Rees Thomas (rugby league)

Last updated

Rees Thomas
Personal information
Born31 August 1926
Maesteg, Glamorgan, Wales
DiedMarch 1984 (aged 57)
unknown
Playing information
Rugby union
Club
YearsTeamPldTGFGP
≤1949–≤49 Maesteg RFC
≤1949–≤49 Royal Navy
≤1949–49 Devonport Services R.F.C.
Total00000
Representative
YearsTeamPldTGFGP
≤1949–≤49 Cornwall ≥1
Rugby league
Position Scrum-half
Club
YearsTeamPldTGFGP
1949–56 Swinton 218150045
1956–59 Wigan 1025117
1959–?? Swinton
Total320201062
Representative
YearsTeamPldTGFGP
1959 Wales 1
Coaching information
Club
YearsTeamGmsWDLW%
197274 Swinton
Source: [1]

Rees Thomas (31 August 1926 – March 1984) was a Welsh rugby union and professional rugby league footballer who played in the 1940s, 1950s and 1960s, and coached rugby league in the 1970s. He played representative level rugby union (RU) for Cornwall, and at club level for Maesteg RFC, Royal Navy and Devonport Services R.F.C., and representative level rugby league (RL) for Wales, and at club level for Swinton and Wigan, as a scrum-half, i.e. number 7, and coached at club level for Swinton. [2]

Contents

Background

Rees Thomas was born in Maesteg, Glamorgan, Wales, he later served in the Royal Navy during World War II, and he died aged 57.

Playing career

International honours

Rees Thomas won a cap for Wales (RL) while at Wigan in the 8-25 defeat by France at Stade des Minimes, Toulouse on Sunday 1 March 1959. [1]

Challenge Cup Final appearances

Rees Thomas played scrum-half, and was man of the match winning the Lance Todd Trophy in Wigan's 13-9 victory over Workington Town in the 1958 Challenge Cup Final during the 1957–58 season at Wembley Stadium, London on Saturday 10 May 1958, in front of a crowd of 66,109, [3] and played scrum-half in the 30-13 victory over Hull F.C. in the 1959 Challenge Cup Final during the 1958–59 season at Wembley Stadium, London on Saturday 9 May 1959, in front of a crowd of 79,811. [4]

Notable tour matches

Rees Thomas played in Swinton's defeat to Australia in the 1952–53 Kangaroo tour of Great Britain and France match during the 1952–53 season.

Club career

Rees Thomas changed rugby football codes from rugby union to rugby league when he transferred from Devonport Services R.F.C. to Swinton, he made his début for Swinton against Dewsbury on Saturday 17 September 1949, and he played his last match (in his second spell) for Swinton against Widnes on Wednesday 27 April 1960, he transferred from Swinton to Wigan at the start of the 1956–57 season.

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References

  1. 1 2 "Statistics at rugbyleagueproject.org". rugbyleagueproject.org. 31 December 2019. Retrieved 1 January 2020.
  2. Williams, Graham; Lush, Peter; Farrar, David (2009). The British Rugby League Records Book. London League. p. 108. ISBN   978-1-903659-49-6.
  3. "1957–1958 Challenge Cup Final". wigan.rlfans.com. 31 December 2011. Retrieved 1 January 2012.
  4. "1958–1959 Challenge Cup Final". wigan.rlfans.com. 31 December 2012. Retrieved 1 January 2013.
Sporting positions
Preceded by
David Mortimer
1971–1972
Coach
Swintoncolours.svg
Swinton

1972–1974
Succeeded by
Austin Rhodes
1974–1975