Resort

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Resorts combine a hotel and a variety of recreations, such as swimming pools, as shown here in San Diego, California Town and Country fh000023.jpg
Resorts combine a hotel and a variety of recreations, such as swimming pools, as shown here in San Diego, California
Kayaking provided by a lakeside resort in Jasper, Alberta Pyramid resort jasper.JPG
Kayaking provided by a lakeside resort in Jasper, Alberta

A resort (North American English) is a self-contained commercial establishment that tries to provide most of a vacationer's wants, such as food, drink, lodging, sports, entertainment, and shopping, on the premises. The term resort may be used for a hotel property that provides an array of amenities, typically including entertainment and recreational activities. A hotel is frequently a central feature of a resort, such as the Grand Hotel at Mackinac Island, Michigan. Some resorts are also condominium complexes that are timeshares or owned fractionally or wholly owned condominium. A resort is not always a commercial establishment operated by a single company, but in the late 20th century, that sort of facility became more common.

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In British English, "resort" means a town which people visit for holidays and days out which usually contains hotels at which such holidaymakers stay. Examples would include Blackpool and Brighton.

Destination resort

Hotel Puijonmaja, Puijo, Kuopio, Finland Puijonmaja.jpg
Hotel Puijonmaja, Puijo, Kuopio, Finland
Banff Springs Hotel, Banff, Alberta, Canada Banff Springs Hotel1.jpg
Banff Springs Hotel, Banff, Alberta, Canada

A destination resort is a resort that itself contains the necessary guest attraction capabilities so it does not need to be near a destination (town, historic site, theme park, or other) to attract its patrons. A commercial establishment at a resort destination such as a recreational area, a scenic or historic site, amusement park, a gaming facility, or other tourist attraction may compete with other businesses at a destination. Consequently, another quality of a destination resort is that it offers food, drink, lodging, sports, entertainment, and shopping within the facility so that guests have no need to leave the facility throughout their stay. Commonly, the facilities are of higher quality than would be expected if one were to stay at a hotel or eat in a town's restaurants. Some examples are Atlantis in the Bahamas; the Walt Disney World Resort, near Orlando, Florida, United States; PortAventura World, near Barcelona on the Costa Daurada in Spain; Costa do Sauípe, Northeastern Brazil; Laguna Phuket, Thailand and Sun City, near Johannesburg, South Africa. Closely related to resorts are convention and large meeting sites. Generally, they occur in cities, where special meeting halls, together with ample accommodations and varied dining and entertainment, are provided.

All-inclusive resort

Entrance of an all-inclusive resort in Egypt Happy Life Entrance.JPG
Entrance of an all-inclusive resort in Egypt

An all-inclusive resort charges a fixed price that includes most or all items. At a minimum, most inclusive resorts include lodging, unlimited food, drink, sports activities, and entertainment for the fixed price. In recent years, the number of resorts in the United States offering "all-inclusive" amenities has decreased dramatically. In 1961, over half offered such plans, but in 2007, less than a tenth do so. [1]

All-inclusive resorts are found in the Caribbean, particularly in Jamaica, Dominican Republic; in Egypt, and elsewhere. Notable examples are Club Med, Sandals Resorts, and Beaches Resorts.

An all-inclusive resort includes three meals daily, soft drinks, most alcoholic drinks, gratuities, and usually other services in the price. Many also offer sports and other activities included in the price as well. They are often located in warmer regions. The all-inclusive model originated in the Club Med resorts, which were founded by the Belgian Gérard Blitz. [2]

Some all-inclusive resorts are designed for specific groups. For example, some resorts cater for adults only, and even more-specialized properties accept couples only. Other all-inclusive resorts are geared toward families, with facilities like craft centers, game rooms, and water parks to keep children of all ages entertained. All-inclusive resorts are also very popular locations for destination weddings.

Boating resort in Vijayawada, India Boating Resort in Vijayawada.jpg
Boating resort in Vijayawada, India

Recreation

A spa resort is a short-term residential/lodging facility with the primary purpose of providing individual services for spa goers to develop healthy habits. Historically, many such spas were developed at the location of natural hot springs or sources of mineral waters. Typically over a seven-day stay, such facilities provide a comprehensive program that includes spa services, physical fitness activities, healthy diet programs, and special interest programming.

Golf resorts are resorts that cater specifically to the sport of golf, and they include access to one or more golf courses and/or clubhouses. Golf resorts typically provide golf packages that provide visitors with all greens and cart fees, range balls, accommodations, and meals.

A view of a typical ski resort and ski lifts Male Ciche.jpg
A view of a typical ski resort and ski lifts

In North America, a ski resort is generally a destination resort in a ski area. The term is less likely to refer to a town or village.

The Las Vegas strip in 2009 Las Vegas 63.jpg
The Las Vegas strip in 2009

A megaresort is a type of destination resort of an exceptionally-large size, such as those along the Las Vegas Strip. In Singapore, integrated resort is a euphemism for a casino-based destination resort.

A holiday village is a type of self-contained resort in Europe whose accommodation is generally in villas. A holiday camp, in the United Kingdom, refers to a resort whose accommodation is in chalets or static caravans.

Timeshare

There are more than 1500 timeshare resorts in the United States that are operated by major hospitality, timeshare-specific, or independent companies. They represent 198,000 residences and nearly 9 million owners, who pay an average $880 per year in maintenance fees. A reported 16% of the residences became vacation rentals. [3]

Notable historic resorts

Resort towns

Towns that are resorts or in which tourism or vacationing is a major part of the local activity are sometimes called resort towns. If by the sea, they are called seaside resorts. Inland resorts include ski resorts, mountain resorts and spa towns. Well-known resort towns include Punta Cana in Dominican Republic, Bandipur in Nepal, Bali in Indonesia, Sochi in Russia, Mount Lebanon Tourism in Lebanon, Barizo in Spain, Cortina d'Ampezzo in Italy, Druskininkai in Lithuania, Cartagena de Indias in Colombia, Cancún in Mexico, Newport, Rhode Island, and Key West, Florida, in the United States, Ischgl in Austria, St. Moritz in Switzerland and Blackpool in the United Kingdom.

A resort island in the Maldives HuvafenFushi.jpg
A resort island in the Maldives

A resort island is an island or an archipelago that contains resorts, hotels, restaurants, tourist attractions, and its amenities. Maldives is considered to have the best island resorts, which have become famous among the top celebrities and sportspersons around the world.

Miami Beach in Florida Miamimetroarea.jpg
Miami Beach in Florida

Seaside resorts are located on a coast. In the United Kingdom, many seaside towns have turned to other entertainment industries, and some of them have much nightlife. The cinemas and theatres often remain to become host to a number of pubs, bars, restaurants, and nightclubs. Most of their entertainment facilities cater to local people, and the beaches still remain popular during the summer months.

Ruka's resort town in Kuusamo Ruka Village (8361909910).jpg
Ruka's resort town in Kuusamo

In Europe and North America, ski resorts are towns and villages in ski areas, with support services for skiing such as hotels and chalets, equipment rental, ski schools and ski lifts to access the slopes.

Resorts for different purposes also exist. An example is Yulara, Northern Territory, which exists to serve Uluru (Ayers Rock) and Kata Tjuta (The Olgas) in Australia.

See also

Related Research Articles

Hotel Establishment that provides lodging paid on a short-term basis

A hotel is an establishment that provides paid lodging on a short-term basis. Facilities provided inside a hotel room may range from a modest-quality mattress in a small room to large suites with bigger, higher-quality beds, a dresser, a refrigerator and other kitchen facilities, upholstered chairs, a flat screen television, and en-suite bathrooms. Small, lower-priced hotels may offer only the most basic guest services and facilities. Larger, higher-priced hotels may provide additional guest facilities such as a swimming pool, business centre, childcare, conference and event facilities, tennis or basketball courts, gymnasium, restaurants, day spa, and social function services. Hotel rooms are usually numbered to allow guests to identify their room. Some boutique, high-end hotels have custom decorated rooms. Some hotels offer meals as part of a room and board arrangement. In the United Kingdom, a hotel is required by law to serve food and drinks to all guests within certain stated hours. In Japan, capsule hotels provide a tiny room suitable only for sleeping and shared bathroom facilities.

Ski resort Resort developed for skiing, snowboarding, and other winter sports

A ski resort is a resort developed for skiing, snowboarding, and other winter sports. In Europe, most ski resorts are towns or villages in or adjacent to a ski area – a mountainous area with pistes and a ski lift system. In North America, it is more common for ski areas to exist well away from towns, so ski resorts usually are destination resorts, often purpose-built and self-contained, where skiing is the main activity.

A seaside resort is a town, village, or hotel that serves as a vacation resort and is located on a coast. Sometimes the concept includes an aspect of official accreditation based on the satisfaction of certain requirements, such as in the German Seebad. Where a beach is the primary focus for tourists, it may be called a beach resort.

Mont Tremblant Resort

Mont Tremblant Ski Resort is a year-round resort in the Laurentian Mountains of Quebec, Canada, located about 130 km (80 mi) northwest of Montreal. It is best known as a ski destination, but also features Lake Tremblant suitable for swimming and two golf courses in the summer months. The name of the mountain, Mont Tremblant, was derived from the Algonquin indigenous people, who called it the "trembling mountain." The summit is at an elevation of 875 m (2,871 ft), which makes it one of the tallest peaks in the Laurentians. One km north of the principal down hill area is the Edge, an area of glade skiing and 2.8 km north of that is the true summit, Pic Johanssen 932 m, which has a trail over the top and is Black Diamond for skiers and boarders. The resort is owned by Alterra Mountain Company.

An all-inclusive resort is a holiday resort that includes at a minimum lodging, three meals daily, soft drinks, most alcoholic drinks, gratuities, and possibly other services in the price. Many also offer sports and non-motorized watersports and other activities that are included in the price as well. They are often located in warmer regions of the world, particularly in Mexico and the Caribbean. The all-inclusive model originated in the French Club Med resorts, which were founded by the Belgian Gérard Blitz in 1950.

Spa Location where mineral-rich spring water is used to give medicinal baths

A spa is a location where mineral-rich spring water is used to give medicinal baths. Spa towns or spa resorts typically offer various health treatments, which are also known as balneotherapy. The belief in the curative powers of mineral waters goes back to prehistoric times. Such practices have been popular worldwide, but are especially widespread in Europe and Japan. Day spas are also quite popular and offer various personal care treatments.

Disneys Wilderness Lodge

Disney's Wilderness Lodge is a AAA Four-Diamond Award–winning resort hotel located at the Walt Disney World Resort. It opened on May 28, 1994. The resort is owned and operated by Disney Parks, Experiences and Products. Disney's Wilderness Lodge is located in the Magic Kingdom Resort Area on Bay Lake. The resort is also located near Disney's Fort Wilderness Resort & Campground. A similarly-themed resort, Disney's Grand Californian Hotel & Spa, is located at the Disneyland Resort in California.

Vacation rental

A vacation rental is the renting out of a furnished apartment, house, or professionally managed resort-condominium complex on a temporary basis to tourists as an alternative to a hotel. The term vacation rental is mainly used in the US. In Europe the term villa rental or villa holiday is preferred for rentals of detached houses in warm climates. Other terms used are self-catering rentals, holiday homes, holiday lets, cottage holidays and gites.

Disneys Saratoga Springs Resort & Spa

Disney's Saratoga Springs Resort & Spa is a Disney Vacation Club (DVC) resort at the Walt Disney World Resort. The resort is the seventh Disney Vacation Club resort and is situated on the former site of the Disney Institute. It first opened May 17, 2004 and was built in three phases. It is now the largest Disney Vacation Club resort. The resort was inspired by the city of Saratoga Springs, New York. Like all other DVC properties, it is considered a deluxe resort.

Disneys Old Key West Resort

Disney's Old Key West Resort is a Disney Vacation Club resort at the Walt Disney World Resort. It opened on December 20, 1991 and was formerly known as Disney's Vacation Club Resort until January 1996 when it was renamed. It was the first Disney Vacation Club Timeshare Resort, and has the largest rooms of any of the fifteen Disney Vacation Club Resorts. The accommodations include kitchen facilities and a laundry room. The rooms are designed in a Key West theme. Rooms are also available year-round for rental by non-members as Disney Vacation Club retains ownership of a majority of the resort.

Marriotts Grande Vista

Marriott's Grande Vista is a Marriott Vacation Club resort, located off of International Drive in Orlando, Florida. The timeshare resort is the largest within the Marriott Vacation Club portfolio and has 1616 guest studios, one, two and three-bedroom villas, located in 24 mission-style buildings.

Travel + Leisure Co. is an American timeshare company headquartered in Orlando, Florida. It develops, sells, and manages timeshare properties under several vacation ownership clubs, including Club Wyndham and WorldMark by Wyndham, and provides timeshare exchange services, primarily through RCI.

WaterColor is an unincorporated master-planned community located in Seagrove Beach on the Northwest Gulf Coast of Florida, United States near Destin. This 499-acre (2.02 km2) Southern resort and residential community was planned by Cooper, Robertson & Partners with Urban Design Associates, under the direction of The St. Joe Company. The St. Joe Company has owned the land since 1927. WaterColor is located in Walton County.

A resort hotel is a hotel which often contains full-sized luxury facilities with full-service accommodations and amenities. These hotels may attract both business conferences and vacationing tourists and offer more than a convenient place to stay. These hotels may be referred to as major conference center hotels, flagship hotels, destination hotels, and destination resorts. The market for conference and resort hotels is a subject for market analysis.

Crystal Mountain (Michigan)

Crystal Mountain Resort is a resort and conference center located in Weldon Township, Benzie County, Michigan, just west of Thompsonville. The resort's area forms the Crystal Mountain census-designated place. The resort offers recreational activities including downhill and cross country skiing the winter months, and golf, water activities, and an alpine slide in other seasons. The resort was founded in 1956. In March 2015 the resort announced it was planning a $9 million expansion project that will add new ski runs, lifts, lodging, retail and other amenities.

Woodloch Pines is an all-inclusive resort located in Hawley, Pennsylvania, on Lake Teedyuskung in the northeast Pocono Mountains Lake Region. The nearest large city is Scranton which is 40 miles away. The resort has been owned by the Kiesendahl Family since 1958 and is open all year round. In recent years, Woodloch has expanded to include Woodloch Springs, a championship golf course and housing community, and The Lodge at Woodloch, a destination spa. Woodloch Pines, Woodloch Springs, and The lodge at Woodloch are all separate resorts.

Gray Rocks was a year-round privately owned resort in the Laurentian Mountains of Quebec, Canada, first developed as a ski destination on Sugarloaf Hill. The ski hill had 22 downhill trails: 4 easy, 10 intermediate, 8 expert. Also available was a snowboarding park and instruction from the Snow Eagle Ski School.

Aulani

Aulani, a Disney Resort & Spa, is a beachside resort hotel at the Ko Olina Resort in Kapolei, Hawaii on the island of Oahu. Affiliated with the Disney Vacation Club, Aulani was the third Disney "stand-alone" hotel that is located in an area without any adjacent theme park. The others are Disney's Hilton Head Island Resort and Disney's Vero Beach Resort.

Holiday Valley (ski resort)

Holiday Valley Resort, known more commonly as just Holiday Valley, is a family-oriented vacation spot and ski resort in Ellicottville, New York. Established in 1957 by Nelson Pauly, John Fisher and Bill Northrup, the facility opened with four runs and one T-bar lift. Currently the resort contains 60 slopes and 13 lifts. Since its opening Holiday Valley has experienced steady growth and has become the main tourist attraction in Cattaraugus County. In 1995 the Inn at Holiday Valley opened, turning the slope into a self-contained ski resort.

The following outline is provided as an overview of and topical guide to tourism:

References

  1. "American Plan resorts among last of vanishing breed". CNN.com. Associated Press. June 28, 2007. Archived from the original on 2007-06-29. Retrieved 2007-06-29.
  2. Garrett Nagle (1999). Tourism, Leisure and Recreation. Nelson Thornes. ISBN   0-17-444705-1.
  3. "2015 State of the Industry". Developments. Retrieved July 1, 2015.
  4. Perkins-Vadez, Dolen (2010). Wench. Amistad. ASIN   B004NE8RZ4.
  5. O'Neal Parker, Lonnae. "A tender spot in master-slave relations". Washington Post. Retrieved 15 April 2015.
  6. "Old Wilberforce University Campus at Tawawa Springs". The Historical Marker Database. Retrieved May 28, 2015.