President of the South Australian Legislative Council

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{{Infobox Political post |post = President |body = the Legislative Council |nativename = |insignia = |insigniasize = |insigniacaption = |department = |image = |alt = |incumbent = [[John Dawkins (South Australian politician)|John Dawkins] (Independent)) |incumbentsince = 8 September 2020 |style = The Honourable |residence = |nominator = |nominatorpost = |appointer = Elected by the South Australian Legislative Council |appointerpost = |termlength = |inaugural = James Hurtle Fisher |formation = 22 April 1857 |last = |abolished = |succession = |deputy = |salary = |website = }} The president of the South Australian Legislative Council is the presiding officer of the South Australian Legislative Council, the upper house of the Parliament of South Australia. The other presiding officer is the speaker of the South Australian House of Assembly.

The current president is Liberal MLC John Dawkins.

List of presidents of the Legislative Council

PresidentParty (if applicable)Term in office
James Hurtle Fisher 1857–1865
John Morphett 1865–1873
William Milne 1873–1881
Henry Ayers 1881–1893
Richard Baker 1893–1901
Lancelot Stirling 1901–1932
David Gordon Liberal and Country League 1932–1944
Walter Gordon Duncan Liberal and Country League1944–1962
Les Densley Liberal and Country League1962–1967
Lyell McEwin Liberal and Country League/Liberal Party of Australia (SA) 1967–1975
Frank Potter Liberal Party of Australia1975–1978
Arthur Whyte Liberal Party of Australia1978–1985
Anne Levy Australian Labor Party (SA) 1986–1989
Gordon Bruce Australian Labor Party1989–1993
Peter Dunn Liberal Party of Australia1994–1997
Jamie Irwin Liberal Party of Australia1997–2002
Ron Roberts Australian Labor Party2002–2006
Bob Sneath Australian Labor Party2006–2012
John Gazzola Australian Labor Party2012–2014
Russell Wortley Australian Labor Party2014–2018
Andrew McLachlan Liberal Party of Australia2018–2020
Terry Stephens Liberal Party of Australia2020
John Dawkins Liberal Party of Australia2020present

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The following is the Australian Table of Precedence.

  1. The Queen of Australia: Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II
  2. The Governor-General of Australia: His Excellency General The Honourable David Hurley AC, DSC, FTSE
  3. Governors of states in order of appointment:
    1. Governor of Queensland His Excellency The Honourable Paul de Jersey AC, QC
    2. Governor of South Australia His Excellency The Honourable Hieu Van Le AC
    3. Governor of Tasmania Her Excellency Professor The Honourable Kate Warner AC
    4. Governor of Victoria Her Excellency The Honourable Linda Dessau AC
    5. Governor of Western Australia His Excellency The Honourable Kim Beazley AC
    6. Governor of New South Wales Her Excellency The Honourable Margaret Beazley AC, QC
  4. The Prime Minister The Honourable Scott Morrison MP
  5. The President of the Senate and the Speaker of the House of Representatives in order of election:
    1. Speaker of the House of Representatives The Honourable Tony Smith MP
    2. President of the Senate Senator The Honourable Scott Ryan
  6. The Chief Justice of Australia The Honourable Susan Kiefel AC
  7. Senior diplomatic posts:
    1. Ambassadors and High Commissioners in order of date of presentation of the Letters of Credence or Commission
    2. Chargés d'affaires en pied or en titre in order of date of presentation of the Letters of Credence or Commission
    3. Chargés d'affaires and Acting High Commissioners in order of date of assumption of duties
  8. Members of the Federal Executive Council:
    1. Ministry List
  9. Administrators of Territories in order of appointment:
    1. Administrator of Norfolk Island
    2. Administrator of the Australian Indian Ocean Territories
    3. Administrator of the Northern Territory
  10. The Leader of the Opposition The Honourable Anthony Albanese MP
  11. Former holders of high offices:
    1. Former Governors-General in order of leaving office:
      1. The Hon. Bill Hayden AC (1989–1996)
      2. The Hon. Sir William Deane AC KBE QC (1996–2001)
      3. Dr Peter Hollingworth (2001–2003)
      4. The Hon. Dame Quentin Bryce AD, CVO (2008–2014)
      5. General The Hon. Sir Peter Cosgrove AK, CVO, MC (2014–2019)
    2. Former Prime Ministers in order of leaving office:
      1. The Hon. Paul Keating (1991–1996)
      2. The Hon. John Howard OM AC SSI (1996–2007)
      3. The Hon. Kevin Rudd AC
      4. The Hon. Julia Gillard AC (2010–2013)
      5. The Hon. Tony Abbott AC (2013–2015)
      6. The Hon. Malcolm Turnbull AC (2015–2018)
    3. Former Chief Justices in order of leaving office:
      1. The Hon. Sir Anthony Mason AC KBE GBM QC (1987–1995)
      2. The Hon. Sir Gerard Brennan AC KBE GBS QC (1995–1998)
      3. The Hon. Murray Gleeson AC GBS QC (1998–2008)
      4. The Hon. Robert French AC (2008–2017)
  12. Premiers of states in order of state populations, then the Chief Minister of the Northern Territory:
    1. Premier of New South Wales
    2. Premier of Victoria
    3. Premier of Queensland
    4. Premier of Western Australia
    5. Premier of South Australia
    6. Premier of Tasmania
    7. Chief Minister of the Northern Territory
  13. Justices of the High Court in order of appointment:
    1. The Hon. Virginia Bell AC
    2. The Hon. Stephen Gageler AC
    3. The Hon. Patrick Keane AC
    4. The Hon. Michelle Gordon AC
    5. The Hon. James Edelman
    6. The Hon. Simon Steward QC
    7. The Hon. Jacqueline Sarah Gleeson SC
  14. Senior judges:
    1. Chief Justice of the Federal Court of Australia
    2. President of the Fair Work Commission
  15. Chief Justices of States in order of appointment:
    1. Chief Justice of New South Wales
    2. Chief Justice of South Australia
    3. Chief Justice of Tasmania
    4. Chief Justice of Queensland
    5. Chief Justice of Victoria
    6. Chief Justice of Western Australia
  16. Australian members of the Privy Council of the United Kingdom in order of appointment:
    1. Ian Sinclair
    2. Sir William Heseltine
  17. The Chief of the Defence Force
  18. Chief Judges of Federal and Territory Courts in order of appointment
    1. Chief Justice of the Australian Capital Territory
    2. Chief Justice of the Northern Territory
    3. Chief Justice of the Family Court of Australia
  19. Members of Parliament
  20. Judges of the Federal Court of Australia and Family Court of Australia, and Deputy presidents of the Fair Work Commission in order of appointment
  21. Lord Mayors of capital cities in order of city populations:
    1. Lord Mayor of Sydney
    2. Lord Mayor of Melbourne
    3. Lord Mayor of Brisbane
    4. Lord Mayor of Perth
    5. Lord Mayor of Adelaide
    6. Lord Mayor of Hobart
    7. Lord Mayor of Darwin
  22. Heads of religious communities according to the date of assuming office in Australia
  23. Presiding officers of State Legislatures in order of appointment, then Presiding Officer of the Northern Territory legislature:
    1. President of the New South Wales Legislative Council
    2. Speaker of the Victorian Legislative Assembly
    3. Speaker of the Western Australian Legislative Assembly
    4. President of the Western Australian Legislative Council
    5. Speaker of the Legislative Assembly of Queensland
    6. Speaker of the Tasmanian House of Assembly
    7. Speaker of the South Australian House of Assembly
    8. President of the Victorian Legislative Council
    9. Speaker of the New South Wales Legislative Assembly
    10. President of the Tasmanian Legislative Council
    11. President of the South Australian Legislative Council
    12. Speaker of the Northern Territory Legislative Assembly
  24. Members of State Executive Councils in order of state populations, and then members of the Northern Territory Executive Council:
    1. Executive Council of New South Wales
    2. Executive Council of Victoria
    3. Executive Council of Queensland
    4. Executive Council of Western Australia
    5. Executive Council of South Australia
    6. Executive Council of Tasmania
    7. Executive Council of the Northern Territory
  25. Leaders of the Opposition of State Legislatures in order of state populations, then in the Northern Territory:
    1. Leader of the Opposition of New South Wales
    2. Leader of the Opposition of Victoria
    3. Leader of the Opposition of Queensland
    4. Leader of the Opposition of Western Australia
    5. Leader of the Opposition of South Australia
    6. Leader of the Opposition of Tasmania
    7. Leader of the Opposition of the Northern Territory
  26. Judges of State and Territory Supreme Courts in order of appointment:
    1. Supreme Court of New South Wales
    2. Supreme Court of Victoria
    3. Supreme Court of Queensland
    4. Supreme Court of Western Australia
    5. Supreme Court of South Australia
    6. Supreme Court of Tasmania
    7. Supreme Court of the Northern Territory
  27. Members of State Legislatures in order of state populations:
    1. New South Wales Legislative Assembly and Legislative Council
    2. Victorian Legislative Assembly and Legislative Council
    3. Queensland Legislative Assembly
    4. Western Australian Legislative Assembly and Legislative Council
    5. South Australian House of Assembly and Legislative Council
    6. Tasmanian House of Assembly and Legislative Council
    7. Northern Territory Legislative Assembly
  28. The Secretaries of Departments of the Australian Public Service and their peers and the Chiefs of the Air Force, Army, and Navy and Vice Chief of the Defence Force in order of first appointment to this group:
    1. Vice Chief of the Defence Force
    2. Chief of Navy
    3. Chief of Army
    4. Chief of Air Force
  29. Consuls-General, Consuls and Vice-Consuls according to the date on which recognition was granted
  30. Members of the Australian Capital Territory Legislative Assembly
  31. Recipients of Decorations or Honours from the Sovereign
  32. Citizens of the Commonwealth of Australia
John Dawkins (South Australian politician)

John Samuel Letts Dawkins is a South Australian Politician. Born on 3 July 1954, he is best known for his work in the South Australian Legislative Council, where he has been a part of the South Australian Division of the Liberal Party of Australia since 1997. His most prominent position in South Australian politics was as the Premiers Advocate for Suicide Prevention in the Marshall government (2018-2020) and the Legislative Council President in 2020.

The Speaker of the New South Wales Legislative Assembly is the presiding officer of the Legislative Assembly, New South Wales's lower chamber of Parliament. The current Speaker is Jonathan O'Dea, who was elected on 7 May 2019. Traditionally a partisan office, filled by the governing party of the time, O'Dea replaced the previous Liberal Speaker Shelley Hancock, following the 2019 state election.

The Speaker of the Western Australian Legislative Assembly is the presiding officer in the Legislative Assembly. The office has existed since the creation of the Legislative Assembly in 1890 under the Constitution Act 1889. The 31st and current Speaker is Labor MLA Michelle Roberts, who has held the role since the 2021 state election.

The President of the Western Australian Legislative Council, also known as the Presiding Officer of the Council, is the presiding officer of the Western Australian Legislative Council, the upper house of the Parliament of Western Australia. The position is analogous to that of the President of the Australian Senate.

The Speaker of the South Australian House of Assembly is the presiding officer of the South Australian House of Assembly, the lower house of the Parliament of South Australia. The other presiding officer is the President of the South Australian Legislative Council.

Jing Lee Malaysian-Australian politician

Jing Shyuan Lee is a Malaysian-Australian politician elected to the South Australian Legislative Council for the South Australian Division of the Liberal Party of Australia since the 2010 state election. She was formerly the president of the Asia Pacific Business Council for Women.

The President of the New South Wales Legislative Council is the presiding officer of the upper house of the Parliament of New South Wales, the Legislative Council. The presiding officer of the lower house is the speaker of the Legislative Assembly. The role of President has generally been a partisan office, filled by the governing party of the time. As of May 2021, the president is Matthew Mason-Cox.

Maynard Boyd Dawkins generally known as "M. B. Dawkins" or "Boyd Dawkins", was a sheep breeder, choirmaster and politician in the State of South Australia.

The prefix The Honourable, abbreviated to The Hon., Hon., or The Hon'ble, is an honorific style that is used before the names of certain classes of people.

This is a list of members of the South Australian Legislative Council between 2018 and 2022. As half of the Legislative Council's terms expired at each state election, half of these members were elected at the 2014 state election with terms expiring in 2022, while the other half were elected at the 2018 state election with terms expiring in 2026.

References