EuroBasket 1946

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EuroBasket 1946
Tournament details
Host country Switzerland
City Geneva
Dates 30 April – 4 May
Teams 10
Venue(s) 1 (in 1 host city)
Final positions
ChampionsFlag of the Czech Republic.svg  Czechoslovakia (1st title)
Runners-upFlag of Italy.svg  Italy
Third placeFlag of Hungary (1946-1949, 1956-1957).svg  Hungary
Fourth placeFlag of France.svg  France
Tournament statistics
MVP Flag of Hungary (1946-1949, 1956-1957).svg François Németh
Top scorer Flag of Poland.svg Pawel Stok
(12.6 points per game)
1941
1947

The 1946 FIBA European Championship, commonly called FIBA EuroBasket 1946, was the fourth FIBA EuroBasket regional basketball championship, held by FIBA Europe and the first since 1939 due to World War II. Ten national teams affiliated with the International Basketball Federation (FIBA) took part in the competition. Switzerland hosted the tournament for a second time, as the championship returned to Geneva.

Basketball team sport played on a court with baskets on either end

Basketball is a team sport in which two teams, most commonly of five players each, opposing one another on a rectangular court, compete with the primary objective of shooting a basketball through the defender's hoop while preventing the opposing team from shooting through their own hoop. A field goal is worth two points, unless made from behind the three-point line, when it is worth three. After a foul, timed play stops and the player fouled or designated to shoot a technical foul is given one or more one-point free throws. The team with the most points at the end of the game wins, but if regulation play expires with the score tied, an additional period of play (overtime) is mandated.

FIBA Europe European basketball association

FIBA Europe is a zone within the International Basketball Federation (FIBA) which includes all 50 national European basketball federations.

World War II 1939–1945 global war

World War II, also known as the Second World War, was a global war that lasted from 1939 to 1945. The vast majority of the world's countries—including all the great powers—eventually formed two opposing military alliances: the Allies and the Axis. A state of total war emerged, directly involving more than 100 million people from over 30 countries. The major participants threw their entire economic, industrial, and scientific capabilities behind the war effort, blurring the distinction between civilian and military resources. World War II was the deadliest conflict in human history, marked by 50 to 85 million fatalities, most of whom were civilians in the Soviet Union and China. It included massacres, the genocide of the Holocaust, strategic bombing, premeditated death from starvation and disease, and the only use of nuclear weapons in war.

Contents

EuroBasket 1946 saw the beginning of the use of the jump shot, pioneered by Italy's Giuseppe Stefanini.

Results

The 1946 competition consisted of a preliminary round, with one group of four teams and two groups of three teams each. Each team played the other teams in its group once. The top team in each of the groups of three and the top two teams in the group of four played in the semifinals for the top four rankings; the middle teams in the two groups of three moved directly on to the final round for a 5th/6th place playoff; the bottom team in each group of three and the two bottom teams in the group of four played in semifinals for the 7th–10th ranks.

First round

Group A

PosTeamPldWLPFPAPDPtsQualification
1Flag of Italy.svg  Italy 33015271+816Semifinal
2Flag of Hungary (1946-1949, 1956-1957).svg  Hungary 32111370+435
3Flag of Poland.svg  Poland 31291102114Classification 7–10
4Flag of Luxembourg.svg  Luxembourg 303531661133
Poland45 – 28Luxembourg
Italy39 – 31Hungary
Luxembourg10 – 48Hungary
Poland25 – 40Italy
Italy73 – 15Luxembourg
Poland21 – 34Hungary

Group B

PosTeamPldWLPFPAPDPtsQualification
1Flag of France.svg  France 22011229+834Semifinal
2Flag of the Netherlands.svg  Netherlands 211667483Classification 5–6
3Flag of England.svg  England 20238113752Classification 7–10
England27 – 48Netherlands
England11 – 65France
France47 – 18Netherlands

Group C

PosTeamPldWLPFPAPDPtsQualification
1Flag of the Czech Republic.svg  Czechoslovakia 2205850+84Semifinal
2Flag of Switzerland.svg   Switzerland 2115043+73Classification 5–6
3Flag of Belgium (civil).svg  Belgium 2025671152Classification 7–10
Czechoslovakia20 – 17Switzerland
Belgium23 – 33Switzerland
Belgium33 – 38Czechoslovakia

Final round

The middle team of each of the groups of three did not compete in the final round, as they advanced directly to the 5th/6th place playoff. The top team of each of those groups played one of the top two teams of the group of four, with rankings 1st–4th at stake. Similarly, the bottom team in each group of three played one of the two lower teams in the group of four in a semifinal for 7th–10th places.

Brackets

Classification 7–10

 
Classification semi-finalsSeventh place match
 
      
 
 
 
 
Flag of England.svg  England 27
 
 
 
Flag of Luxembourg.svg  Luxembourg 50
 
Flag of Luxembourg.svg  Luxembourg
 
 
 
Flag of Belgium (civil).svg  Belgium
 
Flag of Poland.svg  Poland 22
 
 
Flag of Belgium (civil).svg  Belgium 39
 
Ninth place match
 
 
 
 
 
Flag of England.svg  England
 
 
Flag of Poland.svg  Poland

Classification 5th–6th

 
Fifth place match
 
  
 
 
 
 
Flag of the Netherlands.svg  Netherlands
 
 
Flag of Switzerland.svg   Switzerland
 
England27 – 50Luxembourg
Poland22 – 39Belgium

Upper bracket

Czechoslovakia42 – 28Hungary
Italy37 – 25France

Final classification matches

In this stage, all teams played their penultimate games to determine the final rankings.

9th/10th place:

England22 – 50Poland

7th/8th place:

Belgium42 – 11Luxembourg

5th/6th place:

Netherlands25 – 36Switzerland

3rd/4th place:

Hungary38 – 32France

Championship:

Czechoslovakia34 – 32Italy
 1946 FIBA EuroBasket Champions 
Flag of the Czech Republic.svg
Czechoslovakia
1st title

Final rankings

  1. Flag of the Czech Republic.svg  Czechoslovakia
  2. Flag of Italy.svg  Italy
  3. Flag of Hungary (1946-1949, 1956-1957).svg  Hungary
  4. Flag of France.svg  France
  5. Flag of Switzerland.svg   Switzerland
  6. Flag of the Netherlands.svg  Netherlands
  7. Flag of Belgium (civil).svg  Belgium
  8. Flag of Luxembourg.svg  Luxembourg
  9. Flag of Poland.svg  Poland
  10. Flag of England.svg  England

Team rosters

1. Czechoslovakia: Ivan Mrázek, Miloš Bobocký, Jiří Drvota, Josef Ezr, Gustav Hermann, Jan Hluchy, Josef Křepela, Pavel Nerad, Ladislav Simácek, František Stibitz, Josef Toms, Ladislav Trpkoš, Emil Velenský, Miroslav Vondráček (Coach: Frantisek Hajek)

Ivan Mrázek is a retired Czech professional basketball player and coach. At 5'7 ​12" tall, he was a point guard. He was named one of FIBA's 50 Greatest Players, in 1991.

Jiří Drvota was a Czech basketball player. He competed in the men's tournament at the 1948 Summer Olympics.

Josef Ezr was a Czech basketball player. He competed in the men's tournament at the 1948 Summer Olympics and the 1952 Summer Olympics.

2. Italy: Cesare Rubini, Giuseppe Stefanini, Sergio Stefanini, Albino Bocciai, Mario Cattarini, Marcello de Nardus, Armando Fagarazzi, Giancarlo Marinelli, Valentino Pellarini, Tullio Pitacco, Venzo Vannini

Cesare Rubini Italian water polo and basketball player

Cesare Rubini was an Italian professional basketball player and coach, and a water polo player. He was considered to be one of the greatest European basketball coaches of all time, Rubini was inducted into the Basketball Hall of Fame in 1994, making him the first, and to this day, just one of three Italian basketball figures to receive such an honour, alongside Dino Meneghin and Sandro Gamba. He was also inducted into the International Swimming Hall of Fame in 2000.

Sergio Stefanini was an Italian basketball player. He competed in the men's tournament at the 1948 Summer Olympics and the 1952 Summer Olympics.

Giancarlo Marinelli was an Italian basketball player who competed in the 1936 Summer Olympics and the 1948 Summer Olympics.

3. Hungary: François Németh, Geza Bajari, Antal Bankuti, Geza Kardos, Laszlo Kiralyhidi, Tibor Mezőfi, György Nagy, Geza Racz, Ede Vadaszi, Ferenc Velkei (Coach: Istvan Kiraly)

Tibor Mezőfi was a Hungarian basketball player who competed in the 1948 Summer Olympics and in the 1952 Summer Olympics.

György Nagy was a Hungarian basketball player. He competed in the men's tournament at the 1948 Summer Olympics.

4. France: Robert Busnel, André Buffière, Etienne Roland, Paul Chaumont, René Chocat, Jean Duperray, Emile Frezot, Maurice Girardot, Andre Goeuriot, Henri Lesmayoux, Jacques Perrier, Lucien Rebuffic, Justy Specker, Andre Tartary (Coach: Paul Geist)

Robert Busnel was a French professional basketball player, coach, and administrator. During his playing career, the 1.92 m tall Busnel, played at the power forward position. He was made an Officer of the Legion of Honor, in 1989, and was awarded the Olympic Order, by the IOC, in 1990. He was awarded the Glory of Sport in 1994. He was inducted into the French Basketball Hall of Fame, in 2005. In 2007, he was enshrined as a contributor to the FIBA Hall of Fame.

Pierre André Buffière was a French basketball player and coach. He was born in Vion, Ardèche. He was awarded the Glory of Sport in 1995. He was inducted into the French Basketball Hall of Fame, in 2004.

René Chocat was a French basketball player. He was inducted into the French Basketball Hall of Fame, in 2012.

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