of athletics for athletes of over 30 years of age. Events include track and field, road running and cross country running. Competitors are bracketed into five-year age groups. For international events the first age group is 35 to 39. Men as old as 105 and women in their 100s have competed in running, jumping and throwing events. Masters athletes are sometimes known as "veterans" and the European Masters Championships, for instance, is known as "Eurovets." This and other high level events including biennial World Championships cater largely to elite-level athletes, but many masters athletes are novices to athletics and enjoy the camaraderie offered by masters competition at the local, National and International level. Most National governing bodies for track and field hold annual Masters championships. Prestigious National meets such as the Penn Relays and the United States Olympic Trials put on exhibition events for top masters athletes. Masters athletics is growing Internationally with over 6000 athletes competing at recent World Championships. World; National and Regional records are maintained for each age group.

Bud Houser

Lemuel Clarence "Bud" Houser was an American field athlete. He won Olympic gold medals in the discus throw in 1924 and 1928 and in the shot put in 1924.

Dr. Georg Werthner is a decathlete from Austria, who was the first athlete to finish four Olympic decathlons. In the 1988 Olympics, Daley Thompson crossed the finish-line a little more than 18 seconds after him to become the second athlete to do this.

Rex Jay Harvey was an American decathlete. He has designed and holds patents of several nozzles for aircraft engines. Also, he helped design several nuclear reactor power plants.

Flint Hanner American javelin thrower

John Flint Hanner was an American track and field athlete and coach. He won the first NCAA javelin championship in 1921 and later worked as the track coach at Fresno State University for 35 years. He was also one of the founders and the long-time director of the West Coast Relays.

Phil Northrup

Philip M. Northrup was an American track and field athlete. He won the NCAA javelin championship in 1925 and 1926 and tied for the NCAA championship in the pole vault in 1925.

Nadine OConnor

Nadine O'Connor is a retired mathematics teacher and a world record setting, hall of fame Masters Track and Field athlete. While she specializes in the pole vault, due to her athletic training, she also holds the World Masters Athletics world records in the 100 metres, 200 metres, the Indoor 60 metres and 200 metres. She also holds the American record in the long jump, 80 metre hurdles, 300 metre hurdles and pentathlon.

Philipa Raschker

Eileen-Philippa "Phil" Raschker is a German-born American masters athlete.

Thomas Lewis Gage was an American Hammer Thrower from Billings, Montana. Gage graduated from Cornell University in 1965. During the late 1960s to the early 1970s he was in the top 10 among American hammer throwers for 10 years including achieving number 1 in 1972. He won the gold medal at the 1967 Pan American Games in Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada and was a finalist in the 1972 Olympics in Munich, Germany, ultimately finishing 12th. His personal best was 71.17, set in 1971.

Albert Richmond "Boo" Morcom was an American track and field athlete.

Donald Pellmann was an American centenarian multi world-record-setting masters athlete. He held the current M90 world record in the long jump, high jump, discus throw, and indoor pole vault. Additionally, he also held the American records in the 100 metres, triple jump, shot put, and javelin throw. He lived in an assisted senior living facility in Santa Clara, California.

Larry Stuart was an American track and field athlete, known primarily for the javelin throw.

USATF Masters Outdoor Championships masters track and field competition

The USATF Masters Outdoor Championships is an annual track and field competition which serves as the national championship for the United States for athletes in masters age groups. Organized by USA Track & Field, the national governing body for the sport, the competition was first held in 1968. Athletes compete in 5-year age groups, beginning from 25 and up to 105. Traditionally limited to athletes over 35, a "pre-masters" group was introduced in 2020 to encourage post-collegiate athletes over 25 to continue competing.

USATF Masters Indoor Championships masters track and field competition

The USATF Masters Indoor Championships is an annual track and field competition which serves as the national indoor championship for the United States for athletes in masters age groups. Organized by USA Track & Field, the national governing body for the sport, the competition was first held in 1975. Athletes compete in 5-year age groups, beginning from 25 and up to 105. Traditionally limited to athletes over 35, a "pre-masters" group was introduced from 2020 onwards to encourage post-collegiate athletes over 25 to continue competing.

References

  1. "California State Meet Results - 1915 to present". Hank Lawson. Archived from the original on 2014-10-06. Retrieved 2012-12-25.
  2. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 "Franklin (Bud) Held". USATF.com. Retrieved 2007-08-10.
  3. http://web1.ncaa.org/web_files/stats/track_outdoor_champs_records/2006/MD1.pdf
  4. "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2012-09-18. Retrieved 2012-10-31.CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  5. Franklin Held at Sports Reference
  6. "Pan American Games". GBRAthletics.com. Retrieved 2007-08-10.
  7. "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2012-08-03. Retrieved 2012-08-03.CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link) WMA Men's World Records
  8. "USA Masters Track and Field Rankings: Bud Held". USATF.com. Archived from the original on 2007-10-07. Retrieved 2007-08-10.
  9. "Couple show age is no barrier in track and field". USA Today . July 8, 2009. Retrieved December 7, 2009.
  10. "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2010-05-27. Retrieved 2010-02-07.CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link) WMA Women's World Records
  11. "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2009-12-09. Retrieved 2009-12-06.CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link) Ektelon history
  12. "Get the point?". ScienceIQ.com. Archived from the original on 2007-08-06. Retrieved 2007-08-10.
  13. http://www.usatf.org/HallOfFame/Masters/ USATF Masters Hall of Fame
  14. "The Stanford Athletic Hall of Fame". Stanford Athletics website. Archived from the original on 2008-08-27. Retrieved 2007-08-10.