Classification of inhabited localities in Russia

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The classification system of inhabited localities in Russia and some other post-Soviet states has certain peculiarities compared with the classification systems in other countries.[ citation needed ]

Contents

Modern classification in Russia

During the Soviet time, each of the republics of the Soviet Union, including the Russian SFSR, had its own legislative documents dealing with classification of inhabited localities. [1] After the dissolution of the Soviet Union, the task of developing and maintaining such classification in Russia was delegated to the federal subjects. [2] While currently there are certain peculiarities to classifications used in many federal subjects, they are all still largely based on the system used in the RSFSR. In all federal subjects, the inhabited localities are classified into two major categories: urban and rural. [3] Further divisions of these categories vary slightly from one federal subject to another, [2] but they all follow common trends described below.

Urban localities

Vyborg, a town in Leningrad Oblast Vyborg SevernyVal3-5 006 8242.jpg
Vyborg, a town in Leningrad Oblast

In 1957, the procedures for categorizing urban-type settlements were further refined. [5]

Rural localities

Multiple types of rural localities exist, some common through the whole territory of Russia, some specific to certain federal subjects. The most common types include:

Historical terms

See also

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Vaninsky District District in Khabarovsk Krai, Russia

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Sevsky District District in Bryansk Oblast, Russia

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Shuryshkarsky District District in Yamalo-Nenets Autonomous Okrug, Russia

Shuryshkarsky District is an administrative and municipal district (raion), one of the seven in Yamalo-Nenets Autonomous Okrug of Tyumen Oblast, Russia. It is located in the southwest of the autonomous okrug. The area of the district is 54,016 square kilometers (20,856 sq mi). Its administrative center is the rural locality of Muzhi. Population: 9,814 ; 9,559 (2002 Census); 9,001 (1989 Census). The population of Muzhi accounts for 36.8% of the district's total population.

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Altukhovo, Bryansk Oblast Urban locality in Navlinsky District of Bryansk Oblast, Russia

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Suzemka Urban locality in Bryansk Oblast, Russia

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Bytosh Urban locality in Bryansk Oblast, Russia

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Belaya Beryozka Urban locality in Bryansk Oblast, Russia

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References

  1. In the Russian SFSR, the issues of the administrative and territorial division, including the system of classification of the inhabited localities, was regulated by the Statute On Procedure of Resolving the Issues of the Administrative-Territorial Structure of the RSFSR, approved by the Decree of the Presidium of the Supreme Soviet of the RSFSR on August 17, 1982 (Положение "О порядке решения вопросос административно-территориального устройства РСФСР", утверждённое Указом Президиума Верховного Совета РСФСР от 17 августа 1982 г.)
  2. 1 2 Articles 71 and 72 of the Constitution of Russia do not name issues of the administrative and territorial structure among the tasks handled on the federal level or jointly with the governments of the federal subjects. As such, all federal subjects pass their own laws establishing the system of the administrative-territorial divisions on their territories.
  3. See, for example, the results of the 2002 population Census
  4. Постановление ВЦИК и СНК РСФСР от 15 сентября 1924 г. "Общее положение о городских и сельских поселениях и посёлках" (Resolution of the All-Union Executive Committee and the Soviet of People's Commissars of September 15, 1924 General Statute on Urban and Rural Settlements)
  5. Указ Президиума ВС РСФСР от 12 сентября 1957 г. "О порядке отнесения населённых пунктов к категории городов, рабочих и курортных посёлков" (Decree of the Presidium of the Supreme Soviet of the RSFSR of September 12, 1957 On Procedures of Categorizing the Inhabited Localities as Cities, Work and Resort Settlements)