Deputy Premier of South Australia

Last updated
Deputy Premier of South Australia
South Australian Coat of Arms.svg
Flag of South Australia.svg
Chapman2018.jpg
Incumbent
Vickie Chapman

since 19 March 2018
Department of the Premier and Cabinet
Style The Honourable
Member of
Reports to Premier of South Australia
Seat 45 Pirie Street, Adelaide
NominatorPremier of South Australia
Appointer Governor of South Australia
on the advice of the premier
Term length At the Governor's pleasure
Formation26 March 1968
First holder Des Corcoran

The Deputy Premier of South Australia is the second-most senior officer in the Government of South Australia. The Deputy Premiership is a ministerial portfolio in the Cabinet of South Australia, and the Deputy Premier is appointed by the Governor on the advice of the Premier of South Australia.

Contents

The current Deputy Premier since 2018 is Vickie Chapman of the South Australian Division of the Liberal Party of Australia. [1]

History

The office of Deputy Premier was created in March 1968. The first to serve in the position was Labor deputy leader Des Corcoran. Prior to that time the term was sometimes used unofficially for the second-highest ranking minister in the government, usually the Treasurer.

In both Labor and Liberal governments, the Deputy Premier is usually the party's deputy leader.

Two Deputy Premiers have subsequently become Premier in their own right: Des Corcoran and Rob Kerin. This last happened in 2001, when Rob Kerin became premier after John Olsen's resignation. Dean Brown did the reverse, becoming Deputy Premier to Rob Kerin, 5 years after his own premiership ended at the hands of John Olsen.

South Australia's longest-serving Deputy Premier is Kevin Foley, who served in the position from March 2002 to February 2011.

Duties

The duties of the Deputy Premier are to act on behalf of the Premier in his or her absence overseas or on leave. The Deputy Premier has additionally always held at least one substantive portfolio. It is possible for a minister to hold only the portfolio of Deputy Premier, but this has never happened.

If the Premier were to die, become incapacitated or resign, the Governor would normally appoint the Deputy Premier as Premier. If the governing or majority party had not yet elected a new leader, that appointment would be on an interim basis. Should a different leader emerge, that person would then be appointed Premier.

List of deputy premiers of South Australia

#NameTook officeLeft officePartyPremier
1 Des Corcoran 26 March 196816 April 1968 Labor Don Dunstan
- Des Corcoran 2 July 197015 March 1979Labor Don Dunstan
2 Hugh Hudson 15 March 197918 September 1979Labor Des Corcoran
3 Roger Goldsworthy 18 September 197910 November 1982 Liberal Dr David Tonkin
4 Jack Wright 10 November 198216 July 1985Labor John Bannon
5 Don Hopgood 16 July 19854 September 1992Labor John Bannon
6 Frank Blevins 4 September 199214 December 1993Labor Lynn Arnold
7 Stephen Baker 14 December 199328 November 1996Liberal Dean Brown
8 Graham Ingerson 28 November 19967 July 1998Liberal John Olsen
9 Rob Kerin 7 July 199822 October 2001Liberal John Olsen
10 Dean Brown 22 October 20015 March 2002Liberal Rob Kerin
11 Kevin Foley 5 March 20026 February 2011Labor Mike Rann
12 John Rau 7 February 201119 March 2018Labor Mike Rann
Jay Weatherill
13 Vickie Chapman 19 March 2018PresentLiberal Steven Marshall

Living former deputy premiers

NameTerm of officeDate of birth
Don Hopgood 198519925 September 1938
Stephen Baker 1993199630 May 1946
Graham Ingerson 1996199827 August 1941
Rob Kerin 199820014 January 1954
Dean Brown 200120025 April 1943
Kevin Foley 2002201125 September 1960
John Rau 2011201820 March 1959

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