Paul Charlton (rugby league)

Last updated

Paul Charlton
Personal information
Full nameHarold Paul Charlton
Born (1941-12-06) 6 December 1941 (age 79) [1]
Whitehaven, England
Playing information
Position Fullback
Club
YearsTeamPldTGFGP
1961–69 Workington Town 241+379770391
1969–75 Salford 233+19920301
1975–80 Workington Town 174+1320096
1981 Blackpool Borough 10+12006
Total664212790794
Representative
YearsTeamPldTGFGP
1965–79 Cumberland/Cumbria 31+1410032
1975 England 10000
1965–74 Great Britain 18+140012
1974 GB tour games 10+140012
Coaching information
Club
YearsTeamGmsWDLW%
197576 Workington Town 34234768
1982 Workington Town 14311021
199497 Carlisle
Total482651754
Source: [2] [3] [4] [5]

[6]

Harold Paul Charlton (born 6 December 1941 [7] ) is an English former professional rugby league footballer who played in the 1960s, 1970s and 1980s, and coached in the 1970s, 1980s and 1990s. He played at representative level for Great Britain, England, Cumberland and Cumbria, and at club level for Kells ARLFC (in Kells, Whitehaven), [8] Workington Town (two spells), Salford and Blackpool Borough, as a fullback, [2] and coached at club level for Workington Town. [5] He was part of the Great Britain squad which won the 1972 World Cup.

Contents

Background

Paul Charlton was born in Whitehaven, Cumberland, and as of 2017 he is living in the Gold Coast, Queensland, Australia, and now plays touch football.

Playing career

International honours

Charlton won a cap for England while at Salford in the 1975 Rugby League World Cup against France, [3] and won caps for Great Britain while at Workington in 1965 against New Zealand, while at Salford in the 1970 Rugby League World Cup against New Zealand (sub), in 1972 against France (2 matches), in the 1972 Rugby League World Cup against Australia, France, New Zealand, and Australia, in 1973 against Australia (3 matches), and in 1974 against France (2 matches), Australia (3 matches) and New Zealand (3 matches), during the 1974 Great Britain Lions tour of Australia and New Zealand he also played 11 non-Test matches scoring 8-tries and 12-goals for 48-points. [4]

County Cup Final appearances

Paul Charlton played fullback, and scored a try in Salford's 25-11 victory over Swinton in the 1972–73 Lancashire County Cup Final during the 1972–73 season at Wilderspool Stadium, Warrington on Saturday 21 October 1972, played fullback in the 9-19 defeat by Wigan in the 1973–74 Lancashire County Cup Final during the 1973–74 season at Wilderspool Stadium, Warrington on Saturday 13 October 1973, [9] played fullback in the 2-6 defeat by Widnes in the 1974–75 Lancashire County Cup Final during the 1974–75 season at Central Park, Wigan on Saturday 2 November 1974, played fullback in Workington Town's 11-16 defeat by Widnes in the 1976–77 Lancashire County Cup Final during the 1976–77 season at Central Park, Wigan on Saturday 30 October 1976, played fullback in the 16-13 victory over Wigan in the 1977–78 Lancashire County Cup Final during the 1977–78 season at Wilderspool Stadium, Warrington on Saturday 29 October 1977, played fullback in the 13-15 defeat by Widnes in the 1978–79 Lancashire County Cup Final during the 1978–79 season at Central Park, Wigan on Saturday 7 October 1978, and played fullback in the 0-11 defeat by Widnes in the 1979–80 Lancashire County Cup Final during the 1979–80 season at the Willows, Weaste, Salford, on Saturday 8 December 1979.

BBC2 Floodlit Trophy Final appearances

Paul Charlton played fullback in Salford's 0-0 draw with Warrington in the 1974 BBC2 Floodlit Trophy Final during the 1974–75 season at The Willows, Salford on Tuesday 17 December 1974, and he did not play (Stead played fullback) in the 10-5 victory over Warrington in the 1974 BBC2 Floodlit Trophy Final replay during the 1974–75 season at Wilderspool Stadium, Warrington on Tuesday 28 January 1975.

Player's No.6 Trophy Final appearances

Paul Charlton played fullback in Salford's 7-12 defeat by Leeds in the 1972–73 Player's No.6 Trophy Final during the 1972–73 season at Fartown, Huddersfield on Saturday 24 March 1973.

Career at Workington Town

In his two spells at Workington Town, Charlton made 415 appearances (Workington Town's "Appearances in a Career" record), scoring 111 tries, and kicking 77 goals, 65 of which came in two seasons, he scored 28 goals in the 1965–66 season, and 37 goals in the 1968–69 season, with Syd Lowdon and Jappie Ferreira being the primary goal-kickers in the early 1960s, followed by Ike Southward in the mid to late 1960s, during Charlton's second spell at Workington Town, the primary goal-kicker was Iain MacCorquodale (who scored 775 goals from 1972 to 1980, including over 100 goals in 4 consecutive seasons).

Personal life

Charlton married Lily (née Wilson) in 1965 in Whitehaven. They had two children: rugby league footballer who played in the 1980s, 1990s and 2000s, and coached in the 2000s and 2010s, Gary Paul Charlton (born 1967, Whitehaven), [10] [11] and Melanie Jayne Charlton (born 1971, Whitehaven).

Related Research Articles

David Watkins is a Welsh former dual-code rugby international, having played both rugby union and rugby league football for both codes' national teams between 1963 and 1974. He captained the British and Irish Lions rugby union side, and made six appearances for the Great Britain rugby league team. With the Wales national rugby league team he played in every match of the 1975 World Cup, and with English club Salford he played more than 400 games over 12 seasons

Jim Sullivan (rugby, born 1903) former GB & Wales international rugby league footballer

Jim Sullivan was a Welsh rugby league player, and coach. Sullivan joined Wigan in June 1921 after starting his career in rugby union. A a right-footed toe-end style goal-kicking fullback, he scored 4,883 points in a career that spanned 25 years with Wigan, and still holds several records with the club today.

Gus Risman Welsh RL coach and former GB, England & Wales international rugby league footballer

Augustus "Gus" John Ferdinand Risman was a Welsh professional rugby league footballer who played in the 1920s through to the 1950s, and coached in the 1940s through to the 1970s.

Michael Adams was an English professional rugby league footballer who played in the 1970s and 1980s. He played at representative level for Great Britain and England, and at club level for the Canterbury-Bankstown Bulldogs and captained Widnes. He played as a second-row or loose forward, i.e. number 11 or 12, or, 13, during the era of contested scrums.

Eric Hughes was an English rugby union and professional rugby league footballer who played in the 1960s, 1970s and 1980s, and coached rugby league in the 1980s and 1990s. He played representative level rugby union (RU) for England (Under-15s), and representative level rugby league (RL) for Great Britain and England, and at club level for Widnes, Canterbury-Bankstown Bulldogs, St Helens and the Rochdale Hornets, as a wing, centre or stand-off, i.e. number 2 or 5, or, 3 or 4, or 6, and coached at club level for Widnes, Rochdale Hornets, St Helens, Leigh and the Wigan Warriors. He unwittingly added confusion to the Canterbury-Bankstown Bulldogs team as he was unrelated but played at the same time as the three Australian brothers named Hughes; Garry, Graeme and Mark.

Maurice Charles Rees Richards is a Welsh former dual-code international rugby footballer. A wing, he was part of the 1968 British Lions tour to South Africa. His grandfather had been a professional footballer with Charlton Athletic and Bradford City in the 1920s.

Jim "Big Jim" Mills is a Welsh former rugby union, and professional rugby league footballer who played in the 1960s, 1970s and 1980s. A Wales and Great Britain international representative prop, "Big Jim" as he was known, played club rugby in England with Halifax, Salford, Bradford Northern, Widnes and Workington Town, and also in Australia for North Sydney. He is the father of former Widnes forward David Mills.

Arnold Walker, also known by the nickname of "Boxer", is an English former professional rugby league footballer who played in the 1970s and 1980s. He played at representative level for Great Britain, England and Cumbria, and at club level for Kells A.R.L.F.C., and Cumbrian rivals; Workington Town and Whitehaven, as a stand-off, or scrum-half, i.e. number 6, or 7.

Christopher Hesketh was an English World Cup winning professional rugby league footballer who played in the 1960s and 1970s. He played at representative level for Great Britain, England and Lancashire as a centre, and at club level for Wigan and Salford, as a centre, or stand-off, i.e. number 3 or 4, or 6.

Edward "Eddie" Bowman is an English former professional rugby league footballer who played in the 1960s, 1970s and 1980s. He played at representative level for Great Britain and Cumberland, and at club level for Kells ARLFC, Whitehaven, Workington Town, Leigh and Wigan, as a prop, or second-row, i.e. number 8 or 10, or, 11 or 12, during the era of contested scrums.

Raymond "Ray" F. Dutton is an English former professional rugby league footballer who played in the 1960s, 1970s and 1980s, and coached in the 1970s and 1980s. He played at representative level for Great Britain and England, and at club level for Runcorn ARLFC, Widnes Rovers ARLFC, Widnes and Whitehaven, as a right-footed toe-end style goal-kicking fullback, i.e. number 1, and coached at club level for Whitehaven and Widnes Tigers ARLFC.

David Eckersley (born 10 October 1948 is an English former professional rugby league footballer who played in the 1960s, 1970s and 1980s. He played at representative level for Great Britain and England, and at club level for Leigh, St Helens, Widnes, Cronulla-Sutherland Sharks and Fulham RLFC, as a goal-kicking fullback, centre or stand-off, i.e. number 1, 3 or 4, or, 6.

Keith Elwell, also known by the nicknames of "The Mole", "Chiefy", and "The Ubiquitous Elwell", is an English former professional rugby league footballer who played in the 1970s and 1980s. He played at representative level for Great Britain, England and Lancashire, and at club level for Widnes and on loan to Barrow, as a fullback or hooker, i.e. number 1, or 9.

Keith John Fielding born in Birmingham, is an English dual-code international rugby union, and professional rugby league footballer who played in the 1960s, 1970s and 1980s. He played representative level rugby union (RU) for England, and at club level for Moseley Rugby Football Club, as a Wing, i.e. number 11 or 14, and representative level rugby league (RL) for Great Britain and England, and at club level for Salford, as a wing, i.e. number 2 or 5.

Kenneth Gill is an English former professional rugby league footballer who played in the 1970s and 1980s. He played at representative level for Great Britain and England, and at club level for Salford, Widnes and Barrow, as a stand-off.

Derek Whitehead is an English former professional rugby league footballer who played in the 1960s and 1970s. He played at representative level for Great Britain and Lancashire, and at club level for Folly Lane ARLFC, Swinton, Oldham and Warrington, as a goal-kicking fullback, i.e. number 1.

Stuart Wright is an English former professional rugby league footballer who played in the 1960s, 1970s and 1980s. He played at representative level for Great Britain, England and Lancashire, and at club level for Wigan and Widnes, as a wing, i.e. number 2 or 5.

John V. Risman is the President of Scotland Rugby League, and a former professional rugby league footballer who played in the 1970s and 1980s. He played at representative level for Wales, and at club level for Workington Town, Fulham, Blackpool Borough and Carlisle, as a fullback, or centre, i.e. number 1, or, 3 or 4, he was coach of Scotland Students RL for the 1996 University Rugby League World Cup.

Malcolm "Mal" Aspey is an English former professional rugby league footballer who played in the 1960s, 1970s and 1980s, and coached in the 1980s. He played at club level for Widnes, Fulham RLFC, Wigan, and Salford, as a centre, i.e. number 3 or 4, and coached at club level for Salford.

William Pattinson, also known as Billy Pattinson, is an English former professional rugby league footballer who played in the 1970s and 1980s. He played at representative level for the British Amateur Rugby League Association Great Britain Lions, England and Cumbria, and at club level for Broughton Moor ARLFC, Cockermouth ARLFC, and Workington Town, as a second-row or loose forward, i.e. number 11 or 12, or 13, during the era of contested scrums.

References

  1. "Paul Charlton". The National Archive of Rugby League. Archived from the original on 2 June 2014. Retrieved 1 June 2014.
  2. 1 2 "Statistics at rugbyleagueproject.org". rugbyleagueproject.org. 31 December 2017. Retrieved 1 January 2018.
  3. 1 2 "England Statistics at englandrl.co.uk". englandrl.co.uk. 31 December 2017. Retrieved 1 January 2018.
  4. 1 2 "Great Britain Statistics at englandrl.co.uk". englandrl.co.uk. 31 December 2017. Retrieved 1 January 2018.
  5. 1 2 "Coach Statistics at rugbyleagueproject.org". rugbyleagueproject.org. 31 December 2017. Retrieved 1 January 2018.
  6. RL Record Keepers' Club
  7. "Birth details at freebmd.org.uk". freebmd.org.uk. 31 December 2011. Retrieved 1 January 2012.
  8. "Kells ARLFC". kellsarl.co.uk. 31 December 2017. Retrieved 1 January 2018.
  9. "1973-1974 Lancashire Cup Final". wigan.rlfans.com. 31 December 2011. Archived from the original on 13 July 2018. Retrieved 1 January 2012.
  10. "Gary Charlton Statistics at rugbyleagueproject.org". rugbyleagueproject.org. 31 December 2017. Retrieved 1 January 2018.
  11. "Gary Charlton Coach Statistics at rugbyleagueproject.org". rugbyleagueproject.org. 31 December 2017. Retrieved 1 January 2018.
Sporting positions
Preceded by
Hugh Waddell
1994
Coach
Great Britain colours.svg
Carlisle RLFC

1995-1997
Succeeded by
Club folded
Preceded by
Tommy Bishop
1980–1981
Coach
Workingtoncolours.svg
Workington Town

1982
Succeeded by
Harry Archer
1983-1984
Preceded by
Eppie Gibson
1971–1973
Coach
Workingtoncolours.svg
Workington Town

1975–1979
Succeeded by
Tommy Bishop
1980–1981