Don Lawrence (American football)

Last updated
Don Lawrence
Biographical details
Born (1937-06-04) June 4, 1937 (age 82)
Cleveland, Ohio
Alma mater Notre Dame
Playing career
1959–1961 Washington Redskins
Position(s) Tackle
Coaching career (HC unless noted)
1964–1965 Kansas State (assistant)
1966 Cincinnati (assistant)
1967–1970 Virginia (DC)
1971–1973Virginia
1974–1975 TCU (DC)
1976–1977 Missouri (assistant)
1978–1979 BC Lions (OL)
1980 Kansas City Chiefs (ST)
1981–1982Kansas City Chiefs (DL)
1983–1984 Buffalo Bills (DC/DL)
1985–1986 Tampa Bay Buccaneers (DL)
1987–1988Kansas City Chiefs (DL)
1989 Winnipeg Blue Bombers (OL)
1990–1997 Buffalo Bills (TE)
2000 Arizona Cardinals (TE)
2002–2003 Frankfurt Galaxy (OL)
2005 Amsterdam Admirals (OL)
2006 Cologne Centurions (assistant)
2007 Berlin Thunder (OC/OL)
2011–2012 Omaha Nighthawks (assistant)
Head coaching record
Overall11–22

Donald Jerome Lawrence (born June 4, 1937) is the former American football offensive coordinator for the Berlin Thunder in NFL Europa. He won two World Bowl rings with the Amsterdam Admirals and Frankfurt Galaxy. As the tight ends coach from 1990 to 1993, he took the Buffalo Bills to four consecutive Super Bowls. He coached at Notre Dame, Kansas State, Cincinnati, Texas Christian, and Missouri.

Lawrence served as the head football coach at the University of Virginia. He played college football at Notre Dame. He played three seasons in the National Football League for the Washington Redskins.

During his 45-year coaching career Coach Lawrence is unique in having coached in four straight Super Bowls (NFL) and four straight World Bowls (NFLE).

Head coaching record

YearTeamOverallConferenceStandingBowl/playoffs
Virginia Cavaliers (Atlantic Coast Conference)(1971–1973)
1971 Virginia 3–82–3T–3rd
1972 Virginia 4–71–5T–6th
1973 Virginia 4–73–34th
Virginia:11–226–11
Total:11–22

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