Gakko II

Last updated
Gakko II
Directed by Yoji Yamada
Written byYoji Yamada
Starring Toshiyuki Nishida
Hidetaka Yoshioka
Masatoshi Nagase
Ayumi Ishida
Hiroshi Kanbe
Music by Isao Tomita
Release date
  • 19 October 1996 (1996-10-19)
CountryJapan
LanguageJapanese

Gakko II(学校II,Gakkō II) is a 1996 Japanese film directed by Yoji Yamada. It is a sequel to Yamada's 1993 film A Class to Remember .

Yoji Yamada is a Japanese film director best known for his Otoko wa Tsurai yo series of films and his Samurai Trilogy.

<i>A Class to Remember</i> 1993 film by Yōji Yamada

A Class to Remember is a 1993 Japanese film directed by Yōji Yamada. It was chosen as Best Film at the Japan Academy Prize ceremony.

Contents

The film was Japan's submission to the 69th Academy Awards for the Academy Award for Best Foreign Language Film, but was not accepted as a nominee. [1] [2] [3]

69th Academy Awards Academy Awards ceremony

The 69th Academy Awards ceremony, organized by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences (AMPAS) took place on March 24, 1997, at the Shrine Auditorium in Los Angeles beginning at 6:00 p.m. PST / 9:00 p.m. EST. During the ceremony, AMPAS presented the Academy Awards in 24 categories honoring films released in 1996. The ceremony, televised in the United States by ABC, was produced by Gil Cates, and directed by Louis J. Horvitz. Actor Billy Crystal hosted the show for the fifth time. He first presided over the 62nd ceremony held in 1990 and had last hosted the 65th ceremony held in 1993. Three weeks earlier, in a ceremony held at the Regent Beverly Wilshire Hotel in Beverly Hills, California, on March 1, the Academy Awards for Technical Achievement were presented by host Helen Hunt. This also served as the launch event for DVD, with its U.S. launch being on the same day as the ceremony.

Cast

Toshiyuki Nishida Japanese actor

Toshiyuki Nishida is a Japanese actor.

Hidetaka Yoshioka is a Japanese actor known for his performance in several movies as a child and lately the award-winning TV drama Dr. Kotō Shinryōjo. He notably played the part of Tora-san's little nephew in the "Otoko wa Tsurai yo" film series, and he appeared in Akira Kurosawa's "Rhapsody in August" and "Madadayo". He won the Japan Academy Award Best Actor in 2006 for "Always - Sunset on Third Street".

Masatoshi Nagase Japanese actor

Masatoshi Nagase is a Japanese actor. He is best known in the West for his roles in Friðrik Þór Friðriksson's Cold Fever and Jim Jarmusch's Mystery Train.

See also

Related Research Articles

<i>Floating Life</i> 1996 film by Clara Law

Floating Life is a 1996 Australian drama film directed by Clara Law about a Hong Kong family who move to Australia. The film was selected as the Australian entry for the Best Foreign Language Film at the 69th Academy Awards, but was not accepted as a nominee.

Devil's Island is a 1996 Icelandic film directed by Friðrik Þór Friðriksson. It is a dark comedy filmed in the Grótta area of South west Iceland. The story depicts a group of otherwise homeless families living in barracks abandoned by the US Air Force after the Second World War. The film was selected as the Icelandic entry for the Best Foreign Language Film at the 69th Academy Awards, but was not accepted as a nominee.

Deathmaker is a 1995 German film directed by Romuald Karmakar and starring Götz George, Jürgen Hentsch and Pierre Franckh. The film is based on the transcripts of the interrogation of the notorious serial killer Fritz Haarmann.

<i>Long Live the Queen</i> (film) 1995 film by Esmé Lammers

Long Live the Queen is a 1995 Dutch children's film directed by Esmé Lammers. It tells the tale of a little girl who learns to play chess thanks to enchanted chess pieces. The film was selected as the Dutch entry for the Best Foreign Language Film at the 69th Academy Awards, but was not accepted as a nominee.

Nausikaya (Nausikaja) is a 1995 Croatian film directed, written and produced by Vicko Ruić. It is based on "The Spider", a horror short story by Hanns Heinz Ewers. The film was selected as the Croatian entry for the Best Foreign Language Film at the 69th Academy Awards, but was not accepted as a nominee.

Kolonel Bunker is an Albanian, French and Polish historical film. It was released in 1996. The film was selected as the Albanian entry for the Best Foreign Language Film at the 69th Academy Awards, but was not accepted as a nominee.

Hi Cousin! is a 1996 Algerian comedy film directed by Merzak Allouache. The film was selected as the Algerian entry for the Best Foreign Language Film at the 69th Academy Awards, but was not accepted as a nominee.

Tieta do Agreste is a 1996 Brazilian comedy film directed by Carlos Diegues. The film was selected as the Brazilian entry for the Best Foreign Language Film at the 69th Academy Awards, but was not accepted as a nominee.

<i>Think of Me</i> (film) 1996 film

Think of Me is a 1996 Cuban drama film directed by Arturo Sotto Díaz. The film was selected as the Cuban entry for the Best Foreign Language Film at the 69th Academy Awards, but was not accepted as a nominee.

<i>Hu-Du-Men</i> 1996 film by Shu Kei

Hu-Du-Men is a 1996 Hong Kong comedy film directed by Shu Kei. The film was selected as the Hong Kong entry for the Best Foreign Language Film at the 69th Academy Awards, but was not accepted as a nominee.

Felix is a 1996 Slovenian drama film directed by Božo Šprajc. The film was selected as the Slovenian entry for the Best Foreign Language Film at the 69th Academy Awards, but was not accepted as a nominee.

Bwana is a 1996 Spanish drama film directed by Imanol Uribe. The film was selected as the Spanish entry for the Best Foreign Language Film at the 69th Academy Awards, but was not accepted as a nominee.

Les Agneaux is a 1996 Swiss drama film directed by Marcel Schüpbach. The film was selected as the Swiss entry for the Best Foreign Language Film at the 69th Academy Awards, but was not accepted as a nominee.

References

  1. "List of Japanese films nominated for Academy Award for Best Foreign Language Film" (in Japanese). Motion Picture Producers Association of Japan. Retrieved 2008-06-22.
  2. Margaret Herrick Library, Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences
  3. "39 Countries Hoping for Oscar Nominations". Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences. 13 November 1996. Archived from the original on February 9, 1999. Retrieved 5 October 2015.