Chatton

Last updated

Chatton
Chatton War Memorial - geograph.org.uk - 2463670.jpg
Northumberland UK location map.svg
Red pog.svg
Chatton
Location within Northumberland
Population338 (2011 census) [1]
OS grid reference NU054281
Unitary authority
Ceremonial county
Region
Country England
Sovereign state United Kingdom
Post town ALNWICK
Postcode district NE66
Dialling code 01668
Police Northumbria
Fire Northumberland
Ambulance North East
UK Parliament
List of places
UK
England
Northumberland
55°32′49″N1°54′50″W / 55.547°N 1.914°W / 55.547; -1.914 Coordinates: 55°32′49″N1°54′50″W / 55.547°N 1.914°W / 55.547; -1.914

Chatton is a village in Northumberland, in England. It is roughly 6 km (3.7 mi) to the east of Wooler.

Contents

History

Chatton has been occupied for many centuries. There has been a church on the site since the twelfth century. [2] There is evidence of occupation in prehistoric times: a rock overhang at nearby Ketley Crag has examples of pre-historic rock art petroglyphs, including a profusion of cup and ring marks, which have been described as "stunning". [3]

Writing in 2003, local historian Joy Palmer-Cooper described Chatton as an "'estate' village", mainly from the nineteenth century. Palmer-Cooper identified five Grade II listed buildings in Chatton: "Chatton Park House ..., Chatton Bridge, the former Chatton United Reformed Church, the Blacksmith's Shop, and Broomhouse Farmhouse." [4] In 2013, Grade II listed building status was also awarded to the Parish Church. [5]

Nearby, though not within the main village itself, there are former tower houses such as Fowberry Tower and Hetton Hall, Grade II* listed fifteenth century tower houses later incorporated in country houses. [6] [7] (Both these houses are privately owned, and not open to the general public.)

Economy

The village has amenities which include a pub (the Percy Arms) and village shop.[ citation needed ]

Religious sites

Holy Cross church Holy Cross church, Chatton - geograph.org.uk - 1419129.jpg
Holy Cross church

The present-day Holy Cross Church on Church Hill Road is a Grade II listed building. It replaced an earlier thirteenth century building, and was constructed between 1763 and 1770 with later extensions. [5] The church - which belongs to the Church of England - holds regular services and is part of the southern benefice of Glendale. [8]

From 1850 to 1980, the Presbyterian Church of Chatton (from 1972, a United Reformed Church) stood on New Road. In 1979, serious structural damage was found and the building closed, with the congregation conducting services in Holy Cross Church's building. The old Presbyterian Church building passed into private ownership; since 1995, it has housed the Chatton Gallery. [9]

See also

Related Research Articles

Lindisfarne Tidal island in northeast England

The Holy Island of Lindisfarne, commonly known as either Holy Island or Lindisfarne, is a tidal island off the northeast coast of England, which constitutes the civil parish of Holy Island in Northumberland. Holy Island has a recorded history from the 6th century AD; it was an important centre of Celtic Christianity under Saints Aidan of Lindisfarne, Cuthbert, Eadfrith of Lindisfarne and Eadberht of Lindisfarne. After the Viking invasions and the Norman conquest of England, a priory was reestablished. A small castle was built on the island in 1550.

Harwell, Oxfordshire Human settlement in England

Harwell is a village and civil parish in the Vale of White Horse about 2 miles (3 km) west of Didcot, 6 miles (10 km) east of Wantage and 13 miles (21 km) south of Oxford. The parish measures about 3.5 miles (6 km) north – south, and almost 2 miles (3 km) east – west at its widest point. In 1923 its area was 2,521 acres (1,020 ha). Historically in Berkshire, it has been administered as part of Oxfordshire, England, since the 1974 boundary changes. The parish includes part of the Milton Park business park in the north and part of Harwell Science and Innovation Campus in the southwest. In the east it includes part of the new Great Western Park housing estate that is contiguous with the built-up area of Didcot. The 2011 Census recorded the parish's population as 2,349.

Haltwhistle Human settlement in England

Haltwhistle is a market town and civil parish in Northumberland, England, 10 miles (16 km) east of Brampton. It had a population of 3,811 at the 2011 Census.

Ramsbury Human settlement in England

Ramsbury is a village and civil parish in the English county of Wiltshire. The village is in the Kennet Valley near the Berkshire boundary. The nearest towns are Hungerford about 4.5 miles (7.2 km) east and Marlborough about 5.5 miles (8.9 km) west. The much larger town of Swindon is about 12 miles (19 km) to the north.

Bellingham, Northumberland Village in Northumberland, England

Bellingham is a village in Northumberland, to the north-west of Newcastle upon Tyne and is situated on the Hareshaw Burn at its confluence with the River North Tyne.

Swalcliffe Human settlement in England

Swalcliffe is a village and civil parish about 5 miles (8 km) west of Banbury in Oxfordshire. The parish is about 2+12 miles (4 km) long north–south and about 1 mile (1.6 km) east–west. The 2011 Census recorded the population of the modern Swalcliffe parish as 210. The toponym "Swalcliffe" comes from the Old English swealwe and clif, meaning a slope or cliff frequented by swallows. The ancient parish of Swalcliffe was larger than the present civil parish, and included the townships of Epwell, Shutford, Sibford Ferris and Sibford Gower.

Alnham Human settlement in Northumberland, England.

Alnham is a hamlet and civil parish in Northumberland, England. It is about 14 miles (23 km) west of Alnwick, about 6 miles (9.7 km) from Scotland and is located on the south of a small tributary of the River Aln. The village stands on uneven ground, sloping from south to north, at the foot of the southern outliers of the Cheviot Hills. The River Aln flows eastward through the village from its source in the Cheviot Hills down to the coast. The layout of the village appears to have been dictated by the river. The estimated population taken at the 2011 Census was around 245.

Bolam, Northumberland Human settlement in England

Bolam is a village and former civil parish, now in the parish of Belsay in the county of Northumberland, England. The village is about 20 miles (32 km) north-west of Newcastle upon Tyne, near Bolam West Houses. In 1951 the civil parish had a population of 60. On 1 April 1955 it was merged into Belsay.

Yelling, Cambridgeshire Human settlement in England

Yelling is a linear village and civil parish in the Huntingdonshire administrative district of Cambridgeshire, England. The village is about 5 miles (8 km) east of St Neots and 6 miles (10 km) south of Huntingdon.

Ampney Crucis Human settlement in England

Ampney Crucis is a village and civil parish in the Cotswolds, part of the Cotswold District of Gloucestershire, England.

Kyloe Human settlement in England

Kyloe is a civil parish in the county of Northumberland, about 8 miles (13 km) south-east of Berwick-on-Tweed.

Woodeaton Human settlement in England

Woodeaton or Wood Eaton is a village and civil parish about 4 miles (6.4 km) northeast of Oxford, England. It also has a special needs school called Woodeaton Manor School.

Fowberry Tower

Fowberry Tower is a Grade II* listed mansion house, situated on the banks of the River Till, near Chatton, Northumberland.

Ettington Human settlement in England

Ettington is a village and civil parish about 5.5 miles (9 km) south-east of Stratford-upon-Avon in Warwickshire, England. The 2011 Census recorded the parish's population as 1,171.

Horton, Chatton Human settlement in England

Horton is a pair of small settlements, West Horton and East Horton, divided by a stream - the Horton Burn - in Northumberland, England 3 miles (5 km) north east of Wooler and 5 miles (8 km) west of Belford.

Sandford St. Martin Human settlement in England

Sandford St Martin is a village and civil parish in West Oxfordshire about 7 miles (11 km) east of Chipping Norton and about 12 miles (19 km) south of Banbury. The 2011 Census recorded the parish's population as 209.

Nether Worton Human settlement in England

Nether Worton is a hamlet in Oxfordshire, about 6+12 miles (10.5 km) south of Banbury and 7 miles (11 km) east of Chipping Norton. Nether Worton was a separate civil parish until 1932, when it was merged with Over Worton to form the current civil parish of Worton.

Over Worton Human settlement in England

Over Worton is a hamlet in Oxfordshire, about 7 miles (11 km) south of Banbury and 7+12 miles (12 km) east of Chipping Norton. Over Worton was a separate civil parish until 1932, when it was merged with Nether Worton to form the current civil parish of Worton.

Ratcheugh Observatory

Ratcheugh Observatory is a late 18th-century folly on a prominent crag between Alnwick and Longhoughton in north Northumberland, England. Commissioned by Hugh Percy, 1st Duke of Northumberland, the castellated Observatory incorporates a viewing tower with prospects of Alnwick and its castle, and of the North Sea coast at Boulmer.

Widdrington Village

Widdrington is a village and a civil parish in the county of Northumberland, England. It borders Tritlington and West Chevington and East Chevington parishes to the north, the North Sea to the east, Cresswell and Ellington and Linton parishes to the south, and Widdrington Station and Stobswood parish to the west.

References

  1. "Parish population 2011" . Retrieved 3 July 2015.
  2. "Northumberland Communities - Chatton". Northumberland County Council. Retrieved 3 June 2018.
  3. "Ketley Crag Rock Shelter" at rockart.ncl.ac.uk Archived 15 April 2012 at the Wayback Machine
  4. Palmer-Cooper, Joy A., ed. (2003). Chatton: A Portrait; A Celebration of Life Past and Present in a North Northumberland Village (1st ed.). ABE. p. 131. ISBN   0-9546474-0-8.
  5. 1 2 Historic England. "Holy Cross Church, Chatton (1415535)". National Heritage List for England . Retrieved 3 June 2018.
  6. Historic England. "Fowberry Tower (1370883)". National Heritage List for England . Retrieved 6 June 2018.
  7. Historic England. "Hetton Hall, Chatton (1277031)". National Heritage List for England . Retrieved 3 June 2018.
  8. "Holy Cross - Chatton" (church website). Self-published. Retrieved 3 June 2018.
  9. Palmer-Cooper, Joy A., ed. (2003). Chatton: A Portrait; A Celebration of Life Past and Present in a North Northumberland Village (1st ed.). ABE. pp. 175–177. ISBN   0-9546474-0-8.

Further reading