Steve Nash (rugby league)

Last updated

Steve Nash
Personal information
Born (1949-04-07) 7 April 1949 (age 72)
Featherstone, England
Playing information
Position Scrum-half
Club
YearsTeamPldTGFGP
1967–75 Featherstone Rovers 193+852702298
1975–84 Salford 27531917129
Total476837919427
Representative
YearsTeamPldTGFGP
1971–81 Yorkshire 1031011
1975–81 England 71003
1971–82 Great Britain 252017
Coaching information
Club
YearsTeamGmsWDLW%
198889 Mansfield
Source: [1] [2] [3] [4] [5] [6]

Steve Nash (born 7 April 1949) is an English former professional rugby league footballer who played in the 1960s, 1970s and 1980s, and coached in the 1980s. A Great Britain and England national representative and scrum-half, [2] he played his club rugby for Featherstone Rovers (Heritage № 474), winning a Challenge Cup title with them and being one of the inaugural inductees into the club's hall of fame. He also played for the Salford club and at representative level for Yorkshire. Nash later coached the Mansfield Marksman club for a season in 1989. [6]

Contents

Background

Steve Nash was born in Featherstone, West Riding of Yorkshire, England.

Playing career

Featherstone Rovers

Nash made his début for Featherstone Rovers on Sunday 11 March 1967. [7] During the 1969–70 Northern Rugby Football League season He played scrum-half and scored a try in Featherstone Rovers' 9–12 loss against Hull F.C. in the 1969–70 Yorkshire Cup Final at Headingley Rugby Stadium, Leeds on Saturday 20 September 1969.

In 1971, while playing for Featherstone, Nash played his first matches for the Great Britain Lions against France, and New Zealand, and in 1972 against France (2 matches). He played in the 1972 World Cup Final against Australia which was drawn 10-all, enabling Great Britain to claim the Cup. During the 1972–73 Northern Rugby Football League season Steve Nash played scrum-half and was voted man of the match, winning the Lance Todd Trophy in the 33–14 victory over Bradford Bulls in the 1972–73 Challenge Cup Final at Wembley Stadium, London on Saturday 12 May 1973, in front of a crowd of 72,395. During the 1973 Kangaroo tour of Great Britain and France, Nash was selected to play for Great Britain at scrum half back in the first two Ashes Test matches against Australia. During the 1973–74 Northern Rugby Football League season he played scrum-half in the 9–24 defeat by Warrington in the 1973–74 Challenge Cup Final at Wembley Stadium, London on Saturday 11 May 1974, in front of a crowd of 77,400. Nash continued to play for Great Britain in 1974 against Australia (3 matches), and New Zealand (3 matches). Nash won caps for England while at Featherstone Rovers in the 1975 Rugby League World Cup against Wales, New Zealand, and Australia, and in 1975 against Papua New Guinea. Steve Nash won caps for Yorkshire while at Featherstone Rovers; during the 1971–72 season against Lancashire, during the 1972–73 season against Cumberland, and Lancashire, during the 1973–74 season against Cumbria, and Lancashire, and during the 1974–75 season against Cumbria.

Salford

In 1975 Nash moved to Salford, for a cash world-record £15,000 (based on increases in average earnings, this would be approximately £161,900 in 2013). [8] During the 1975–76 Northern Rugby Football League season Nash played at Scrum-half in the Premiership Final loss against St Helens. He played scrum-half in Salford's 7–16 loss to Widnes in the 1975–76 Lancashire Cup Final at Central Park, Wigan on Saturday 4 October 1975. He continued to represent Great Britain and narrowly missed out on a second World Cup victory in the 1977 Final which was lost to Australia 12–13.

In the first Test against Bob Fulton's Australia at Central Park, Wigan, in October 1978 Britain lost 15–9 and Nash and his opposite number, Tommy Raudonikis, were sent off for fighting early in the second half. The Open Rugby inaugural World XIII was revealed in June 1978, it was; Graham Eadie, John Atkinson, Steve Rogers, Jean-Marc Bourret , Green Vigo, Roger Millward, Steve Nash, Jim Mills, Keith Elwell, Steve Pitchford, Terry Randall, George Nicholls and Greg Pierce. During the 1978 Kangaroo tour of Great Britain and France Nash continued to play at half back in all three Ashes Test matches. Nash continued to represent England in 1978 against France, and Wales, and in 1981 against Wales (2 matches), [4] For the 1982 Kangaroo tour of Great Britain and France Nash was recalled to the Great Britain team as captain for the first Test against Australia at Hull in 1982. Australia won 40–4. Steve Nash also played scrum-half in Great Britain's 7–8 defeat by France in the friendly at Stadio Pier Luigi Penzo, Venice on Saturday 31 July 1982. [5] Nash finished his playing career with Rochdale Hornets. [9] His Testimonial match at Salford took place in 1984.

Post-playing

In 1989 Nash coached the Mansfield Marksman. In 2016 he became one of the ten founding inductees into the Featherstone Rovers Hall of Fame. [10]

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References

  1. RL Record Keepers' Club
  2. 1 2 "Statistics at rugbyleagueproject.org". rugbyleagueproject.org. 31 December 2017. Retrieved 1 January 2018.
  3. Platt, Darrell (1991). A History of Salford Rugby League Club. Salford Rugby League Club.
  4. 1 2 "England Statistics at englandrl.co.uk". englandrl.co.uk. 31 December 2012. Archived from the original on 13 December 2013. Retrieved 1 January 2013.CS1 maint: bot: original URL status unknown (link)
  5. 1 2 "Great Britain Statistics at englandrl.co.uk". englandrl.co.uk. 31 December 2012. Archived from the original on 13 December 2013. Retrieved 1 January 2013.CS1 maint: bot: original URL status unknown (link)
  6. 1 2 "Coach Statistics at rugbyleagueproject.org". rugbyleagueproject.org. 31 December 2017. Retrieved 1 January 2018.
  7. Bailey, Ron (20 September 2001). Images of Sport – Featherstone Rovers Rugby League Football Club. The History Press. ISBN   0752422952
  8. "Measuring Worth – Relative Value of UK Pounds". Measuring Worth. 31 December 2014. Retrieved 1 January 2015.
  9. Hughes, Ed (31 October 2004). "Caught in Time: Great Britain prepare for 1972 rugby league World Cup final". The Sunday Times . UK: Times Newspapers Ltd. Retrieved 18 October 2010.
  10. "Featherstone Rovers legends added to Hall of Fame". pontefractandcastlefordexpress.co.uk. 5 November 2016. Retrieved 1 January 2017.
Sporting positions
Preceded by

Coach
Widnes colours.svg
Mansfield Marksman

1988–1989
Succeeded by
David Sampson
1989-1993