Chatton

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Chatton
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Chatton
Location within Northumberland
Population338 (2011 census) [1]
OS grid reference NU054281
Unitary authority
Ceremonial county
Region
Country England
Sovereign state United Kingdom
Post town ALNWICK
Postcode district NE66
Dialling code 01668
Police Northumbria
Fire Northumberland
Ambulance North East
EU Parliament North East England
UK Parliament
List of places
UK
England
Northumberland
55°32′49″N1°54′50″W / 55.547°N 1.914°W / 55.547; -1.914 Coordinates: 55°32′49″N1°54′50″W / 55.547°N 1.914°W / 55.547; -1.914

Chatton is a village in Northumberland, in England. It is roughly 6 km (3.7 mi) to the east of Wooler.

Northumberland County of England

Northumberland is a county in North East England. The northernmost county of England, it borders Cumbria to the west, County Durham and Tyne and Wear to the south and the Scottish Borders to the north. To the east is the North Sea coastline with a 64 miles (103 km) path. The county town is Alnwick, although the County council is based in Morpeth.

England Country in north-west Europe, part of the United Kingdom

England is a country that is part of the United Kingdom. It shares land borders with Wales to the west and Scotland to the north. The Irish Sea lies west of England and the Celtic Sea to the southwest. England is separated from continental Europe by the North Sea to the east and the English Channel to the south. The country covers five-eighths of the island of Great Britain, which lies in the North Atlantic, and includes over 100 smaller islands, such as the Isles of Scilly and the Isle of Wight.

Wooler town in Northumberland, England

Wooler is a small town in Northumberland, England. It lies on the edge of the Northumberland National Park, near the Cheviot Hills. It is a popular base for walkers and is referred to as the "Gateway to the Cheviots". As well as many shops and pubs, the town has a youth hostel, many hotels, and campsites. It lies on the St. Cuthbert's Way long-distance footpath between Melrose Abbey and Lindisfarne.

Contents

History

Chatton has been occupied for many centuries. There has been a church on the site since the twelfth century. [2] There is evidence of occupation in prehistoric times: a rock overhang at nearby Ketley Crag has examples of pre-historic rock art petroglyphs, including a profusion of cup and ring marks, which have been described as "stunning". [3]

Rock art human-made markings on natural stone

In archaeology, rock art is human-made markings placed on natural stone; it is largely synonymous with parietal art. A global phenomenon, rock art is found in many culturally diverse regions of the world. It has been produced in many contexts throughout human history, although the majority of rock art that has been ethnographically recorded has been produced as a part of ritual. Such artworks are often divided into three forms: petroglyphs, which are carved into the rock surface, pictographs, which are painted onto the surface, and earth figures, formed on the ground. The oldest known rock art dates from the Upper Palaeolithic period, having been found in Europe, Australia, Asia and Africa. Archaeologists studying these artworks believe that they likely had magico-religious significance.

Petroglyph pictogram and logogram images carved on a rock surface

A petroglyph is an image created by removing part of a rock surface by incising, picking, carving, or abrading, as a form of rock art. Outside North America, scholars often use terms such as "carving", "engraving", or other descriptions of the technique to refer to such images. Petroglyphs are found worldwide, and are often associated with prehistoric peoples. The word comes from the Greek prefix petro-, from πέτρα petra meaning "stone", and γλύφω glýphō meaning "to carve", and was originally coined in French as pétroglyphe.

Cup and ring mark form of prehistoric art

Cup and ring marks or cup marks are a form of prehistoric art found mainly in the Atlantic seaboard of Europe (Ireland, Wales, Northern England, Scotland, France, Portugal, and Spain – and in Mediterranean Europe – Italy and Greece, as well as in Scandinavia and in Switzerland. Evidence suggests that immigrants from the Fertile Crescent, rather than native British tribes, built Britain's Stonehenge and similar megaliths which bear cup-marks.

Writing in 2003, local historian Joy Palmer-Cooper described Chatton as an "'estate' village", mainly from the nineteenth century. Palmer-Cooper identified five Grade II listed buildings in Chatton: "Chatton Park House ..., Chatton Bridge, the former Chatton United Reformed Church, the Blacksmith's Shop, and Broomhouse Farmhouse." [4] In 2013, Grade II listed building status was also awarded to the Parish Church. [5]

Listed building Protected historic structure in the United Kingdom

A listed building, or listed structure, is one that has been placed on one of the four statutory lists maintained by Historic England in England, Historic Environment Scotland in Scotland, Cadw in Wales, and the Northern Ireland Environment Agency in Northern Ireland.

Nearby, though not within the main village itself, there are former tower houses such as Fowberry Tower and Hetton Hall, Grade II* listed fifteenth century tower houses later incorporated in country houses. [6] [7] (Both these houses are privately owned, and not open to the general public.)

Tower house type of stone structure, built for defensive and habitation purposes

A tower house is a particular type of stone structure, built for defensive purposes as well as habitation.

Fowberry Tower

Fowberry Tower is a Grade II* listed mansion house, situated on the banks of the River Till, near Chatton, Northumberland.

Tower houses in Britain and Ireland group of castles in Britain and Ireland

The tower house appeared in the British Isles, starting from the High Middle Ages. Such buildings were constructed in the wilder parts of Great Britain and Ireland, particularly in Scotland, and throughout Ireland, until at least up to the 17th century. The remains of such structures are dotted around the Irish and Scottish countryside, with a particular concentration in the Scottish Borders where they include peel towers and bastle houses. Some are still intact and even inhabited today, while others stand as ruined shells.

Economy

The village has amenities which include a pub (the Percy Arms) and village shop.

Religious sites

The present-day Holy Cross Church on Church Hill Road is a Grade II listed building. It replaced an earlier thirteenth century building, and was constructed between 1763 and 1770 with later extensions. [5] The church - which belongs to the Church of England - holds regular services and is part of the southern benefice of Glendale. [8]

Church of England Anglican state church of England

The Church of England is the established church of England. The Archbishop of Canterbury is the most senior cleric, although the monarch is the supreme governor. The Church of England is also the mother church of the international Anglican Communion. It traces its history to the Christian church recorded as existing in the Roman province of Britain by the third century, and to the 6th-century Gregorian mission to Kent led by Augustine of Canterbury.

Glendale, Northumberland area of Northumberland, England

Glendale is the name of a valley in North Northumberland that runs from the Cheviot Hills at Kirknewton onto the Milfield Plain, formed by the River Glen. However, the name is generally taken to indicate the area around the town of Wooler.

From 1850 to 1980, the Presbyterian Church of Chatton (from 1972, a United Reformed Church) stood on New Road. In 1979, serious structural damage was found and the building closed, with the congregation conducting services in Holy Cross Church's building. The old Presbyterian Church building passed into private ownership; since 1995, it has housed the Chatton Gallery. [9]

See also

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References

  1. "Parish population 2011" . Retrieved 3 July 2015.
  2. "Northumberland Communities - Chatton". Northumberland County Council. Retrieved 3 June 2018.
  3. "Ketley Crag Rock Shelter" at rockart.ncl.ac.uk Archived April 15, 2012, at the Wayback Machine
  4. Palmer-Cooper, Joy A., ed. (2003). Chatton: A Portrait; A Celebration of Life Past and Present in a North Northumberland Village (1st ed.). ABE. p. 131. ISBN   0-9546474-0-8.
  5. 1 2 Historic England. "Holy Cross Church, Chatton (1415535)". National Heritage List for England . Retrieved 3 June 2018.
  6. Historic England. "Fowberry Tower (1370883)". National Heritage List for England . Retrieved 6 June 2018.
  7. Historic England. "Hetton Hall, Chatton (1277031)". National Heritage List for England . Retrieved 3 June 2018.
  8. "Holy Cross - Chatton" (church website). Self-published. Retrieved 3 June 2018.
  9. Palmer-Cooper, Joy A., ed. (2003). Chatton: A Portrait; A Celebration of Life Past and Present in a North Northumberland Village (1st ed.). ABE. pp. 175–177. ISBN   0-9546474-0-8.

Further reading