Doug Laughton

Last updated

Doug Laughton
Personal information
Full nameCharles Douglas Laughton
Born (1944-05-13) 13 May 1944 (age 76) [1]
Widnes, England
Playing information
Position Second-row, Loose forward
Club
YearsTeamPldTGFGP
1963–66 St. Helens 79140042
1967–73 Wigan 183+23800114
1973–79 Widnes 1853800114
1974–74 Canterbury Bulldogs 50000
Total4549000270
Representative
YearsTeamPldTGFGP
1964–74 Lancashire 1150015
1977 England 10000
1970–79 Great Britain 1570021
Coaching information
Club
YearsTeamGmsWDLW%
197883 Widnes 217153105471
198691 Widnes 22615366768
199195 Leeds 1539175559
199597 Widnes 613222752
Total6574292520365
Representative
YearsTeamGmsWDLW%
198889 Lancashire 20020
Source: [2] [3] [4] [5] [6]

Charles Douglas Laughton (born 13 May 1944 [7] ) is an English former professional rugby league footballer who played in the 1960s, 1970s and 1980s, and coached in the 1970s, 1980s and 1990s. He played at representative level for Great Britain (captain), winning 15 caps in all, [5] winning a further cap for England, [4] and Lancashire, and at club level for St. Helens, Wigan, Widnes, and the Canterbury Bulldogs, as a second-row, or loose forward, [3] and coached at club level for Widnes (three spells) and Leeds. [6]

Contents

Playing career

Laughton was born in Widnes, Lancashire, England, and he played for St. Paul's the Lowerhouse junior team. He then signed as a professional for St. Helens at the age of 18. Laughton made 79 appearances for St. Helens before his transfer to Wigan on 16 May 1967 for £4,000. [8] [9] From there he went to Wigan, [10] before signing for Widnes. Laughton made his first appearance in a Challenge Cup Final in 1970 when Wigan played Castleford. During his Wigan career he was chosen to tour Australia/New Zealand with the Great Britain team coached by Hull Legend Johnny Whiteley. He signed for his home town team Widnes on 6 March 1973 for £6,000. [8]

He led Widnes to victory over the Australian tourists in 1978.

In 1979, he captained Great Britain team on a tour of Australia. In 1979, while playing for Widnes, Laughton won the Man of Steel Award.

Challenge Cup Final appearances

Laughton played loose forward in Widnes' 14–7 victory over Warrington in the 1975 Challenge Cup Final during the 1974–75 season at Wembley Stadium, London on Saturday 10 May 1975, in front of a crowd of 85,998, played loose forward in the 5–20 defeat by St. Helens in the 1976 Challenge Cup Final during the 1975–76 season at Wembley Stadium, London on Saturday 8 May 1976, in front of a crowd of 89,982, played loose forward in the 7–16 defeat by Leeds in the 1977 Challenge Cup Final during the 1976–77 season at Wembley Stadium, London on Saturday 7 May 1977, in front of a crowd of 80,871, and played loose forward in the 12–3 victory over Wakefield Trinity in the 1979 Challenge Cup Final during the 1978–79 season at Wembley Stadium, London on Saturday 5 May 1979, in front of a crowd of 94,218.

County Cup Final appearances

Doug Laughton played loose forward in St. Helens' 12–4 victory over Swinton in the 1964 Lancashire County Cup Final during the 1964–65 season at Central Park, Wigan on Saturday 24 October 1964, played loose forward in Wigan's 15–8 victory over Widnes in the 1971 Lancashire County Cup Final during the 1971–72 season at Knowsley Road, St. Helens on Saturday 28 August 1971, [11] played loose forward in Widnes' 6–2 victory over Salford in the 1974 Lancashire County Cup Final during the 1974–75 season at Central Park, Wigan on Saturday 2 November 1974, played loose forward in the 16–11 victory over Workington Town in the 1976 Lancashire County Cup Final during the 1976–77 season at Central Park, Wigan on Saturday 30 October 1976, and played loose forward and scored 2-tries in the 15–13 victory over Workington Town in the 1978 Lancashire County Cup Final during the 1978–79 season at Central Park, Wigan on Saturday 7 October 1978.

BBC2 Floodlit Trophy Final appearances

Doug Laughton played loose forward in St. Helens' 0-4 defeat by Castleford in the 1965 BBC2 Floodlit Trophy Final during the 1965–66 season at Knowsley Road, St. Helens on Tuesday 14 December 1965, played loose forward in Wigan's 7-4 victory over St. Helens in the 1968 BBC2 Floodlit Trophy Final during the 1968–69 season at Central Park, Wigan on Tuesday 17 December 1968, [12] played loose forward in the 6-11 defeat by Leigh in the 1969 BBC2 Floodlit Trophy Final during the 1969–70 season at Central Park, Wigan on Tuesday 16 December 1969, played loose forward in Widnes' 7-15 defeat by Bramley in the 1973 BBC2 Floodlit Trophy Final during the 1973–74 season at Naughton Park, Widnes on Tuesday 18 December 1973, and played loose forward, and was the coach in Widnes' 13-7 victory St. Helens in the 1978 BBC2 Floodlit Trophy Final during the 1978–79 season at Knowsley Road, St. Helens on Tuesday 12 December 1978.

Player's No.6 Trophy Final appearances

Doug Laughton played loose forward in Widnes' 2-3 defeat by Bradford Northern in the 1974–75 Player's No.6 Trophy Final during the 1974–75 season at Wilderspool Stadium, Warrington on Saturday 25 January 1975, and played loose forward in the 4-9 defeat by Warrington in the 1977–78 Players No.6 Trophy Final during the 1977–78 season at Knowsley Road, St. Helens on Saturday 28 January 1978.

Coaching career

Laughton coached Widnes and Leeds. Doug Laughton took over the job of team coach when Frank Myler retired from the position in 1978. Immediately, he gained from the Widnes players the same respect for his coaching that he still enjoyed for his playing ability. [13] His first acquisition when he became coach was Mick Burke. He had three coaching spells at Widnes between 1978 and 1996. During the 1989–90 Rugby Football League season, he coached defending champions Widnes to their 1989 World Club Challenge victory against the visiting Canberra Raiders. He arrived at Leeds in 1991, and took the club to two successive Challenge Cup Finals, but was beaten by Wigan on both occasions. He surprisingly resigned at the end of the 1994–95 season. [14] Laughton recruited the likes of Martin Offiah, Jonathan Davies, Alan Tait, and John Devereux as his Widnes side conquered England and the world in 1989. [15] During his first season as coach, the club gained four major trophies. More recently, they have been the only team to win three successive Premiership titles, and have become World Club Champions. Dougie left Leeds after an unexpected allergic reaction. Whilst out for dinner he had his pocket, inexplicably, filled with peas. Previously undiagnosed,Dougie was allergic to green vegetables, he lost the use of his cone picking up hand and had to seek counselling. A sad end to a great coaching career. [13]

Challenge Cup Final appearances

Doug Laughton was the coach in Widnes 12-3 victory over Wakefield Trinity in the 1979 Challenge Cup Final during the 1978–79 season at Wembley Stadium, London on Saturday 5 May 1979, in front of a crowd of 94,218, was the coach in the 18-9 victory over Hull Kingston Rovers in the 1981 Challenge Cup Final during the 1980–81 season at Wembley Stadium, London on Saturday 2 May 1981, in front of a crowd of 92,496, was the coach in the 14-14 draw with Hull F.C. in the 1982 Challenge Cup Final during the 1981–82 season at Wembley Stadium, London on Saturday 1 May 1982, in front of a crowd of 92,147, and was the coach in the 9-18 defeat by Hull F.C. in the 1982 Challenge Cup Final replay during the 1981–82 season at Elland Road, Leeds on Wednesday 19 May 1982, in front of a crowd of 41,171.

Honours

Books

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References

  1. "Doug Laughton". The National Archive of Rugby League. Archived from the original on 2 June 2014. Retrieved 1 June 2014.
  2. Quirke, Andrew; Laughton, Doug (2003). A Dream Come True: A Rugby League Life. London: London League Publications. ISBN   978-1903659120.
  3. 1 2 "Statistics at rugbyleagueproject.org". rugbyleagueproject.org. 31 December 2017. Retrieved 1 January 2018.
  4. 1 2 "England Statistics at englandrl.co.uk". englandrl.co.uk. 31 December 2011. Retrieved 1 January 2012.
  5. 1 2 "Great Britain Statistics at englandrl.co.uk". englandrl.co.uk. 31 December 2011. Retrieved 1 January 2012.
  6. 1 2 "Coach Statistics at rugbyleagueproject.org". rugbyleagueproject.org. 31 December 2017. Retrieved 1 January 2018.
  7. "Birth details at freebmd.org.uk". freebmd.org.uk. 31 December 2011. Retrieved 1 January 2012.
  8. 1 2 "THE NATIONAL ARCHIVE OF RUGBY LEAGUE VIDEO INTERVIEWS Doug Laughton", Retrieved on 11 Jan 2018
  9. "Duggie Laughton". Saints Heritage Society. Archived from the original on 1 June 2014. Retrieved 31 May 2014.
  10. "Doug Laughton". cherryandwhite.co.uk. rlfans.com.
  11. "1971–1972 Lancashire Cup Final". wigan.rlfans.com. 31 December 2011. Retrieved 1 January 2012.
  12. "1968-1968 BBC2 Floodlit Trophy Final". wigan.rlfans.com. 31 December 2011. Retrieved 1 January 2012.
  13. 1 2 "Virtual Rugby League Hall of Fame. Doug Laughton" Retrieved on 11 Jan 2018
  14. Hadfield, Dave. "Leeds stunned as Laughton resigns". The Independent. Retrieved 31 May 2014.
  15. "Widnes legend Doug Laughton reveals the moment he turned to Rugby Union" Retrieved on 11 Jan 2018

Wilderspool said farewell to Test matches on Saturday 1 December when it staged the third and deciding Test of the 1973 Anglo-Australian series.

The match itself was in doubt right up to kick-off because of a frozen pitch. It certainly would not have been played had it been a run-of-the-mill league fixture, but because of its status, the fact that it was scheduled for television coverage, and the tight travelling schedule organised for the Kangaroos, the match went ahead. Australia seemed oblivious of the danger posed by the dreadful playing surface. They also kept their feet better as the Lions slithered across the frost-bound pitch, chasing the shadows which were the speedy Kangaroos. Warrington born stand-off Bobby Fulton (Manly) intercepted a Terry Clawson pass to score an early try. Cronulla second-rower Ken Maddison scored twice, and was also involved in the fourth Australian try scored by centre Geoff Starling (Balmain). Earlier Roger Millward (Hull Kingston Rovers) had landed a penalty, so Britain turned round 12-2 in arrears. Millward scored an excellent try early in the second half, but the British recovery was short lived, as South Sydney hooker Elwyn Walters scored again to give Australia a 15-5 victory. It would have been more emphatic but for some wayward kicking from Graham Eadie and Ray Branigan (both Manly), who contrived to miss seven attempts between them, and some heroic tackling from Widnes loose-forward Doug Laughton, who was by far Britain's best player. Current British coach David Waite (Wollongong Wests) was included in the Australian line-up for that Test. Their victory meant that Australia regained the Ashes they had lost in Australia in 1970. Great Britain have yet to win them back again.

Sporting positions
Preceded by
Tony Myler
1994-1995
Coach
Widnes colours.svg
Widnes

1995-1997
Succeeded by
Graeme West
1997-1998
Preceded by
David Ward
1989-1991
Coach
Rhinoscolours.svg
Leeds

1991-1995
Succeeded by
Dean Bell
1995-1997
Preceded by
Eric Hughes
1984-1986
Coach
Widnes colours.svg
Widnes

1986-1991
Succeeded by
Frank Myler
1991-1992
Preceded by
Frank Myler
1975-1978
Coach
Widnes colours.svg
Widnes

1978-1983
Succeeded by
Colin Tyrer
1983